Interview

Andrea Alonge

*Foto in evidenza: Reality Is Duality-detail, 2020. 50” x 56”. Fabric, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Iridescent and multicoloured surfaces, shimmering textures and optical illusions are a few aspects of Andrea Alonge’s textile works that catch the viewer’s attention. However, beyond the threshold of this first impact, almost playful and indeed stimulating, the work shows a more spiritual content and intent. Through the use of symbols and forms, the artist explores the theme of human relationships and the connection between man, nature, society and the universe: “A thought that comforts me is the idea of our connections to everything through our chemical makeup – we are made up of the water, and the same elements as the stars and the trees, and the air that we breathe, and our universal consciousness. We are all touching. We will touch forever.”

Originally from Mesa, Arizona, Andrea Alonge received her education at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and her Master’s of Fine Arts at Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI. She currently lives and works in Portland, Oregon. 

http://www.andreaalonge.com/

Reality Is Duality, 2020. 50” x 56”. Fabric, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

How did you approach art? What was your path, how and when did you come into contact with the textile medium?

I have been making art since I was a child, always with a focus on sculpture and three-dimensional work. I started making dollhouses and dollhouse furniture at age 8. When I started high school (secondary school), I took a ceramics class and loved it. At one point, my teacher looked at my work with me and said “you might think about going to college for this”. I had never thought of that before, but the possibility was very exciting for me and I chose to pursue an art degree with a focus in ceramics. After being in school for three years, I took a break, and during that break I realized that while I loved ceramics, it was a medium that required a lot of specialized equipment and a space dedicated to clay. I had grown up with a parent who loved textiles, and I knew how to sew and it was something we had done together. I started thinking about textiles as a medium that would be more sustainable for me in the long-term, because I owned a sewing machine and I could use it in a small apartment without needing a separate studio that could get dirty. I went back to school at The School of The Art Institute of Chicago, obtaining my BFA from this institution, and while I was there, I took many classes in the fiber and material studies department, and eventually transitioned all of my work to textile work, though I did continue to make ceramics throughout graduate school. When I graduated from SAIC, I was accepted into the Fiber department at Cranbrook Academy of Art, and the majority of the work I produced there was textile work. I am very interested in the history, critical theory, and discourse around textiles and craft as a broader category, and this medium is a perfect fit for me and the stories I tell and hope to continue telling. Textiles are tactile, associated with touch and use, and they also form the structure of our days- we wear clothes, we sleep in bed linens, we surround ourselves with textiles. Textiles also contain history- grandmother’s quilt, clothes that remind us of things that happened while wearing them, vintage textiles which remind us of the eras in which they were created. I think of textiles as objects that connect us. We are connected to the people who made our clothing, who produced the cloth.

We Belong Together, 2021. View. 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Can See The Stars In All Directions, 2018. 37” x 52”. Found fabrics, chain, sequins, thread, trim, embroidery, plastic. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Can See The Stars In All Directions-detail, 2018. 37” x 52”. Found fabrics, chain, sequins, thread, trim, embroidery, plastic. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

We Belong Together. Can you tell us something about this project, how it was born and what it’s about?

This project was commissioned by Meta Open Arts, which is a program founded by Meta that brings in artists to create work for Meta employee buildings in local regions. I was contacted by Meta to create a project for an employee building in their Seattle region in 2021. I began to think about textiles as a connection, and how I could use textiles as a metaphor for internet and social media connections. How do we connect through social media? The first identifier of the internet is as the World Wide Web- how could I think about what that web might look like? What does information look like as it travels from me to you? I think of the information as water- it flows from a source, through pipes and tubes, it can be clean or polluted, it can flow far and spread widely, or it can be centered in one place. I was thinking a lot about the good and bad ways we can connect, and the physical infrastructure that makes social media connection possible. In our time where we can connect with almost anyone through the web and social media, we are all connected whether we want to be or not. In all the Meta offices, there are signs for their motto, which is “stronger together”, and I thought about that when I installed the pieces and named the work. There is a Pat Benatar song with the line “whatever we deny or embrace/ for worse or for better/ we belong/ we belong we belong together” and I think that expresses perfectly the nature of social media. We are all here together, connected in this world through different avenues, and some of the ways we connect are bad and some are good, but there is no way to disconnect. We are all together, and we belong together.

We Belong Together, 2021. View. 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Belong Together, 2021. View. 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Belong Together-detail, 2021, 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Belong Together-detail, 2021, 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge

How important is improvisation in your work? And what is your source of inspiration today?

Improvisation is an important part of my work that helps my ideas take shape. Since graduate school at Cranbrook, I have felt that fabric designs and manufactured textiles have played a major role in the forms my work takes. I will see a pattern that reminds me of a brick wall, for example, and the piece I make will spring from that idea of the wall. That’s what happened when I made the work “Sometimes When We Touch”, which is based loosely on the story of Pyramus and Thisbe, lovers and neighbors who were separated from one another by the wall between their parent’s houses. I think of fabric designs as a mark-making tool, drawing lines with stripes or mixing floral fabrics together to create a field of flowers. I also feel that it is important to alter the fabrics in some way with my marks; using surface embellishments such as quilting or embroidery or yarn-tying, I am able to blur the original design of the fabric and make the work my own. My current source of inspiration is universal symbols, circles, spirals, triangles, boxes, infinity signs. These are symbols that have been used since ancient times, and I am interested in how we read those symbols now and how I can connect them to the world in which we currently live. Those symbols connected us since prehistory, and were ways to leave messages for one another or to express our truths.

Sometimes When We Touch, 2019. 46” x 42”. Fabric, trim, embroidery, appliqué. Photo By John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Sometimes When We Touch-detail, 2019. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Is there a work or project to which you feel particularly attached or that has played a significant role in your personal and/or professional path?

I am particularly attached to a work that I made in 2020 called “The Beach Is Within Me”. During the pandemic, I, like many others, was isolated and indoors, and I wanted to make a piece that comforted me. A few years ago, I was working at a grocery store, and one of my regular customers would ask me how I was doing. I often replied “I wish I was at the beach”, which is my calming, happy place to be. She would reply “the beach is within you, Andrea”, and to me, this was a perfect reminder that the calm, still center is within me, as it is within all of us. We all have the ability to go within and find the center. When the pandemic hit, and continued to drag on and on, I began to think about this idea more and more- that we must find the place inside so we can go on and continue to live in the face of death. This piece was my response to this situation, and it is one of the most meditative works I have made, which I love.

The Beach Is Within Me, 2020. 48” diameter. Fabric, yarn, pompoms, batting. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Today, social networks provide a possibility of continuous connection with a very large audience. As an artist, how do you live your relationship with the web? 

I find the web to be vastly interesting, and since graduate school have always researched and thought about social networks and our connection through the web. While my work is tactile, I am interested in how it lives in a digital space and translates to a digital audience. My work is challenging to photograph- lots of sparkles, glitter, tiny stripes that become warped when shown on a screen. I love the possibility that my work changes in different formats- it will be one thing when viewed in person and another when viewed on the screen. This feels like an apt metaphor to me- our lives on social media or in the digital realm are one perspective, a heavily curated view, while our in-person lives are more complex and sometimes completely different. I am also interested in the macro/micro aspect of the work, and often build the pieces so that there are rewards for looking up close- a little bonus for those who can see them in person. I feel like the web has been very helpful for work; I can reach more people with my works than I would be able to if they only saw it in person. I’m speaking with you now, likely because you have seen the work online, and not because you have seen it in person. But I also really appreciate the ability to connect with people all over the world, and to see art that I wouldn’t see in a physical space. I also feel that textiles themselves are representative of global connections through manufacturing- so many of our textiles are made in other places in the world. Textiles and the web have intimate connections in other ways too- weaving has been described as the first computer, a series of 0s and 1s that describe information. I would also love to point out that technology and textiles are connected by us as human beings- both textiles and technology are created and maintained with human hands in conjunction with machines. The mark of the hand and the mark of the machine are both very important to everything we make as humans in this world now. We would not have textiles without the technology of the loom and spindle, we would not have the web without the technology also created by humans. So all of my work contains both the mark of the hand and the mark of the machine, and those connections are all inherent and present in the work.

Touching From A Distance, 2020. 42” x 30”. Fabric, thread, fringe, sequins. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Touching From A Distance-detail, 2020. 42” x 30”. Fabric, thread, fringe, sequins. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

How has your work changed during these last two years in which the pandemic has altered our daily lives?

My work has been about connection for many years, but now I think there is more of a focus on how important those connections are, and how to sustain them when we can’t physically touch. I find myself making work that considers how I connect to myself as well, rather than connections between myself and those outside me. The pandemic has created a need to find solace on an inner level, and to figure out the balance between loneliness and being alone. We can be alone, together. But loneliness is different. And I think that is something I’ve been thinking a lot about these past few years.

Keeps Us Together, 2020. 60” x 70”. Fabric, fringe, cord, plastic, embroidery. Photo By John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Keeps Us Together-detail, 2020. 60” x 70”. Fabric, fringe, cord, plastic, embroidery. Photo By John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

What role does color play in your practice and your work?

To me, color is nature. We see beautiful sunsets, flowers, trees, everything in nature is about color. I also think about the idea of spiritual work and connection, and how color is tied to that. You can “open your mind” through psychedelics, which change your experience of colors and patterns while also changing how you know yourself and your connection to the world and to others. Color is also related to our histories- certain colors that could only be worn by royalty, for example, or colors that were and are sacred in religious beliefs. In my personal experience, I am synesthetic, and my synesthesia is most apparent when I am reading text. Each letter has a colored “aura” behind it, such as pink for “a” or deep blue for “e”. Reading has always been a part of my life and the way that I learn information, and I believe that is in part because of the colors behind the words. I feel that color plays a major role in how we experience the world around us and in our emotional states, and this is why I use an abundance of color in my work.

Infinite Rainbow Divided By Zero, 2019. 40” x 37”. Fabric, batting, yarn, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Infinite Rainbow Divided By Zero-detail, 2019. 40” x 37”. Fabric, batting, yarn, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

What are you working on at the moment?

I am currently working on a new body of work for my solo show in July 2022 at a gallery here in Portland, Wellwell Projects. I will be debuting new work, and am taking techniques I explored through my project at Meta Open Arts to a new level. There will be more landscape influenced work in this show, and more work exploring my relationship to myself and my inner core. I am really excited to make more meditative work that the viewer can stay with for longer than a glance and see new things each moment.

Interviste

Andrea Alonge

*Foto in evidenza: Reality Is Duality-detail, 2020. 50” x 56”. Fabric, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Superfici cangianti e multicolori, texture scintillanti e illusioni ottiche sono solo alcuni degli aspetti che caratterizzano le opere tessili di Andrea Alonge e che colpiscono l’attenzione dello spettatore. Oltrepassata la soglia di questo primo impatto, quasi giocoso e certamente stimolante, il lavoro mostra un contenuto e un intento più spirituale che si manifesta attraverso l’uso di simboli e forme che permettono  all’artista di esplorare il tema delle relazioni umane e della connessione tra uomo, natura, società e Universo:  “A thought that comforts me is the idea of our connections to everything through our chemical makeup- we are made up of the water, and the same elements as the stars and the trees, and the air that we breathe, and our universal consciousness. We are all touching. We will touch forever

Andrea Alonge, originaria di Mesa, Arizona, si è formata presso la School of the Art Institute of Chicago e ha conseguito il Master’s of Fine Arts alla Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Attualmente vive e lavora a Portland, Oregon.

http://www.andreaalonge.com/

Reality Is Duality, 2020. 50” x 56”. Fabric, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Come ti sei avvicinata all’arte? Qual’ è stato il tuo percorso e come sei entrata in contatto con il mezzo tessile?

Ho iniziato a fare arte da quando ero bambina, concentrandomi in particolare sulla scultura e sul lavoro tridimensionale. Ho iniziato a fare case e mobili per le bambole all’età di 8 anni. Quando sono entrata al liceo (scuola secondaria), ho frequentato un corso di ceramica e mi è piaciuto molto.

Un giorno, il mio insegnante ha guardato il mio lavoro e mi ha detto: “Potresti pensare di fare questo al college”. Non ci avevo mai pensato prima, ma la prospettiva era molto eccitante e ho scelto di conseguire una laurea in arte con specializzazione in ceramica. Dopo essere stata a scuola per tre anni, mi sono presa una pausa, durante la quale mi sono resa conto che pur amando la ceramica, era un mezzo che richiedeva un sacco di attrezzature specializzate e uno spazio dedicato alla creta.

Sono cresciuta con un genitore che amava i tessuti, sapevo cucire ed era qualcosa che avevamo fatto insieme. Ho iniziato a pensare ai tessuti come un mezzo espressivo che, a lungo termine, sarebbe stato più adatto alle mie esigenze. Possedevo una macchina da cucire che poteva essere usata in un piccolo appartamento, senza aver bisogno di uno studio. Tornata a scuola, alla School of The Art Institute of Chicago, ho ottenuto un BFA; in questo istituto ho anche seguito molti corsi presso il dipartimento di studi della fibra e dei materiali e alla fine tutto il mio lavoro si è condensato in opere tessili, nonostante abbia continuato a fare ceramiche anche durante la mia specializzazione.

Quando mi sono laureata al SAIC, sono stata accettata nel dipartimento tessile alla Cranbrook Academy of Art, la maggior parte del lavoro che ho realizzato lì era di tipo tessile. Sono molto interessata alla storia, alla critica, al tessile e all’artigianato in senso lato. Questo mezzo è perfetto per me e per le storie che racconto e che spero di continuare a raccontare. I tessuti si possono toccare, sono associati al tatto e all’uso e formano la struttura delle nostre giornate: indossiamo vestiti, dormiamo nelle lenzuola, ci circondiamo di tessuti. Le stoffe sono pregne di storia – la trapunta della nonna, i vestiti ai quali leghiamo dei ricordi, le cose che sono successe mentre li indossavamo, i tessuti vintage che rimandano alle epoche in cui sono stati creati. Penso ai tessuti come a oggetti in grado di connetterci. Siamo collegati alle persone che hanno fatto i nostri vestiti, che ne hanno prodotto la stoffa.

We Belong Together, 2021. View. 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Can See The Stars In All Directions, 2018. 37” x 52”. Found fabrics, chain, sequins, thread, trim, embroidery, plastic. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Can See The Stars In All Directions-detail, 2018. 37” x 52”. Found fabrics, chain, sequins, thread, trim, embroidery, plastic. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

We Belong Together. Puoi dirci qualcosa di questo progetto, com’è nato e di cosa si tratta?

Questo progetto è stato commissionato da Meta Open Arts, che è un programma fondato da Meta per portare artisti a creare lavori per gli edifici dei dipendenti Meta nel territorio. Nel 2021, sono stata contattata da Meta per creare un progetto per un edificio nella regione di Seattle. Ho cominciato a pensare ai tessuti come connessione, e a come potevo usarli come metafora delle connessioni di internet e dei social media. Come ci mettiamo in contatto attraverso i social media? Il primo elemento identificativo di internet è il World Wide Web: come posso immaginare le sembianze di questa rete? Che aspetto hanno le informazioni mentre viaggiano da me a te? Penso all’informazione come all’acqua: scorre da una fonte, attraverso tubi e tubature, può essere pulita o inquinata, può scorrere lontano e diffondersi ampiamente, o può essere convogliata. Ho pensato molto ai modi in cui entriamo in contatto, sia positivi che negativi, e all’infrastruttura fisica che rende possibile la connessione dei social media. Nella nostra epoca, in cui possiamo comunicare attraverso il web e i social media, siamo tutti in contatto, che lo vogliamo o no. In tutti gli uffici di Meta, ci sono cartelli con il loro motto: “più forti insieme”, e ho pensato a questo quando ho installato i pezzi e dato il nome all’opera. C’è una canzone di Pat Benatar che dice “qualunque cosa rifiutiamo o abbracciamo/ nel male o nel bene/ apparteniamo/ apparteniamo insieme” e penso che esprima perfettamente la natura dei social media. Siamo tutti qui insieme, connessi in questo mondo attraverso diverse modalità, alcuni dei modi in cui ci connettiamo sono negativi e alcuni sono positivi, ma non c’è modo di disconnettersi. Siamo tutti insieme, e siamo fatti per stare insieme.

We Belong Together, 2021. View. 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Belong Together, 2021. View. 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Belong Together-detail, 2021, 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge
We Belong Together-detail, 2021, 35’ x 8’. Fabric, chain, tinsel, grommets, plastic, yarn, cord, thread. Photos by Dominic Nieri, copyright Andrea Alonge

Quanto è importante l’improvvisazione nel tuo lavoro? E qual è la tua fonte di ispirazione oggi?

L’improvvisazione è una parte importante del mio lavoro ed aiuta le mie idee a prendere forma. Fin dalla scuola di specializzazione a Cranbrook, ho capito che i disegni dei tessuti e i manufatti tessili avrebbero giocato un ruolo importante nel dare forma ai miei lavori.

Per esempio, se vedo un motivo che mi ricorda un muro di mattoni, il pezzo che farò nascerà da quell’idea di muro. Questo è quello che è successo quando ho realizzato l’opera “Sometimes When We Touch”, che si ispira vagamente alla storia di Piramo e Tisbe, amanti e vicini che erano separati l’uno dall’altra dal muro tra le case dei loro genitori.

Penso ai disegni su tessuto come a uno strumento per creare segni, disegnando linee con le strisce o mescolando tessuti floreali per creare un campo di fiori. Sento anche che è importante alterare le stoffe con dei segni personali. In qualche modo, arricchendo la superficie con il quilting o il ricamo o il yarn-tying, sono in grado di dissimulare il disegno originale della stoffa e rendere l’opera mia. La mia attuale fonte d’ispirazione sono i simboli universali come cerchi, spirali, triangoli, cubi e segni d’infinito. Questi simboli sono stati usati fin dall’antichità; mi interessa come vengono letti oggi e come posso collegarli al mondo in cui viviamo. Questi simboli ci hanno messi in comunicazione fin dalla preistoria, erano modi per lasciare messaggi o per esprimere le nostre verità.

Sometimes When We Touch, 2019. 46” x 42”. Fabric, trim, embroidery, appliqué. Photo By John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Sometimes When We Touch-detail, 2019. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

C’è un lavoro o un progetto a cui ti senti particolarmente legata o che ha avuto un ruolo significativo nel tuo percorso personale e/o professionale?

Sono particolarmente legata a un lavoro che ho fatto nel 2020 chiamato “The Beach Is Within Me”.

Durante la pandemia, io, come molti altri, ero isolata e al chiuso, e volevo fare un’opera che mi desse conforto. Qualche anno fa, lavoravo in un negozio di alimentari, e una delle mie clienti abituali mi chiedeva spesso come stavo. Io rispondevo quasi sempre: “vorrei essere in spiaggia”, che è, per me, un posto calmo e felice. Lei rispondeva “la spiaggia è dentro di te, Andrea”. Per me questo era un promemoria perfetto per ricordarmi che la calma, il centro immobile è dentro di me, come è dentro tutti noi. Abbiamo tutti la capacità di guardarci dentro e trovare il nostro centro. Quando la pandemia ci ha colpito e ha continuato a trascinarsi, ho cominciato a pensare sempre di più a questa idea – che dobbiamo trovare questo posto dentro di noi per poter andare avanti e continuare a vivere anche di fronte alla morte. Quest’opera è stata la mia risposta alla situazione; è uno dei lavori più meditativi che ho fatto, e lo amo.

The Beach Is Within Me, 2020. 48” diameter. Fabric, yarn, pompoms, batting. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Oggi i social network offrono una possibilità di connessione continua con un pubblico molto vasto. Come artista, come vivi il tuo rapporto con il web?

Trovo che il web sia estremamente interessante, e fin dalla scuola di specializzazione ho sempre studiato e pensato ai social network e alla nostra connessione attraverso il web. Mentre il mio lavoro è tangibile, sono interessata a come esso abiti uno spazio virtuale e si traduca per un pubblico digitale. Il mio lavoro è difficile da fotografare – un sacco di scintillii, glitter, piccole strisce che risultano deformate quando vengono mostrate su uno schermo. Mi piace che il mio lavoro cambi nei diversi formati: può essere una cosa quando lo si guarda di persona e un’altra quando lo si guarda sullo schermo. Questa mi sembra una metafora appropriata: le nostre vite sui social media o nel regno virtuale sono un punto di vista, una visione pesantemente curata, mentre le nostre vite personali sono più complesse e a volte completamente diverse.

Sono anche interessata all’aspetto macro/micro del lavoro, e spesso realizzo le opere in modo che ci siano ricompense per chi le guarda da vicino, un piccolo bonus per coloro che possono vederle di persona. Sento che il web è stato molto utile per sviluppare il mio lavoro; posso raggiungere più persone con le mie opere di quanto sarei stata in grado di fare se le avessero viste solo dal vivo. Sto parlando con voi ora, probabilmente perché avete visto il mio lavoro online, e non perché l’avete visto di persona. Tuttavia apprezzo molto la possibilità di comunicare con tutto il mondo, e di poter vedere opere d’arte che non avrei visto di persona. Sento anche che i tessili stessi sono rappresentativi delle connessioni globali tramite il loro processo di produzione – molti dei nostri materiali tessili sono fatti in altri luoghi del mondo.

Touching From A Distance, 2020. 42” x 30”. Fabric, thread, fringe, sequins. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Touching From A Distance-detail, 2020. 42” x 30”. Fabric, thread, fringe, sequins. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Come è cambiato il tuo lavoro in questi ultimi due anni in cui la pandemia ha modificato la vita quotidiana?

Il mio lavoro si è concentrato per molti anni sulle connessioni, ma ora penso che ci sia una maggiore attenzione al valore di queste reti, e a come sostenerle quando non possiamo toccarci fisicamente. Mi scopro a fare lavori che prendono in considerazione anche il modo in cui mi connetto con me stessa, piuttosto che le connessioni tra me e quelli al di fuori di me. La pandemia ha creato la necessità di trovare conforto a livello interiore, e di cercare l’equilibrio tra la solitudine e l’essere soli. Possiamo essere soli anche insieme. Ma la solitudine è diversa. E credo che sia qualcosa a cui ho pensato molto negli ultimi anni.

Keeps Us Together, 2020. 60” x 70”. Fabric, fringe, cord, plastic, embroidery. Photo By John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Keeps Us Together-detail, 2020. 60” x 70”. Fabric, fringe, cord, plastic, embroidery. Photo By John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

Che ruolo ha il colore nel tuo lavoro e nella tua pratica artistica?

Per me, il colore è la natura. Vediamo bellissimi tramonti, fiori, alberi, tutto in natura è colore. Penso anche all’idea di lavoro spirituale e connessione, e a come il colore sia legato a questo. Puoi “aprire la tua mente” attraverso le sostanze psichedeliche, che cambiano la tua esperienza dei colori e dei pattern e allo stesso tempo cambiano il modo in cui conosci te stesso e la tua relazione con il mondo e con gli altri. Il colore è anche legato alla storia – certi colori potevano essere indossati solo dai reali, per esempio, o erano e sono sacri nelle credenze religiose. Per quanto riguarda la mia esperienza personale, io percepisco in maniera sinestetica, e la mia sinestesia è più marcata quando leggo un testo. Ogni lettera ha un'”aura” colorata, ad esempio il rosa per la “a” o il blu profondo per la “e”. La lettura è sempre stata una parte della mia vita, il modo in cui imparo le informazioni e credo che questo sia in parte dovuto ai colori delle parole. Sento che il colore gioca un ruolo importante nel modo in cui sperimentiamo il mondo intorno a noi e per i nostri stati emotivi, e questo è il motivo per cui uso un’abbondanza di colore nel mio lavoro.

Infinite Rainbow Divided By Zero, 2019. 40” x 37”. Fabric, batting, yarn, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge
Infinite Rainbow Divided By Zero-detail, 2019. 40” x 37”. Fabric, batting, yarn, trim, embroidery. Photo by John Whitten, copyright Andrea Alonge

A cosa stai lavorando al momento?

Attualmente sto lavorando su una nuova serie di opere per la mia mostra personale nel luglio 2022 in una galleria qui a Portland, Wellwell Projects. Debutterò con un nuovo lavoro, e sto portando le tecniche che ho esplorato con il mio progetto a Meta Open Arts ad un nuovo livello. In questa mostra ci sarà molto lavoro influenzato dal paesaggio, e ancora più lavoro che esplora la mia relazione con me stessa e il mio nucleo interiore. Sono davvero entusiasta di creare opere più meditative con cui lo spettatore possa rimanere per più di uno sguardo e vedere cose nuove ogni momento.

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.