Interview

CRYSTAL GREGORY

*Featured photo: Portrait Series, Together, handwoven cast into concrete 60in x 60in, 2019, copyright Crystal Gregory

The practice of Crystal Gregory, a textile sculptor born in 1983, is based on weaving. She explores the themes of weaving and the construction of space, relating weaving and architecture, focusing on the constructive value of textile architecture. Her works arise from the encounter between materials with different identities that the artist reinterprets, questioning their role and function.

Crystal Gregory graduated from the University of Oregon and received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago from the Fiber and Material Studies Department.

Her work has been shown in numerous solo and group exhibitions at museums and galleries, including the Rockwell Museum of Art, Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Projects, The Hunterdon Art Museum and Black and White Project Space.

Gregory is currently an Associate Professor at the School of Arts and Visual Studies at the University of Kentucky.

https://www.crystalgregory.org/

instagram @crystalirenegregory

Studio shot, photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

When did you decide to become an artist and why, among the many languages, did you adopt weaving as the basis of your work? What does this medium represent for you?

I approach my practice through my hands. I approach my practice through my body. Through making, touching, twisting, understanding materials, expanding my understanding of those materials – playing and sharing.

I approach my practice as a sculptor who considers each material as a tool for investigation into the human condition. I choose an art practice that incorporates long processes like weaving to give the time I feel is necessary to really know a material – hours in which my hands are moving and my mind has the space to develop my thinking. Building a weaving requires repetitive actions that develop and emerge out of one another. Each step is dependent on the one before and thoughtful of the step after.

A weaving is growing, developing, adding and changing. It is pliant and constantly in motion. I think about my weaving practice as a living research. It is both linear and cyclical in nature, requiring constant care and upkeep to advance forward.

I love the second part of this question ‘why, among the many languages, did you adopt weaving as the basis of your work’. Weaving is a language. It speaks through touch. It writes through lines of thread laid out one by one in a network of warp. Fabric is a material deeply embedded in the human experience. And because of that the material contains uncountable metaphors. It seems each year I am enamored with a different aspect of textiles. And keeps my attention as it is ever unfolding itself to me.

Shifting Center, handwoven cast into concrete, 6ft x 3ft, 2019. Photo cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory

What is the central theme you develop through your work?

Anni Albers explains, if architecture is fixed and permanent, then the opposite would be a textile—collapsible and movable. Any further consideration would show more common links than differences. Both mediums define space, create shelter, and allow privacy. A textile, however, has the advantage of flexibility. It is a semi two-dimensional plane that has the ability to fold, drape, move, and change to its surroundings. It is pliable.

My work uses cloth construction as a fundamental center, a place to start from and a place to move back to. With a background in weaving, I ultimately see myself as a builder. I draw a clear connection between the lines of thread laid perpendicularly through a warp and the construction of architectural spaces. The suppleness of a thread gives it the ability to adapt – to fold and meander or be put under tension and support weight. Thus, the argument for a “textile thought” is for that of structural suppleness, or a thought practice that allows the joining of paradox and intersections of varying parts. A woven structure is open enough to carry its complex history and simultaneously hold space for the newness of present contexts. The parameters of weaving and architecture – their process, their utility, their grid – are sturdy and stable and at the same time malleable and absorbent.

Articulations of Space, handwoven cast into concrete, 8ft x 6ft, 2019. Photo cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory
Embrace 2, handwoven cotton cast into concrete 45in x 34in x 2in, 2022. Photo Credit Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Embrace 2-detail, hand woven cotton cast into concrete 45in x 34in x 2in, 2022. Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

Many of your works are the result of the encounter and the conceptual but also concrete relationship between very different materials such as fabric and concret. Would you like to tell me about the role and significance of materials in your research and how you connect them through your work?

In my woven concrete series I embed woven huck lace into concrete. These works are material paintings, they hang on the wall and invite the viewer to experience them as an abstract painting of brightly colored lines and meandering grids. Yet they ask more of their viewing in their materiality, their utilitarian history, their surface and their texture. Materials and their cultural associations lie at the core of this work and as I work to unpack the meanings of lace and concrete, I incorporate the inherent contradictions of these materials into the conceptual strategy.

In contemporary culture concrete symbolizes strength, structure, and stability. Concrete, in many ways has been put in opposition to fabric. Its material make-up is understood as cold, hard and heavy. It is a compression material and exerts its strength by withstanding weight being piled onto it. And yet without reinforcement (often a mesh or woven structure) concrete is prone to crack and crumble, revealing its inability to adjust. Textiles, on the other hand, are soft and pliable. They also expend strength but through tensile properties; exerting flexibility and movement. Tensile strength is exerted by being pulled and stretched and able to withstand heavy loads. Through these physical characteristics we somehow have assigned hierarchies of strength often associating these materials with gender or sexuality. On closer look we are able to rearrange our understanding of strengths and weaknesses, ultimately seeing the value of each strength property as useful.

In this work I get to play with color and form and make in different modes. The weaving process is slow and meticulous, and I get to play with color and texture as the weaving grows. Once I reach the end of the warp I take the tension off and see the weaving for the first time. I work in arranging and composing a composition with this new raw material. Then finally I commit and cast the fabric permanently in concrete, This process is in contrast to the slowness and meticulousness of weaving. It is dusty and fast. I work the wet cement into the surface of the textile embedding the threads and permanently stilling their movement.

Describing Place 2, handwoven cast into concrete, 5ft x 3ft, 2019. Photo cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory
Describing Place 1, handwoven cast into concrete, 32in x 42in, 2019. Photo cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory
Describing Place 1-detail, handwoven cast into concrete, 32in x 42in, 2019. Photo cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory

The Event of the Thread is a performance installation in which you show the possible interactions between fabric, construction scaffolding and concrete, materials that are different in nature and function. Through the collaboration with the dance company The Moving Architects, a fourth element becomes part of this complex architecture: the human body. What is the thought process that guides the entire project and how did the idea of collaborating with a dance company come about?

The Event of a Thread, is a title used by many artists in recent years, most famously Ann Hamilton’s 2013 work at the Park Avenue Armory. This co-oping of title refers back to 1965 when Anni Albers described “the event of a thread” as something multilinear, without beginning or end: more broadly, it meant the constant possibility of reassessing relations and restructuring connections.

The title suggests movement, action and performance; something that is never still and is in constant state of becoming. As a thread is laid out in the warp it is put under tension and required a march of up or down movement. As a thread is laid in the weft it meanders under and over its counterpart warp threads until released from the tension of the loom and allowed to shape shift – to conform to each new circumstance or surrounding. Whether in the building of a weaving or the movement of a textile – The thread is never still.

In my installation the chosen materials are those of support and transition; industrial scaffolding textile and concrete pipe. In this installation these utilitarian materials are taken from their natural environment and are asked to exhibit systems of support for one another. I use the industrial materials to stretch and support the weaving creating a second loom within the gallery. In this work I am playing with double weave which is a process of weaving that allows the weaver to weave multiple layers on the same warp. The yardage I weave allows areas of cloth to be twice the width of the loom, create areas of intersection that can create pockets, or to weave two separate layers. With this weave structure the weaver can really play with textile as a three dimensional object.

Event of a Thread 4, industrial scaffolding, handwoven textile, concrete tube, 13 min dance performance in collaboration with The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Event of a Thread 1, industrial scaffolding, handwoven textile, concrete tube, 13 min dance performance in collaboration with The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Event of a Thread 2, industrial scaffolding, handwoven textile, concrete tube, 13 min dance performance in collaboration with The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright crystal Gregory
Event of a Thread 3, industrial scaffolding, handwoven textile, concrete tube, 13 min dance performance in collaboration with The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

With this work I have had the incredible opportunity to collaborate with the modern dance company, The Moving Architects. Working closely with director and choreographer, Erin Carlise Norton and two of her dancers we talked about movement in the studio, movement surrounding the utility of a textile, and the emotional gestures of this work. We workshoped and rehearsed for three days in my studio as well as in the installation created at the  21c Museum. The piece we formed incorporates phrases of actions and movements that describe strength and release – support and pliability – force and softness. What we made I am still understanding, since the space between these two media – dance and sculpture- is vast. For the first time I am thinking about time, narrative, character, telling a story that the sculpture implies.

Over the course of the exhibition I actively maintain the sculpture; shifting and changing the composition of the materials each week to mimic the postures and gestures uncovered by the dancers’ bodies. Each new composition expresses an effort towards finding new postures of balance and support. The work is an ever evolving performance. It doesn’t seek a finish but collects moments of stillness.

One of your most recent projects is an architectural scale permanent installation in a bank in San Antonio. Can you tell me about this project?

Weight in a Field of Color is a site specific project created for the stairwell of the Credit Human building, San Antonio. This work consists of seven 30 foot weavings installed from the 11th to the 5th floor. Each textile incorporates stainless steel ball chain into the brightly colored cotton warps, adding weight to the valley of each drape. The weight helped me to define the shape of each piece and I loved the utilitarian history of the metal ball chain being elevated to an elegant material, catching and reflecting light.

As the viewer circles around the staircase they experience the piece from many different angles flipping the role of architecture and textile. The textile becomes monumental – this project made me think about how a fabric is usually the smallest most intimate space that one person can carry. Expanding that idea outward it was easy to see the correlation between the spaces between the clothing and the skin and the space between the clothing and the ceiling as comparable. They are both spaces that envelop the body. Both materials have an effect on the individual and ultimately condition a person. In other words you can both shape and be shaped by your surroundings.

How do the environment, the everyday places, your artistic community of reference, influence your work?

I find the field of Fiber to be filled with really generous people. I have had so many experiences across the country and internationally with artists and makers working in textiles wanting to share their passion and support for one another. This spirit has influenced my work greatly. I see my work as both incredibly personal and yet universal in that we all share a knowledge of a fabrics use and touch. I currently hold a position as Associate Professor in the School of Art and Visual Studies at the University of Kentucky. Through my teaching I get to continue this lineage and share my passion and knowledge and help push artists in this field.

Hold Tight Swing Low 1, hand woven cotton cast into concrete 54in x 54in x 2in, 2022 Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Hold Tight Swing Low 1-detail, hand woven cotton cast into concrete 54in x 54in x 2in, 2022 Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

 

What are you working on at the moment?

I am so excited by the three projects currently underway in the studio. The first project is in collaboration with artist Alexa Williams and will be exhibited in downtown Brooklyn NYC in September of 2022. The second is a new work in collaboration with The Moving Architects. We will be creating a second iteration of the installation and dance work The Event of the Thread. I will build out a woven installation and with the dance company workshop movement this wintre in hopes to exhibit in Europe the following year. Lastly, my digital weaving investigations are ongoing but exhibited in an upcoming exhibition with Tappan Collective Los Angeles.

Bodies at Rest in collaboration with Alexa Williams

A weaving employs a system of intersections creating a gridded network using two divergent parts: the warp and the weft. For our exhibition, Bodies at Rest, we will use the columns of 15 Metro Tech, downtown Brooklyn, as a loom. Blue cargo straps and brightly colored mason’s line stacking 12 feet high and suspended 35 feet wide create a horizontal “warp” within the lobby. Woven within the brightly colored “warp” will be tall brass sheets, bold and reflective. The brass will balance utilizing the gridded network to support their weight.

In this work we use materials associated with construction, hauling and architecture, to radically reevaluate gendered perceptions of intimacy, vulnerability, and strength. The materials within this sculpture become avatars of our bodies and create an evidence of the physical, mental, and emotional effort that is required to make our sculptures collaboratively. These are our feminist gestures supporting growth and potentiality, allowing each posture to teach and to be remembered.

Shapes of Movement In collaboration with The Moving Architects

In this new project the parameters of woven textiles and architecture are explored as they pertain to movement— movement described by and remembered through the outlining material landscape. The movement through a landscape, the pliability of a textile, as well as their gridded systems, are described and explored in relation to social structures of citizenship and intersecting parts of a whole. Ultimately, recognition of these systems as boundaries and edges describes the life within.

For this work, a woven installation intersects the architecture with permeable and transferable walls. The dancers will change the shape of the space through movement of the fabric to create new compositions over the arch of the performance.

Digital Weaving

The University of Kentucky recently acquired a new loom called the TC2. This loom allows me to design the intersection of each warp and weft individually – opening up enormous possibilities of interlacement. This summer I am working on the TC2 to produce a new series of wall works that investigate complex weave structures and shape through double weave.

Hold Tight Swing Low 2, hand woven cotton cast into concrete 67in x 60in x 2in, 2022 Photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Hold Tight Swing Low 2-detail, hand woven cotton cast into concrete 67in x 60in x 2in, 2022 Photo Credit Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Interviste

CRYSTAL GREGORY

*Foto in evidenza: Portrait Series, Together, tessuto realizzato a mano su cemento 60in x 60in, 2019, copyright Crystal Gregory

La pratica di Crystal Gregory, scultrice tessile, classe 1983, si fonda sulla tessitura ed esplora i temi dell’intreccio e della costruzione dello spazio, mettendo in relazione tessitura e architettura, con particolare attenzione al valore costruttivo dell’architettura tessile. Le sue opere nascono dall’incontro tra materiali con identità diverse che l’artista reinterpreta mettendone in discussione ruolo e funzione.

Crystal Gregory si è laureata presso l’Università dell’Oregon e ha ricevuto il suo MFA alla School of the Art Institute of Chicago dal Dipartimento di studi su fibre e materiali (School of the Art Institute of Chicago from the Fiber and Material Studies Department).
Il suo lavoro è stato esposto in numerose mostre personali e collettive presso musei e gallerie tra cui il Rockwell Museum of Art, la Dorsky Gallery Curatorial Projects, The Hunterdon Art Museum e il Black and White Project Space.

Attualmente la Gregory è Associate Professor presso la School of Arts and Visual Studies dell’Università del Kentucky.

https://www.crystalgregory.org/
instagram @crystalirenegregory

Studio shot, photo cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

Quando hai deciso di diventare un’artista e perché, tra molteplici linguaggi, adotti la tessitura come base del tuo lavoro? Cosa rappresenta per te questo medium?

Il mio approccio alla pratica artistica avviene attraverso le mie mani. Mi avvicino ad essa attraverso il mio corpo. Attraverso il fare, il toccare, il torcere, il capire i materiali, l’espandere la mia comprensione degli stessi – giocando e condividendo.

Mi approccio alla pratica come uno scultore che considera ogni materiale come uno strumento di indagine sulla condizione umana. Ho scelto una pratica artistica che incorpora processi lunghi come la tessitura per concedermi il tempo che ritengo necessario per arrivare a conoscere davvero un materiale – ore in cui le mie mani si muovono e la mia mente ha lo spazio per sviluppare il mio pensiero. La costruzione di una tessitura richiede azioni ripetitive che si sviluppano ed emergono l’una dall’altra. Ogni passo dipende da quello precedente ed è consapevole di quello successivo.

Una tessitura cresce, si sviluppa, si arricchisce e cambia. È flessibile e in costante movimento. Penso alla mia pratica di tessitura come a una ricerca vivente di natura lineare e ciclica, che richiede cura e manutenzione costanti per progredire.

Mi piace molto la seconda parte della domanda: “Perché, tra i tanti linguaggi, ha adottato la tessitura come base del suo lavoro?”. La tessitura è un linguaggio. Parla attraverso il tatto. Scrive attraverso linee di filo disposte una ad una in una rete di ordito. Il tessuto è un materiale profondamente radicato nell’esperienza umana. E per questo contiene innumerevoli metafore. Sembra che di anno in anno mi innamori di un aspetto diverso del tessile. Il tessuto è un materiale che si rivela continuamente e che mantiene sempre alto il livello della mia attenzione.

Shifting Center, tessuto realizzato a mano su cemento, 6ft x 3ft, 2019. Foto cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory

Qual è il tema centrale che sviluppi attraverso il tuo lavoro?

Anni Albers spiega che se l’architettura è stabile e permanente, il suo opposto è invece il tessuto, pieghevole e mobile. Ogni ulteriore considerazione mostrerebbe più similitudini che differenze. Entrambi i mezzi definiscono lo spazio, procurano riparo e garantiscono la privacy. Il tessuto, tuttavia, ha il vantaggio della flessibilità. È un piano semi-dimensionale che ha la capacità di piegarsi, drappeggiarsi, muoversi e adattarsi all’ambiente circostante. È malleabile.

Il mio lavoro utilizza la costruzione del tessuto come centro fondamentale, un punto di partenza e un punto di ritorno. Con una formazione in tessitura, mi vedo, in ultima analisi, come un costruttore. Traggo un collegamento evidente tra le linee di filo posate perpendicolarmente nell’ordito e la costruzione di spazi architettonici. La duttilità di un filo gli conferisce la capacità di adattarsi, di piegarsi e serpeggiare o di essere messo in tensione e sostenere un peso. L’argomentazione a favore di un “pensiero tessile” è quindi quella di una flessibilità strutturale, o di una pratica di pensiero che permetta l’unione di paradossi e intersezioni di parti diverse. Una struttura tessuta è sufficientemente aperta per portare con sé la sua storia complessa e contemporaneamente mantenere uno spazio per la novità dei contesti attuali. I parametri della tessitura e dell’architettura – il loro processo, la loro utilità, la loro griglia – sono robusti e stabili e allo stesso tempo malleabili e assorbenti.

Articulations of Space, tessuto realizzato a mano su cemento, 8ft x 6ft, 2019. Foto cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory
Embrace 2, Cotone tessuto a mano su cemento, 45in x 34in x 2in, 2022. Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Embrace 2-detail, Cotone tessuto a mano su cemento, 45in x 34in x 2in, 2022. Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

Molte delle tue opere nascono dall’incontro e dalla relazione, concettuale ma anche concreta, che si stabilisce tra materiali molto diversi come ad esempio il tessuto e il cemento. Vorresti parlarmi del ruolo e del significato che i materiali rivestono nella tua ricerca e del modo in cui li metti in connessione attraverso il tuo lavoro?

Nella mia serie di opere tessute ho incorporato in supporti di cemento dei pizzi huck. Queste opere, dei dipinti materici esposti a parete, invitano lo spettatore a viverle come un quadro astratto di linee colorate e griglie serpeggianti. Eppure la loro materialità, la loro storia di utilità, la loro superficie e la loro consistenza richiedono maggiori attenzioni da parte dell’osservatore. I materiali e le loro associazioni culturali sono al centro di questo lavoro e, mentre cerco di analizzare i significati propri del pizzo e del cemento, incorporo le contraddizioni intrinseche di questi materiali nella strategia concettuale.

Nella cultura contemporanea il cemento simboleggia forza, struttura e stabilità. Il cemento, per molti versi, è stato contrapposto al tessuto. La sua composizione materiale è intesa come fredda, dura e pesante. È un materiale a compressione ed esercita la sua forza sopportando il peso che vi si accumula. Eppure, senza armatura (spesso una rete o una struttura intrecciata) il calcestruzzo è incline a creparsi e a sgretolarsi, rivelando la sua incapacità di adattarsi. I tessuti, invece, sono morbidi e malleabili. Anch’essi hanno forza, ma attraverso le proprietà di trazione; esercitano invece flessibilità e movimento. La resistenza alla trazione si esercita tirando e allungando i tessuti, che sono in grado di sopportare carichi pesanti. Attraverso queste caratteristiche fisiche abbiamo in qualche modo assegnato gerarchie di forza, spesso associando questi materiali al genere o alla sessualità. Ad uno sguardo più attento siamo in grado di riorganizzare la nostra comprensione di questi punti di forza e debolezza, riconoscendo il valore di ciascuna proprietà come utile.

In questo lavoro posso giocare con il colore e la forma e creare in modi diversi. Il processo di tessitura è lento e meticoloso e mi permette di giocare con il colore e la trama man mano che la tessitura cresce. Una volta raggiunta la fine dell’ordito, tolgo la tensione e vedo la tessitura per la prima volta. Successivamente, lavoro alla disposizione e alla composizione di questa nuova materia prima. Questo processo è in contrasto con la lentezza e la meticolosità della tessitura. È polveroso e veloce. Lavoro il cemento umido sulla superficie del tessuto, incorporando i fili e bloccandone definitivamente il movimento.

Describing Place 2, tessuto a mano su cemento, 5ft x 3ft, 2019. Foto cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory
Describing Place 1, tessuto a mano su cemento, 32in x 42in, 2019. Foto cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory
Describing Place 1-detail, tessuto a mano su cemento, 32in x 42in, 2019. Foto cr. Amber Gregory, copyright Crystal Gregory

The Event of the Thread è una installazione performativa in cui mostri le possibili interazioni tra tessuto, impalcature da costruzione e cemento, materiali diversi per natura e funzione. Attraverso la collaborazione con la compagnia di danza The Moving Architects, entra poi a far parte di questa complessa architettura anche un quarto elemento: il corpo umano. Quale è la riflessione che guida l’intero progetto e come è nata l’idea di inserire la collaborazione con un corpo di ballo?

The Event of a Thread (L’evento di un filo) è un titolo utilizzato da molti artisti negli ultimi anni, tra cui spicca l’opera di Ann Hamilton del 2013 al Park Avenue Armory. Questa scelta di titoli si rifà al 1965, quando Anni Albers descrisse “l’evento di un filo” come qualcosa di multilineare, senza inizio né fine: più in generale, significava la possibilità costante di rivalutare le relazioni e ristrutturare le connessioni.

Il titolo suggerisce movimento, azione e performance; qualcosa che non è mai fermo ed è in costante divenire. Quando un filo è disposto nell’ordito, viene messo in tensione e sottoposto a una marcia di movimento verso l’alto o verso il basso. Quando un filo viene steso nella trama, serpeggia sotto e sopra i suoi fili d’ordito fino a quando non viene liberato dalla tensione del telaio e gli viene permesso di cambiare forma, di conformarsi a ogni nuova circostanza o ambiente. Sia nella costruzione di una tessitura che nel movimento di un tessuto, il filo non è mai fermo.

Nella mia installazione i materiali scelti sono quelli di supporto e transizione: impalcature industriali, tessuti e tubi di cemento. In questa installazione questi materiali di uso comune sono presi dal loro ambiente naturale e sono chiamati a mettere in scena sistemi di sostegno reciproco. Uso i materiali industriali per allungare e sostenere la tessitura creando un secondo telaio all’interno della galleria. In questo lavoro gioco con la doppia trama, che è un processo di tessitura che permette al tessitore di tessere più strati sullo stesso ordito. L’ampiezza della tessitura permette di avere aree di tessuto di larghezza doppia rispetto al telaio, di creare aree di intersezione e tasche o di tessere due strati separati. Con questa struttura di tessitura il tessitore può davvero giocare con il tessuto come oggetto tridimensionale.

Event of a Thread 4, impalcatura industriale, tessuto a mano, tubo di cemento, performance di danza di 13 minuti in collaborazione con The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Event of a Thread 1, impalcatura industriale, tessuto a mano, tubo di cemento, performance di danza di 13 minuti in collaborazione con The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Event of a Thread 2, impalcatura industriale, tessuto a mano, tubo di cemento, performance di danza di 13 minuti in collaborazione con The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Event of a Thread 3, impalcatura industriale, tessuto a mano, tubo di cemento, performance di danza di 13 minuti in collaborazione con The Moving Architects 21C Museum Lexington, 2020. Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

Per questo lavoro ho avuto l’incredibile opportunità di collaborare con la compagnia di danza moderna The Moving Architects. Lavorando a stretto contatto con la regista e coreografa Erin Carlise Norton e due dei suoi ballerini. Abbiamo parlato del movimento nello studio, del movimento intorno alla funzione di un tessuto e dei gesti emotivi di questo lavoro. Abbiamo lavorato e provato per tre giorni nel mio studio e nell’installazione creata al Museo 21c. Il pezzo che abbiamo creato incorpora frasi di azioni e movimenti che descrivono la forza e il rilascio – il sostegno e la duttilità – la forza e la morbidezza. Quello che abbiamo fatto lo sto ancora capendo, perché lo spazio tra questi due media – danza e scultura – è vasto. Per la prima volta sto pensando al tempo, alla narrazione, al personaggio, al racconto di una storia implicito nella scultura.

Nel corso della mostra ho attivamente modificato la scultura, spostando e cambiando la composizione dei materiali ogni settimana per imitare le posture e i gesti svelati dai corpi dei danzatori. Ogni nuova composizione esprime il tentativo di trovare nuove posture di equilibrio e di sostegno. Il lavoro è una performance in continua evoluzione. Non è teso alla ricerca di un traguardo, ma raccoglie momenti di immobilità.

Tra i tuoi progetti più recenti troviamo l’installazione permanente che hai realizzato presso la Banca di San Antonio? Mi puoi parlare di questo progetto e di come è nato?

Weight in a Field of Color è un progetto creato per il vano scale dell’edificio Credit Human, a San Antonio. L’opera consiste in sette tessiture di 30 piedi installate dall’11° al 5° piano. Ogni tessuto incorpora negli orditi di cotone dai colori vivaci delle catenelle di acciaio a palline, aggiungendo peso agli avvallamenti di ogni drappo. Il peso mi ha aiutato a definire la forma di ogni pezzo e mi è piaciuto trasformare la storia della funzione comune di questa catena metallica elevandola a materiale elegante, che cattura e riflette la luce.

Mentre lo spettatore percorre la scala, percepisce l’opera da diverse angolazioni, capovolgendo il ruolo dell’architettura e del tessuto. Il tessuto diventa monumentale – questo progetto mi ha fatto pensare a come un tessuto sia solitamente considerato come lo spazio più piccolo e intimo che una persona possa portare con sé. Espandendo questa idea verso l’esterno, è stato facile comprendere la correlazione tra gli spazi che intercorrono tra gli abiti e la pelle e lo spazio tra gli abiti e il soffitto. Sono entrambi spazi che avvolgono il corpo. Entrambi i materiali hanno un effetto sull’individuo e, in ultima analisi, condizionano la persona. In altre parole, gli ambienti che ci circondano possono sia plasmare che essere plasmati

In che modo l’ambiente, i luoghi della quotidianità, la tua comunità artistica di riferimento, influenzano il tuo lavoro?

Trovo che il mondo della fibra sia pieno di persone davvero generose. Ho avuto tante esperienze in tutto il Paese e a livello internazionale con artisti e creatori che lavorano nel settore tessile e che sono disposti a condividere la loro passione sostenendosi rispettivamente. Questo spirito ha influenzato molto il mio lavoro. Vedo il mio lavoro come incredibilmente personale e allo stesso tempo universale, in quanto tutti condividiamo la conoscenza dell’uso e del tatto dei tessuti. Attualmente ricopro il ruolo di professore associato presso la Scuola di Arte e Studi Visivi dell’Università del Kentucky. Attraverso l’insegnamento ho la possibilità di proseguire in questo filone e di condividere la mia passione e le mie conoscenze aiutando altri artisti.

Hold Tight Swing Low 1, cotone tessuto a mano su cemento 54in x 54in x 2in, 2022 Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Hold Tight Swing Low 1-dettaglio, cotone tessuto a mano su cemento, 54 in x 54 in x 2 in, 2022 Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

A cosa stai lavorando in questo momento?

Sono molto entusiasta dei tre progetti che sto attualmente sviluppando nel mio studio. Il primo progetto è una collaborazione con l’artista Alexa Williams e sarà esposto nel centro di Brooklyn a settembre del 2022. Il secondo è un nuovo lavoro in collaborazione con The Moving Architects. Creeremo una seconda iterazione dell’installazione e dell’opera di danza The Event of the Thread. Presenterò un’installazione e un laboratorio di movimento con la compagnia di danza questo inverno, nella speranza di esporre in Europa l’anno successivo. Infine, sono in corso le mie ricerche sulla tessitura digitale che saranno esposte in una prossima mostra con il Tappan Collective di Los Angeles.

Bodies at Rest in collaborazione con Alexa Williams

Una tessitura impiega un sistema di intersezioni che crea una struttura reticolare utilizzando due parti divergenti: l’ordito e la trama. Per la nostra mostra, Bodies at Rest, utilizzeremo come telaio le colonne del 15 Metro Tech, nel centro di Brooklyn. Cinghie da carico blu e corde dai colori vivaci disposte a 12 piedi di altezza e sospese a 35 piedi di larghezza creano un “ordito” orizzontale all’interno dell’atrio. Nel vivace ordito colorato sarà inserita una trama di lastre di ottone, audaci e riflettenti. Gli ottoni saranno in equilibrio grazie alla rete che ne sosterrà il peso.

In questo lavoro utilizziamo materiali associati alla costruzione, al trasporto e all’architettura, per rivalutare radicalmente le percezioni di genere dell’intimità, della vulnerabilità e della forza. I materiali all’interno di questa scultura diventano avatar dei nostri corpi e creano una testimonianza dello sforzo fisico, mentale ed emotivo che è necessario per realizzare le nostre sculture in collaborazione. Questi sono i gesti femministi che sostengono la crescita e danno possibilità, permettendo a ogni postura di fungere da insegnamento e di essere ricordata.

Shapes of Movement In collaborazione con The Moving Architects

In questo nuovo progetto vengono esplorati i parametri dei tessuti e dell’architettura in relazione al movimento – movimento descritto e ricordato attraverso il paesaggio materiale che lo delinea. Il movimento attraverso un paesaggio, la duttilità di un tessuto e i suoi sistemi reticolari sono descritti ed esplorati in relazione alle strutture sociali della cittadinanza e alle parti intersecanti di un insieme. In definitiva, il riconoscimento di questi sistemi come confini e bordi descrive la vita al loro interno.

Per questo lavoro, un’installazione intrecciata interseca l’architettura con pareti permeabili e trasferibili. I danzatori cambieranno la forma dello spazio attraverso il movimento del tessuto per creare nuove composizioni durante l’arco della performance.

Digital weaving

L’Università del Kentucky ha recentemente acquistato un nuovo telaio, il TC2. Questo telaio mi permette di progettare l’intersezione di ogni ordito e trama individualmente, aprendo enormi possibilità all’intreccio. Sto lavorando sul TC2 per produrre una nuova serie di opere murali che indagano su strutture di trama e forme complesse attraverso la doppia tessitura.

Hold Tight Swing Low 2, cotone tessuto a mano su cemento, 2022 Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory
Hold Tight Swing Low 2-dettaglio, cotone tessuto a mano su cemento 67in x 60in x 2in, 2022 Foto cr. Rob Southard, copyright Crystal Gregory

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.