Interview

CAMILLA BRENT PEARCE

*Fetured photo: Continuo.   2021. 30 ¼ “ w x 26” h (including fringe). Vintage silk, cotton batting, wool. Rust and eco-dyed, handstitched with silk and metallic threads.  Sewing needle.  2021. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce


Pittsburgh-based fibre artist Camilla Brent Pearce graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute and received her MFA in painting from Washington University in St. Louis.

After her training, Pearce finds her voice in textiles, favouring a process that allows her to partially free herself from the purely formal aspects of artistic creation. In doing so, she leaves room for the possibility of entering into a personal and emotional dialogue with the materials, thus becoming the artist’s language of expression.

Her work has been exhibited internationally and across the U.S., including the Milwaukee Art Museum, the Parliament House in Sydney, Australia, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Canton Museum of Art, Society for Contemporary Craft and the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. In addition, her artworks are included in the permanent collections of the University of Wisconsin/Madison and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

With Continuo, Pearce is currently exhibiting at Fiberart International 2022, a major international fibre art event. In this interview, among other subjects, the artist talks about the genesis and development of this personal and meditative work and the theme it addresses.

Paisley Handkerchief, 2016. 11” x 11”. 2016. Vintage linen handkerchief. Silk thread.Photo silkscreen of artist’s original artwork on fabric, hand-stitched with silk sewing thread. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

How and when did you get into textile art? What was your training path?

My mother sewed, knitted, and was a quilter. She taught me to sew at age 8 or 9 and I have continued (time permitting) making a significant portion of my own clothing, considering it another creative outlet in addition to artmaking.  My father was an architect, and his father was an interior designer, so art, design and making is part of the family DNA.

I started at the Cleveland Art Institute (Cleveland, OH) my hometown – focusing on traditional, representational studio art, with a minor in Fibers (under Wenda von Weise and Jane Sari Berger)   I completed my BFA in Fiber at the Kansas City Art Institute with Jason Pollen (Surface Design) and Jane Lackey (Weaving.)  While at KCAI I took a number of printmaking, papermaking and drawing electives and incorporated those processes into my work in fiber.

After much consideration (Art V Craft)  I pursued a Masters in Fine Art in Painting at Washington University in St. Louis, MO, studying w James McGarrell and Martin Ball. I was making large organically inspired abstract paintings but after my first  year of the two-year program had a “crisis of faith” and threw the entire year’s body of work in the dumpster as I cleaned out my studio for the summer.  While a huge waste of materials this was an incredibly cathartic and was exactly the reset needed to find a process and voice more true to myself – combining fiber, sewing, ceramics, text, collage and found materials.  At the same time the work benefitted from a more critical/conceptual rigor rather than simply focusing on formal concerns. This has been helpful moving forward, especially working in a medium that is process focused and labor intensive to not get lost entirely in process.

Paisley Handkerchief-detail, 2016. 11” x 11”. 2016. Vintage linen handkerchief. Silk thread.Photo silkscreen of artist’s original artwork on fabric, hand-stitched with silk sewing thread. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

How and when did you get into textile art? What was your training path?

My mother sewed, knitted, and was a quilter. She taught me to sew at age 8 or 9 and I have continued (time permitting) making a significant portion of my own clothing, considering it another creative outlet in addition to artmaking.  My father was an architect, and his father was an interior designer, so art, design and making is part of the family DNA.

I started at the Cleveland Art Institute (Cleveland, OH) my hometown – focusing on traditional, representational studio art, with a minor in Fibers (under Wenda von Weise and Jane Sari Berger)   I completed my BFA in Fiber at the Kansas City Art Institute with Jason Pollen (Surface Design) and Jane Lackey (Weaving.)  While at KCAI I took a number of printmaking, papermaking and drawing electives and incorporated those processes into my work in fiber.

After much consideration (Art V Craft)  I pursued a Masters in Fine Art in Painting at Washington University in St. Louis, MO, studying w James McGarrell and Martin Ball. I was making large organically inspired abstract paintings but after my first  year of the two-year program had a “crisis of faith” and threw the entire year’s body of work in the dumpster as I cleaned out my studio for the summer.  While a huge waste of materials this was an incredibly cathartic and was exactly the reset needed to find a process and voice more true to myself – combining fiber, sewing, ceramics, text, collage and found materials.  At the same time the work benefitted from a more critical/conceptual rigor rather than simply focusing on formal concerns. This has been helpful moving forward, especially working in a medium that is process focused and labor intensive to not get lost entirely in process.

Rustbelt Paisley, 2012. 13” x 17”. Cotton, silk, chiffon. Rust-dyed. Handstitched with silk and metallic sewing thread. Photo Credit: Bob George/ Pittsburgh Custom Darkroom, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Rustbelt Paisley-detail, 2012. 13” x 17”. Cotton, silk, chiffon. Rust-dyed. Handstitched with silk and metallic sewing thread. Photo Credit: Bob George/ Pittsburgh Custom Darkroom, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Grand Avenue Rustbelt Flower Garden. 2014. 14 ¾” h x 14 3/8” w. Vintage silk kimono; Victorian lace. Rustdyed, handstitched w silk and cotton sewing thread. Micron pen drawing. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Grand Avenue Rustbelt Flower Garden. 2014. 14 ¾” h x 14 3/8” w. Vintage silk kimono; Victorian lace. Rustdyed, handstitched w silk and cotton sewing thread. Micron pen drawing. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

With the work Continuo you are participating in Fiberart International 2022. Can you tell us about its genesis and significance?

Continuo is a very personal work.  I started rust and eco-dyeing in the early 00’s, inspired by a fellow member of the Fiberarts Guild. Instead of using steaming and mordants for immediate results I was more concerned with marking over time, and often would wrap metal with salt-soaked fabric and leave in tea or coffee baths for days or weeks, rewrapping the material to change the transfer pattern of the rusted metal.  This was the process I used for the top silk layer of Continuo.  It is layered silk, batting and wool, with a silver grid overlaid (inspired by Agnes Martin’s field paintings and Lenore Tawney’s ink drawings.   The fill stitching is silk, all done by hand.  It is very labor-intensive, but I have not found a substitute mechanical process that gives the same feel and look to the work.  I also find the stitching to be very meditative and once the pattern is established, I can stitch (since it is a simple running stitch) practically anywhere there is enough light, since the work is quite portable, and usually work while watching television or listening to podcasts or books on tape.

For more background – here is the statement included with the submission to Fiberart International.  An edited version is the statement in the exhibition catalog.

Continuo – Take 1
My work is about time and process. The two are intertwined – time is referenced not only in the materials used (salvaged antique kimono, upholstery fabric and vintage clothes) – but also the processes and tools involved. The element of time also factors into my chosen working methods –hand-stitching and rust-dyeing. I am attracted to materials that have a past history— often they are worn, and patched, showing the former life of the fabric. Rather than eliminating the patches and darns I choose to highlight them – making them a point of interest.
Originally, I started incorporating stitching in my work to reference traditional quilt-making. The running stitch is used in functional quilts to create a third layer of pattern (in addition to the design of the quilt and the print of the fabrics included). In early work on this theme I used the running stitch as decoration, and as a tool to “quote” traditional quilt patterns. In more recent work the piece is entirely covered with these dense running stitches, so the stitching creates not only a texture, but a color field. Although this could be done with a sewing machine I feel strongly that the hand has to be evident in the work, and the quality of hand-stitching is totally different than anything done through mechanical means. The investment of time spent stitching in its own way also pays homage to the history inherent in the found fabrics I use, and in many instances to the person it had originally belonged to.

Continuo. 2021. 30 ¼ “ w x 26” h (including fringe). Vintage silk, cotton batting, wool. Rust and eco-dyed, handstitched with silk and metallic threads. Sewing needle. 2021. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

Continuo – Take 2
August 30, 2021 would have been our 19th Anniversary, had my husband lived past age 42. This piece was started in 2005 (the era of the artist statement above), and completed in in August this year after a hiatus not only from this piece but from artmaking in general. I know myself enough by now to know that once started I need to complete things. Books, movies – relationships. Even if I hate the characters or the writing, or in the case of Dan – the ending. Continuo (titled for the ongoing email conversation using the same thread we kept going throughout our marriage) is the largest whole cloth stitched piece I’ve attempted. It was my constant companion – part security blanket, part make work to keep hands and mind busy while sitting in a succession of hospital and hospice rooms, first with both parents in Cleveland and then Pittsburgh with him. Afterwards, as much as I loved the piece, it was just too specific. With no end in sight, but not ready to toss it (once started/must finish) I put it – same ratty Ziploc bag, thread and needle in mid-stitch – in a drawer. It got pulled out occasionally –anniversaries mostly- testing my stomach to return to the work. Listening for whether it spoke differently this time. When it didn’t, back in the drawer. In subsequent years – no matter whether wildly busy, creativity focused on making other things or through what seemed to be an interminable art dry spell of the past several years – it maintained its radio silence. Until recently.
The past few weeks have been a marathon – too little sleep and incredibly sore hands, but finally at a stopping point. With so much in life having changed since starting in 2005 – the process for its completion was different too. Still stitching – my familiar- but more riff like Dan’s jazz sax playing-loosening the grip of the tiny stitches from Part I which were beautiful but ultimately unsustainable. The needle is still there in mid-stitch, the decision whether to tidy up the ending or to leave loose ends hanging was a conscious decision. Art imitating life? Check. One WIP down. Check. Two? Maybe.

Continuo-detail 2021. 30 ¼ “ w x 26” h (including fringe). Vintage silk, cotton batting, wool. Rust and eco-dyed, handstitched with silk and metallic threads. Sewing needle. 2021. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

Are there any contemporary artists that you feel are close to your research and language?

So many, but to name a few – I I appreciate the work of Dorothy Caldwell and India Flint for their exploration into of non-traditional mark making and colorations, Kusama for her obsessive patterning and dedication to a focused way of working, El Anatsui in his creative reuse of discarded materials into things of beauty.

Untitled, 2020. 14” x 13.5”. Mixed media: vintage handkerchief, recycled commercially printed fabric; photo-silkscreen, acrylic, micron pen. Handstitched with cotton and silk sewing thread. Photo Credit: Camilla Brent Pearce

What is a typical day in your studio like?

I can’t say there is a “typical” day in my studio since I am balancing artmaking with a fulltime job not in the visual arts,  (I am a fundraiser with the Pittsburgh Symphony), so art is done in bursts.   I am coming out of an extended artistic dry spell – besides a piece made for an exhibition which went up the week before COVID which never had an audience past the opening- Continuo is the first piece I had made in several years.  I was still sewing garments (30 during COVID and still counting)  and taking pictures for creative oulets in addition to an everchanging perennial garden, but did not focus on object making or fiber work.  My practice is usually to have several pieces going at the same time – I’ll spend an afternoon or full day putting fabrics together – sorting, ironing, then establishing the layers and the concept for the stitching, so the thought work is done in a focused block, and the actual stitching can happen time permitting.

Untitled-detail, 2020. 14” x 13.5”. Mixed media: vintage handkerchief, recycled commercially printed fabric; photo-silkscreen, acrylic, micron pen. Handstitched with cotton and silk sewing thread. Photo Credit: Camilla Brent Pearce

How important is it for an artist to have access to a prestigious event like Fiberart International?

I find having access to exhibitions like Fiberart International (whether as a participant or viewer) is very important.  As a member of the Fiberarts Guild (and volunteer in various capacities for the exhibition over the years) it is gratifying to see the enthusiasm with which the show is received, and the quality and breadth of work being made world-wide.  It highlights the vitality and innovation of the field and artists pushing the traditional boundaries of what is fiber and how it is used.

Y or Why or ?... BECAUSE 2013. 11 ½ w x 11 7/8” h. Tea-dyed vintage linen. Monogram embroidery transfers, handstitched w silk sewing thread. Micron pen drawing. Photo Credit: Polly Whitehorn, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Y or Why or ?... BECAUSE-detail 2013. 11 ½ w x 11 7/8” h. Tea-dyed vintage linen. Monogram embroidery transfers, handstitched w silk sewing thread. Micron pen drawing. Photo Credit: Polly Whitehorn, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

A work or project that you are particularly attached to or that has played an important role in your professional development?

Hard to choose one – there are many for different reasons, but I guess Continuo is that for me.  I have found that I work best when there is a combination of formal and conceptual elements to a work, but a deep personal connection to the materials or the person they belonged to as an emotional base.  In most cases it is not terribly important to me that the viewer is keyed into the personal story behind the materials, or the prior owner if they engage with the work on any of the other levels.  In rare cases – an example, I made a series of stitched pieces using cotton from my husband’s boxer briefs (he had a fondness for wacky patterns and when they were too thin to wear, they went into my recycle pile.)  The series was titled the Boxer Rebellion Series which requrired a bit of a backstory.   My heart has been on my sleeve with Continuo – and it was helpful in both its making and through its completion as solace and biting through to a more regular art practice.

Continuo-detail 2021. 30 ¼ “ w x 26” h (including fringe). Vintage silk, cotton batting, wool. Rust and eco-dyed, handstitched with silk and metallic threads. Sewing needle. 2021. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

What are you working on at the moment?

I currently have two stitched pieces in process  – one very large piece (4 x 6’)  that is still in design/concept phase, so the work is quite slow.  It combines rust and coffee-dyed silk chiffon over a linen panel with an oriental floral design salvaged from my grandfather’s interior design firm.  I’ve been filling in the pattern with very fine running stitches and intend to use silver metallic threads in the background.  I’m loving the flowing edges of the chiffon in combination with the sinewy lines of the vines and branches in the pattern, so in addition to the stitching fill work am also grappling with presentation and edges.   I am also considering adding free form drawing on  top of the layers but am not ready to commit yet.

The other is a small piece combining cotton organza photo silkscreened with a lace pattern and linen.  I intend to draw back into/over the piece once the entire surface is stitched.  Since I’m at the “fill stage” the stitching is kind of a no-brainer, and its nice to have something small that I can throw in a baggie and take with me wherever I go and have a few minutes.

Interviste

CAMILLA BRENT PEARCE

*Foto in evidenza: Continuo. 2021. Larghezza 30 ¼ ” x altezza 26″ (frangia compresa). Seta vintage, ovatta di cotone, lana. Tinto con Ruggine ed eco-tinta, cucito a mano con fili di seta e metallici.  Ago da cucito.  2021. Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce


Fiber artist originaria di Pittsburgh, Camilla Brent Pearce, si è laureata presso il Kansas City Art Institute e ha conseguito l’MFA in pittura alla Washington University di St. Louis.
Dopo un percorso di formazione come pittrice, Pearce trova la propria voce nei tessuti mostrando di prediligere un  processo che le permette di svincolarsi in parte dagli aspetti prettamente formali della creazione artistica, per lasciare spazio alla possibilità di approfondire un dialogo personale ed emotivo con i materiali che diventano così il linguaggio attraverso cui l’artista si esprime.
Le sue opere sono state esposte a livello internazionale e negli Stati Uniti, tra cui il Milwaukee Art Museum, la Parliament House di Sydney in Australia, il Cleveland Museum of Art, il Canton Museum of Art, la Society for Contemporary Craft e il Pittsburgh Center for the Arts e sono incluse nelle collezioni permanenti dell’Università del Wisconsin/Madison e del Cleveland Museum of Art.
Con Continuo, Pearce è attualmente in mostra al Fiberart International 2022, importante evento dedicato alla fiber art internazionale. In questa intervista l’artista racconta, tra le altre cose, la genesi e lo sviluppo di quest’opera personale e meditativa e del tema che affronta.

Paisley Handkerchief, 2016. 11" x 11". 2016. Fazzoletto di lino vintage. Filo di seta. Serigrafia su tessuto di un'opera d'arte originale dell'artista, cucita a mano con filo di seta. Photo Credit: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

Come e quando sei entrata in contatto con l’arte tessile? Qual è stato il tuo percorso formativo?

Mia mamma cuciva, lavorava a maglia e era una quilter. All’ età di 8 o 9 anni mi ha insegnato a cucire e ho continuato (tempo permettendo) a confezionare buona parte dei miei abiti, considerandoli un altro sbocco creativo oltre a quello artistico.  Mio padre era un architetto e suo padre un designer d’interni, quindi l’arte, il design e la creazione fanno parte del DNA della mia famiglia.

Ho iniziato a frequentare il Cleveland Art Institute (Cleveland, OH), la mia città natale, dedicandomi all’arte tradizionale e figurativa, con il tessile come materia complementare (sotto la guida di Wenda von Weise e Jane Sari Berger). Ho completato il mio BFA in Fiber all’Istituto d’Arte di Kansas City con Jason Pollen (Surface Design) e Jane Lackey (Tessitura). Mentre frequentavo il KCAI, ho seguito una serie di corsi facoltativi di stampa, fabbricazione della carta e disegno e ho incorporato questi processi nel mio lavoro con le fibre. Dopo aver considerato a fondo la dicotomia Arte / Artigianato, ho ottenuto un Master in Fine Art in Pittura alla Washington University di St. Louis, MO, studiando con James McGarrell e Martin Ball. Allora realizzavo grandi dipinti astratti di ispirazione organica, ma dopo il primo anno del corso biennale ho avuto una crisi e ho gettato l’intero lavoro di un anno nella spazzatura mentre ripulivo il mio studio per l’estate.  Sebbene sia stato un enorme spreco di materiali, è stato incredibilmente catartico e ha rappresentato il reset necessario. Combinando fibre, cucito, ceramica, testo, collage e materiali di recupero, ho trovato un processo e una voce più fedeli a me stessa.  Allo stesso tempo, il lavoro si è arricchito di un maggior rigore critico/concettuale, invece di concentrarsi semplicemente sulle questioni formali. Questo è stato utile per andare avanti e non perdersi completamente nel processo, soprattutto perché lavoro con un medium che è focalizzato sul procedimento e che richiede molta manodopera.

Paisley Handkerchief-detail, 2016. 11" x 11". 2016. Fazzoletto di lino vintage. Filo di seta. Serigrafia su tessuto di un'opera d'arte originale dell'artista, cucita a mano con filo di seta. Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce.

Qual è la tua principale fonte di ispirazione? La tradizione americana del quilt è influente nella tua pratica?

La mia ispirazione proviene da fonti differenti – mi rifaccio al lavoro di molti artisti – Agnes Martin, Louise Bourgeois, Eva Hesse, Paul Klee, Anni Albers, Lenore Tawney, solo per citarne alcuni.

Dopo la scuola di specializzazione, ho iniziato a realizzare quilt a tecnica mista adottando modelli tradizionali. Il loro nome e la loro storia, oltre che dal loro design, mi incuriosiva; come per esempio, 54/40/or Fight, Drunkard’s Path, Churn Dash e Flying Geese. Ho combinato questi pattern con tessuti vintage, spesso con kimono giapponesi che ho inserito tra strati di carta da lucido usata per il disegno architettonico.  Omaggiando comunque la storia e il processo del patchwork tradizionale, i miei disegni erano cuciti sulla carta.  Molti processi tradizionali di quiltmaking sono nati dalla necessità di utilizzare/riciclare in più modi ogni scampolo di tessuto. Trovo che usare materiali che hanno avuto una vita precedente e che mostrano le tracce del tempo (strappi, rattoppi, rammendi) sia più accattivante (e stimolante) che iniziare con una nuova tela bianca.

Rustbelt Paisley, 2012. 13" x 17". Cotone, seta, chiffon. Tinto con la ruggine. Cucito a mano con seta e filo metallico. Foto: Bob George/Pittsburgh Custom Darkroom, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Rustbelt Paisley Dettaglio, 2012. 13" x 17". Cotone, seta, chiffon. Tinto con la ruggine. Cucito a mano con seta e filo metallico. Foto: Bob George/Pittsburgh Custom Darkroom, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Grand Avenue Rustbelt Flower Garden. 2014. Altezza 14 ¾" x Larghezza 14 3/8". Kimono di seta vintage; pizzo vittoriano. Tinto con la ruggine, cucito a mano con filo da cucito di seta e cotone. Disegno a penna Micron. Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Grand Avenue Rustbelt Flower Garden. 2014. Altezza 14 ¾" x Larghezza 14 3/8". Kimono di seta vintage; pizzo vittoriano. Tinto con la ruggine, cucito a mano con filo di seta e cotone. Disegno a penna micron. Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

La tua opera Continuo è esposta a Fiber Art International 2022. Puoi parlarci della sua genesi e del suo significato?

Continuo è un lavoro molto personale.  Nei primi anni ’00 ho iniziato a lavorare con la tintura di ruggine e ecologica, ispirata da un collega della Fiberarts Guild. Invece di usare vapore e mordenti per ottenere risultati immediati ero più interessata alle tracce lasciate col passare del tempo. Spesso avvolgevo il metallo con un tessuto imbevuto di sale e lo lasciavo in bagni di tè o caffè per giorni o settimane. Spesso riavvolgevo il materiale per modificare il disegno che il metallo arrugginito avrebbe creato trasferendo la sua forma sul tessuto.  Questo è il processo che ho utilizzato per creare lo strato di seta esterno di Continuo che è composto da strati di seta, ovatta e lana, con sovrapposta una griglia d’argento (ispirata alla serie “field” di Agnes Martin e ai disegni a inchiostro di Lenore Tawney).  Le cuciture di riempimento sono in seta e sono tutte realizzate a mano.  Nonostante sia un lavoro molto impegnativo, non ho trovato un processo meccanico sostitutivo col quale ottenere lo stesso aspetto e la stessa sensazione.  Inoltre, trovo che il cucito sia molto meditativo e, una volta stabilito il disegno, posso ricamare (dato che si tratta di un semplice punto filza) praticamente ovunque ci sia abbastanza luce, considerando che il lavoro è anche facilmente trasportabile. Solitamente lavoro mentre guardo la televisione o ascolto podcast o audiolibri.

Per ulteriori approfondimenti, ecco il testo legato all’opera incluso nella domanda di partecipazione a Fiberart International.  Una versione modificata è contenuta nel catalogo della mostra.

Continuo – Parte I

Il mio lavoro è incentrato sul tempo e sul processo. Le due cose si intrecciano: il tempo è riferito non solo ai materiali utilizzati (kimono antichi di seconda mano, tessuti per tappezzeria e abiti vintage), ma anche ai processi e agli strumenti coinvolti. L’elemento del tempo è presente anche nel metodo di lavoro che ho scelto: la cucitura a mano e la tintura con la ruggine. Sono attratta dai materiali che hanno una storia passata, spesso usurati e rattoppati, che mostrano la vita precedente del tessuto. Piuttosto che eliminare le toppe e i rammendi, scelgo di metterli in evidenza, rendendoli punti di interesse.

Originariamente, ho voluto incorporare le cuciture nel mio lavoro per fare riferimento alla lavorazione tradizionale del quilt. Il punto filza viene utilizzato nei quilt tradizionali per creare un terzo strato di pattern decorativi (oltre al design del quilt e alla stampa dei tessuti utilizzati). Nei primi lavori su questo tema, ho usato il punto filza come decorazione e come strumento per “citare” i pattern dei quilt tradizionali. Nei lavori più recenti, l’opera è interamente ricoperta da questi fitti punti di cucitura, che creano non solo una trama, ma anche una campitura di colore. Anche se questo potrebbe essere fatto con una macchina da cucire, ritengo che la lavorazione manuale debba essere evidente. La qualità della cucitura fatta a mano è totalmente diversa da quella ottenuta con mezzi meccanici. L’investimento di tempo speso per cucire, a suo modo, rende anche omaggio alla storia insita nei tessuti di recupero che utilizzo e, in molti casi, alla persona alla quale sono originariamente appartenuti.

Continuo. 2021. larghezza 30 ¼ " altezza x 26" (frangia compresa). Seta vintage, ovatta di cotone, lana. Ruggine ed eco-tinta, cucito a mano con fili di seta e metallici. Ago da cucito. 2021. Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

Continuo – Parte II

Il 30 agosto 2021 sarebbe stato il nostro 19° anniversario, se mio marito fosse vissuto oltre i 42 anni. Quest’opera è stata iniziata nel 2005 (quando è stato scritto l’artist statement riportato qui sopra) e completata nell’agosto di quest’anno, dopo una pausa non solo da questo lavoro ma dall’attività artistica in generale. Ormai mi conosco abbastanza da sapere che una volta iniziata una cosa ho bisogno di completarla. Libri, film, relazioni. Anche se odio i personaggi, la scrittura o, nel caso di Dan, il finale. Continuo – il titolo si riferisce al continuo scambio di email che abbiamo mantenuto per tutto il nostro matrimonio. Si tratta del più grande lavoro di stoffa ricamata che abbia mai tentato di realizzare È stato il mio compagno costante: in parte coperta di sicurezza, in parte un’attività per tenere occupate le mani e la mente mentre ero seduta in un susseguirsi di stanze di ospedali e ospizi, prima con entrambi i genitori a Cleveland e poi a Pittsburgh con lui. A posteriori, per quanto amassi il pezzo, risultò troppo specifico. Senza intravederne la fine, ma non pronta a gettarlo via (una volta iniziato/deve essere finito), l’ho messo in un cassetto, con la stessa busta Ziploc, il filo e l’ago a metà del punto. Di tanto in tanto – per lo più in occasione di anniversari – lo tiravo fuori, mettendo alla prova la mia forza di volontà per tornare al lavoro. Cercavo di capire se questa volta mi avrebbe parlato in modo diverso. Quando non lo faceva, tornava nel cassetto. Negli anni successivi – a prescindere dal fatto che io fossi molto occupata, che la creatività si concentrasse sulla realizzazione di altre cose o che fossi vittima di quella che sembrava essere un interminabile crisi artistica, durata diversi anni – ha mantenuto il suo silenzio stampa. Fino a poco tempo fa. Le ultime settimane sono state una maratona: troppo poco sonno e mani incredibilmente doloranti, ma finalmente siamo arrivati ad una fine. Sono cambiate così tante cose nella vita da quando quest’opera è iniziata nel 2005, che anche il suo processo di completamento è stato diverso. Uso ancora il ricamo, è così familiare, ma ora ho allentato la tensione dei piccoli punti usati nella prima parte, che erano bellissimi ma insostenibili, avvicinandomi ai riff della musica jazz del sax di Dan. L’ago è ancora lì, a metà punto. La decisione di sistemare gli orli o lasciarli incompiuti, lasciare le cose in sospeso, è stata una scelta consapevole. Arte che imita la vita? Fatto. Un “lavoro in corso” chiuso. Fatto. Due? Forse.

Continuo-dettaglio 2021. Lunghezza 30 ¼ " x Altezza 26" (frangia compresa). Seta vintage, ovatta di cotone, lana. Ruggine e eco-tinta, cucito a mano con fili di seta e metallici. Ago da cucito. 2021. Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

Ci sono artisti contemporanei che ritieni vicini alla tua ricerca e al tuo linguaggio?

Tanti, ma per citarne alcuni: apprezzo il lavoro di Dorothy Caldwell e India Flint per la loro esplorazione di segni e colorazioni non tradizionali, Kusama per i suoi pattern ossessivi e la sua dedizione ad una modalità di lavoro mirata, El Anatsui per il suo riutilizzo creativo di materiali di scarto trasformati in oggetti di bellezza.

Untitled-Dettaglio 2020. 14" x 13.5". Tecnica mista: fazzoletto d'epoca, tessuto riciclato con stampa commerciale; serigrafia fotografica, acrilico, penna micron. Cucito a mano con filo di cotone e seta. Crediti fotografici: Camilla Brent Pearce

Com’è una giornata tipo nel tuo studio?

Non posso dire che esista una giornata “tipo” nel mio studio dal momento che concilio l’attività artistica con un lavoro a tempo pieno che non riguarda le arti visive (sono un fundraiser della Pittsburgh Symphony): creo arte ad intermittenza.   Sto uscendo da un lungo periodo di vuoto artistico. A parte un pezzo realizzato per una mostra che è stata esposta la settimana prima del COVID e che non ha mai avuto un pubblico dopo l’inaugurazione, Continuo è il primo pezzo che, dopo diversi anni, sono riuscita a realizzare.  Durante il covid ho cucito 30 capi d’abbigliamento (e sto ancora continuando), ho scattato fotografie da utilizzare come spunti creativi, ho curato un giardino perenne in continua evoluzione, ma non mi sono mai concentrata sulla creazione di oggetti o sul lavoro con le fibre.  Solitamente lavoro contemporaneamente a diversi pezzi. Passo il pomeriggio o un’intera giornata a mettere insieme i tessuti, a selezionarli, a stirarli, a stabilire gli strati e i modelli per la cucitura. Così il lavoro di pensiero è fatto in blocco e la cucitura vera e propria può avvenire a tempo debito.

Untitled-dettaglio, 2020. 14" x 13.5". Tecnica mista: fazzoletto d'epoca, tessuto riciclato con stampa commerciale; serigrafia fotografica, acrilico, penna micron. Cucito a mano con filo di cotone e seta. Crediti fotografici: Camilla Brent Pearce

Quanto è importante per un artista avere accesso a un evento prestigioso come Fiberart International?

Trovo che avere accesso a mostre come Fiberart International (sia come artista che come spettatore) sia molto importante.  In qualità di membro della Fiberarts Guild (e di volontaria a vario titolo per la mostra nel corso degli anni) è gratificante vedere l’entusiasmo con cui la mostra viene accolta e la qualità e la portata del lavoro realizzato a livello mondiale.  La mostra evidenzia la vitalità e l’innovazione in questo settore e propone artisti che si spingono oltre i confini tradizionali di ciò che è la fibra e di come viene utilizzata.

Y or Why or ?... BECAUSE- dettaglio. larghezza 2013. 11 ½ x altezza 11 7/8". Lino vintage tinto con il tè. Monogramma ricamato, cucito a mano con filo di seta. Disegno a penna Micron. Crediti fotografici: Polly Whitehorn, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce
Y or Why or ?... BECAUSE- dettaglio 2013. Larghezza 11 ½ l x Altezza 11 7/8". Lino vintage tinto con il tè. Monogramma ricamato, cucito a mano con filo di seta. Disegno a penna Micron. Crediti fotografici: Polly Whitehorn, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

Puoi parlarci di un lavoro o un progetto a cui sei particolarmente legata o che ha avuto un ruolo importante nel tuo sviluppo professionale?

È difficile sceglierne uno: ce ne sono molti per motivi diversi, ma credo che Continuo sia quello più importante per me. Ho scoperto che lavoro meglio quando c’è una combinazione di elementi formali e concettuali in un’opera, e come base emotiva un profondo legame personale con i materiali o la persona a cui sono appartenuti.  Nella maggior parte dei casi, se lo spettatore riesce ad essere coinvolto dall’opera, non è essenziale, per me, che sia informato sulla storia personale del proprietario precedente che si cela dietro i materiali. In alcuni rari casi ho realizzato una serie di lavori cuciti utilizzando il cotone dei boxer di mio marito (aveva una passione per le fantasie stravaganti e quando erano troppo usurati per essere indossati, finivano nella mia pila del riciclo).  La serie si intitolava Boxer Rebellion Series e necessitava di un po’ di retroscena. Con la realizzazione di Continuo, ho mostrato apertamente le mie emozioni più intime. Lavorare a quest’opera mi è stato utile come sollievo e come stimolo per avere una pratica artistica più regolare, sia durante il processo che al suo completamento.

Continuo-dettaglio 2021. Lunghezza 30 ¼" x altezza 26" (frangia compresa). Seta vintage, ovatta di cotone, lana. Ruggine e tintura ecologica, cucito a mano con fili di seta e metallici. Ago da cucito. 2021.Crediti fotografici: Alex Jones Photography, copyright Camilla Brent Pearce

A cosa stai lavorando al momento?

Al momento ho due pezzi cuciti in lavorazione dei quali uno molto grande (4 x 6′) che è ancora in fase di ideazione e progettazione, quindi il lavoro è piuttosto lento.  L’opera combina chiffon di seta tinti sia con ruggine che con caffè su un pannello di lino con un disegno floreale orientale recuperato dallo studio di design d’interni di mio nonno.  Ho riempito il disegno con punti di filza molto sottili e intendo usare fili metallici argentati sullo sfondo.  Mi piacciono i bordi fluidi dello chiffon in combinazione con le linee sinuose dei tralci di vite del disegno, quindi, oltre al lavoro di riempimento col punto, mi sto prendendo cura anche della presentazione e degli orli.   Sto anche pensando di aggiungere un disegno libero sopra tutti gli strati, ma non sono ancora pronta ad iniziare.

L’altro è un piccolo pezzo che combina organza di cotone serigrafata con un motivo di pizzo e lino.  Una volta cucita l’intera superficie, intendo tornarci sopra intervenendo col disegno.  Siccome sono nella fase di “riempimento”, la cucitura non è un problema ed è bello avere qualcosa di piccolo che posso mettere in un sacchetto e portare con me ovunque vada, al quale poter lavorare nei momenti liberi.

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.