Interview

DEBBIE OSHRAT

*Featured photos: “Ophelia” Collage, Mixed, 107cm × 107cm, 2020. Photo credit Adi Cohen

Debbie Oshrat (Haifa,1954) lives and works in Ramat Hasharon, Israel. She studied Interior Design and Furniture at NB Haifa School of Design. After a long career in this area, while deepening her knowledge in spiritual subjects such as Reiki or Native American philosophy, she embarked on a new journey by dedicating herself to art. She has chosen to use tea bags to narrate stories combining different techniques, including embroidery and painting, in recent years. Through a language that draws on ancient archetypes and codes, Oshrat gives voice to outdated, obsolete, old and discarded elements, transforming them into a medium for storytelling with and about contemporaneity.

Two of Debbie Oshrat’s works are in the collection of the Yad Vashem Museum. In addition, her works have been shown in galleries and institutional venues in numerous exhibitions in Israel.

“Kiss of the Spider Women” Collage, Mixed, 80 cm × 107cm, 2020. Photo credit Adi Cohen

When did you realize that art was your path?

I studied Interior Design and Furniture and worked in that area many years. About 10 years ago I decided to dedicate myself to painting. I knew it was either now or never . . .

From “Shadows” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Adi Cohen
From “Shadows” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Yuval Hai

Used tea bags are the basic material of your works. Why this choice?

As a daughter to Holocaust survivors, my work with tea bags started from the number tattooed on my mother’s hand, being an Auschwitz survivor. The look of her aging arm skin triggered me on a quest for a platform with texture and coloring to be as close as possible to the look of her aging skin, so I found used tea bags to be the closest resemblance. Also, it enabled me to touch and to unravel the “Conspiracy of Silence” prevailed amongst Holocaust survivors.

From “Written on the Skin” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Yuval Hai
From “Written on the Skin” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Adi Cohen

Your works are the result of a patient work of dismantling, reassembly, sewing. Is there an ancestral memory in this process, a sort of feminine ritual that has its roots in the mists of time and is transformed here into an artistic gesture, in contemporary language? Is using sewing to create works of art also an assertive choice that emancipates this practice from the traditional classifications of domestic female activity, mostly hobby or craft?

Patience in sewing, like most women’s crafts is a feminine feature. For generations, women were the ones who did the weaving, embroidery and sewing, but still routine feminine work was an underestimated activity in patriarchal cultures.

In my works I revive old materials, correspond with ancient world of crafts using the language of “The Wild Woman” converting them into the contemporary world – actual, living and kicking.

From “Noga in my Heart” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2019. Photo credit Adi Cohen
From “Noga in my Heart” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2019. Photo credit Adi Cohen
From “Noga in my Heart” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2019. Photo credit Adi Cohen

What is ‘memory’ and how and how much is it inspiration for your artistic investigation and practice?

“Memory” is the ability of an organism to store information from the environment through its various senses. The word “memory” refers to both the ability to store information and to the information stored itself.

Almost every work of art is associated with a type of memory, pure memories from past and present experiences, or memories and images from previous incarnations.

Used tea bags reflect from one hand the conversation with the people who used them, and from the other hand the softness, warmth and the tender layers, that simulate a maternal blanket that protects, hugs and comforts from vulnerability. . .

From “Your Mother’s Cunt” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2021. Photo credit Own
From “Your Mother’s Cunt” Series, Mixed, 20cm × 20cm, 2021. Photo credit Own

Is art more catharsis or more cure, or what else, in your opinion?

Art and creation for me are both Catharsis and Healing. Sewing and embroidery as a mending process of the mind is a fundamental principle in my works. The mending does not hide the injuries of the soul but contains them, respects them and patches them as much as possible.

Sewing used tea bags to each other is a ritual. This ritual is an anti-phobic and anti-anxious act, that helps to deal with difficulties and also heals. The ritual of sewing is a correcting and connecting acts to what is meant to fall apart and crumble.

From “Reborn” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2021. Photo credit Own
From “Reborn” Series, Mixed, 20cm × 20cm, 2021. Photo credit Own

Your works deal with many female themes with great sensitivity. Some – I think for example the body of works NOGA INTO THE HEART – investigate and deal with very intimate and personal themes. How much autobiographical is your work? How much do art and life coincide for you?

My observation of the inner and outer world is through eyes and feminine energies. This is how I implement it in my works, using feminine techniques . . . traditional techniques of past years . . . the essence of wild and real woman. I work hard on contrasts and opposites, dealing with difficult and painful personal issues, turning them into an aesthetic, feminine, delicate and beautiful work. I expose very intimate work bodies and make them collective, for public domain.

From “In a Red Dress” Series, Mixed, 15cm × 21cm, 2021. Photo credit Own
From “In a Red Dress” Series, Mixed, 31cm × 43cm, 2021. Photo credit Own

How are your works born and developed?

I am highly connected to the spiritual world, usually my ideas come through dreaming and meditation.

Is there a work that is so deeply part of you that you don’t want to part with it?

At the beginning of my artistic path, I kept my work as a secret belonging only to me. I went through a slow process of sharing my work with my closest environment, then I developed into spreading it into a wider environment, later to open up to whole world in the form of exhibitions. Very slowly and with many difficulties I also agreed to sell some of my works.

Works I did not agree to sell, which I donated to the “Yad Vashem” (A Holocaust remembrance Museum in Jerusalem), are works which contain the tattooed number from my mother’s hand.

What are you working on right now?

I am currently in the process of consolidating my next topic, exploring a number of options.

From “Flowing Arteries” Series, 26cm × 35cm, 2022. Photo credit Own
From “Flowing Arteries” Series, 26cm × 35cm, 2022. Photo credit Own
Interviste

DEBBIE OSHRAT

*Foto in evidenza: “Ophelia” Collage, Mixed, 107cm × 107cm, 2020. Photo credit Adi Cohen
Traduzione a cura di Elena Redaelli

Debbie Oshrat (Haifa,1954) vive e lavora a Ramat Hasharon in Israele. Ha studiato Interior Design e Arredamento presso la NB Haifa School of Design e dopo una lunga carriera in questo ambito, mentre approfondiva la sua conoscenza in materie spirituali come il Reiki o la filosofia dei nativi americani, ha intrapreso un nuovo percorso dedicandosi all’arte. Negli ultimi anni, ha scelto le bustine da tè usate per raccontare storie, combinando diverse tecniche tra cui il ricamo e la pittura. Attraverso un linguaggio che attinge ad archetipi e codici arcaici, Oshrat dà voce ad elementi superati, desueti, vecchi, scartati trasformandoli in un medium di narrazione con e della contemporaneità.

Due opere di Debbie Oshrat sono nella collezione del Museo Yad Vashem. I suoi lavori sono stati esposti in gallerie e sedi istituzionali in numerose mostre in Israele.

“Kiss of the Spider Women” Collage, Mixed, 80 cm × 107cm, 2020. Photo credit Adi Cohen

Quando hai capito che l’arte era il tuo percorso?

Ho studiato Interior Design e Arredamento e ho lavorato in quel settore per molti anni. Circa 10 anni fa ho deciso di dedicarmi alla pittura. Sapevo che sarebbe stato ora o mai più…

From “Shadows” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Adi Cohen
From “Shadows” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Yuval Hai

Le bustine usate del te sono il materiale base dei tuoi lavori. Perché questa scelta?

Come figlia di sopravvissuti all’Olocausto, il mio lavoro con le bustine di tè è nato dal numero tatuato sulla mano di mia madre, sopravvissuta ad Auschwitz. L’aspetto della pelle del suo braccio invecchiato mi ha spinto a cercare una superficie con una consistenza e un colore che si avvicinasse il più possibile a quello della sua pelle invecchiata, così ho trovato nelle bustine di tè usate la somiglianza più vicina. Inoltre, questo processo mi permesso di approcciare e rivelare la “Congiura del Silenzio”, prevalente tra i sopravvissuti all’Olocausto.

From “Written on the Skin” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Yuval Hai
From “Written on the Skin” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2017. Photo credit Adi Cohen

Le tue opere sono il risultato di un paziente lavoro di smantellamento, riassemblamento, cucitura. C’è in questo processo una memoria ancestrale, una sorta di ritualità femminile che affonda le radici nella notte dei tempi e che qui si trasforma in gesto artistico, in linguaggio contemporaneo? Utilizzare il cucito per realizzare opere d’arte è anche una scelta assertiva che emancipa questa pratica dalle tradizionali classificazioni di attività femminile domestica?

La pazienza richiesta dall’atto del cucire, come la maggior parte dei mestieri femminili, è una caratteristica della donna. Per generazioni, le donne erano quelle che si occupavano della tessitura, del ricamo e del cucito, ma il lavoro femminile quotidiano è sempre stato sottovalutato nelle culture patriarcali. Nelle mie opere faccio rivivere vecchi materiali, comunico col mondo dei mestieri antichi usando il linguaggio della “Donna Selvaggia” e convertendoli, così, nel mondo contemporaneo – attuale, vivo e pulsante.

From “Noga in my Heart” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2019. Photo credit Adi Cohen
From “Noga in my Heart” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2019. Photo credit Adi Cohen
From “Noga in my Heart” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2019. Photo credit Adi Cohen

Cos’è la memoria e quanto la tua ricerca artistica è ispirata dalla necessità di rielaborarla per consegnarla al futuro?

La “memoria” è la capacità di un organismo di conservare le informazioni provenienti dall’ambiente esterno e percepite attraverso i sensi. La parola “memoria” si riferisce sia alla capacità di immagazzinare informazioni che alle informazioni stesse. Quasi ogni opera d’arte è associata a un tipo di memoria: ricordi puri di esperienze passate e presenti o ricordi e immagini di precedenti incarnazioni.

Le bustine di tè usate riflettono, da una parte, la comunicazione con le persone che le hanno usate, e dall’altra la morbidezza, il calore e i morbidi strati, che simulano una coperta materna che protegge, abbraccia e conforta dalla vulnerabilità. . .

From “Your Mother’s Cunt” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2021. Photo credit Own
From “Your Mother’s Cunt” Series, Mixed, 20cm × 20cm, 2021. Photo credit Own

L’arte è più catarsi o più cura, o cos’altro, secondo te?

L’arte e la creazione per me sono sia catarsi che guarigione. Un principio fondamentale nelle mie opere è l’uso del cucito e del ricamo come processo di cura del pensiero. Il rammendo non nasconde le ferite dell’anima ma le contiene, le rispetta e le ripara il più possibile.

Cucire le bustine di tè usate l’una all’altra è un rituale. Questo rituale è un atto anti-fobico e anti-ansioso, che aiuta ad affrontare le difficoltà e anche a guarire. Il rituale del cucito è un atto correttivo e di connessione a ciò che è destinato a cadere a pezzi e a sgretolarsi.

From “Reborn” Series, Mixed, 26cm × 35cm, 2021. Photo credit Own
From “Reborn” Series, Mixed, 20cm × 20cm, 2021. Photo credit Own

Le tue opere affrontano con grande sensibilità molte tematiche femminili. Alcune – penso ad esempio il corpo di lavori NOGA INTO THE HEART – indagano e affrontano temi molto intimi e personali. Quanto è autobiografico il tuo lavoro? Quanto coincidono per te l’arte e la vita?

La mia osservazione del mondo interno ed esterno avviene attraverso lo sguardo e le energie femminili. Questo è il modo in cui lo attualizzo nelle mie opere, utilizzando tecniche femminili. . . tecniche tradizionali del passato . . . l’essenza della donna selvaggia e reale. Lavoro molto sui contrasti e gli opposti, affrontando questioni personali difficili e dolorose, trasformandole in un lavoro estetico, femminile, delicato e bello. Espongo lavori molto intimi e li rendo collettivi, di dominio pubblico.

From “In a Red Dress” Series, Mixed, 15cm × 21cm, 2021. Photo credit Own
From “In a Red Dress” Series, Mixed, 31cm × 43cm, 2021. Photo credit Own

Come nascono e si sviluppano le tue opere?

Sono molto legata al mondo spirituale, di solito le mie idee emergono attraverso il sogno e la meditazione.

C’è un’opera che è così profondamente parte di te da non volertene separare?

All’inizio del mio percorso artistico, custodivo il mio lavoro come un segreto che apparteneva solo a me. Sono passata attraverso un lento processo di condivisione del mio lavoro prima con le persone a me più vicine, poi mi sono allargata fino a diffonderlo in un ambiente più ampio, per poi aprirmi al mondo intero attraverso le mostre. Molto lentamente, e con molte difficoltà, ho anche accettato di vendere alcune delle mie opere.

Le opere che non ho accettato di vendere, che ho donato allo “Yad Vashem” (un museo della memoria dell’Olocausto a Gerusalemme), sono quelle che contengo il numero tatuato della mano di mia madre.

A cosa stai lavorando in questo momento?

Attualmente sono in procinto di consolidare il mio prossimo argomento d’indagine e sto esplorando una serie di opzioni.

From “Flowing Arteries” Series, 26cm × 35cm, 2022. Photo credit Own
From “Flowing Arteries” Series, 26cm × 35cm, 2022. Photo credit Own

Barbara Pavan

English version Sono nata a Monza nel 1969 ma cresciuta in provincia di Biella, terra di filati e tessuti. Mi sono occupata lungamente di arte contemporanea, dopo aver trasformato una passione in una professione. Ho curato mostre, progetti espositivi, manifestazioni culturali, cataloghi e blog tematici, collaborando con associazioni, gallerie, istituzioni pubbliche e private. Da qualche anno la mia attenzione è rivolta prevalentemente verso l’arte tessile e la fiber art, linguaggi contemporanei che assecondano un antico e mai sopito interesse per i tappeti ed i tessuti antichi. Su ARTEMORBIDA voglio raccontare la fiber art italiana, con interviste alle artiste ed agli artisti e recensioni degli eventi e delle mostre legate all’arte tessile sul territorio nazionale.