Events

Fabric Works

*Featured photo: Louise Bourgeois Untitled 2002 Fabric 26.7 x 35.6 x 30.5 cm / 10 1/2 x 14 x 12 in © The Easton Foundation / 2023, ProLitteris, Zurich Courtesy The Easton Foundation and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Christopher Burke

9 July – 9 September 2023
Hauser & Wirth St. Moritz
Via Serlas 22
7500 St. Moritz
Gallery hours: Tuesday – Sunday 11 am – 7 pm
www.hauserwirth.com

‘Fabric Works’ brings together a selection of artworks by a cross generational group of artists from the gallery’s program who have used textiles to push the limits of their respective mediums. Contemporary works by Phyllida Barlow, Frank Bowling and Pipilotti Rist are displayed alongside modern masters, including Louise Bourgeois, Piero Manzoni and Fausto Melotti. The painterly works on view are sewn, patched and haptic, eliciting fundamental questions about the cross-fertilisation of sculpture and painting. Sculptural pieces display unconventional elements of pliability, familiarity and intimacy, challenging associations about the materiality of sculpture.

Pipilotti Rist Yayoi, die erleuchtete Enkelin (dunkelblau pink) (Familie Elektrobranche) 2022 Swimsuit, round metal lamp shade skeleton, frosted glass spherical lamp, fabric cable and plug, clothes hanger, ribbons 80 x 42.5 x 35 cm / 31 1/2 x 16 3/4 x 13 3/4 in © Pipilotti Rist / 2023, ProLitteris Zürich Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth and Luhring Augustine Photo: Studio Rist

Exploring emotions, psychological states and memories, the work of Pipilotti Rist and Louise Bourgeois exists in a space between the visual and the sensual. Rist’s sculptural installation ‘Yayoi, die erleuchtete Enkelin (dunkelblau pink) (Familie Elektrobranche)’ (2022) utilises a swimsuit lit-up from within like a hanging lamp. Focusing attention on the torso, with the fabric becoming a translucent skin, the form rounds off into the hips—an area which is believed to be a storage vessel for emotions, from passion to vexation. Rist gives this heavy area of the body a lightness by making it hollow and illuminated. Speaking on her affinity for using recycled objects, the artist says, ‘The material has stories in it already, lives from other uses, but the tradition also gives a sense of caring, paying attention, thinking twice.’

A life-long hoarder of clothes and household items, Louise Bourgeois—an artist who had an enduring connection to textile and helped pioneer the sculptural use of fabric—transformed her lived materials into art. Using cloth to draw on her own background, ‘Untiled’ (2002) harks back to her childhood in her parents’ tapestry restoration workshop with its tactility and needlework. Lying supine in a vitrine that enhances its vulnerability, the sculpture’s screaming mouth is suggestive of suffering or distress, its colour evocative of a medical bandage, its stitches connoting psychological scarring. ‘I always had the fear of being separated and abandoned,’ said Bourgeois, ‘The sewing is my attempt to keep things together and make things whole.’ Interweaving her memories and emotions, the work demonstrates the artist’s desire to effect psychological repair and mend the past.

Conflating art with the tradition of wall hangings, Bourgeois’ fabric drawings are abstract, exemplified in ‘Untitled’ (2003), and heterogeneous, deriving their formal logic from the juxtapositions of patterns printed on their materials. Their designs evolved to explore more intricate geometries and increasingly incorporated collaged elements. Piero Manzoni also employed untransformed materials, using them in his ground-breaking series of Achromes—works without colour. Exploring the logic of the grid, ‘Achrome’ (1959 – 1960) comprises of canvas squares precisely stitched together using a sewing machine. Creating multiple stitched works—affixed to bases of canvas, burlap or cotton—Manzoni emphasized the textile, and its tactile surface, as the true subject of the work. In doing so, he prompted a radical rethinking of the canvas in relation to artistic production and subverted the mode of painting.

Frank Bowling Yonder 2004 Acrylic and acrylic gel on canvas with marouflage 132 x 80 cm / 52 x 31 1/2 in © Frank Bowling. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2023 Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Damian Griffiths

Frank Bowling also plays with canvas, sewing and collaging the material base, exemplified in ‘Yonder’ (2004). His distinctive, hallmark use of marouflage, which he began using as a structural solution during the 1980s, quite literally frames our view of the colossal central panel, drawing attention to the vivid fabric strips of secondary canvas that form a boarder along the edges of the composition. Bowling also incorporated everyday elements and found objects into the surfaces of his canvas to push the boundaries of painting—most pronounced in ‘Beauty Spot’ (1983) in the form of an embedded egg carton.

Likewise, Phyllida Barlow’s sculptures celebrate inexpensive, low-grade materials such as fabric, concrete, metal cans, plywood and plaster. Bridging sculpture and painting, ‘untitled: littlepaintingonsticks, 1; 2021’ (2021) is coated in vibrant colours, the seams of its construction left visible, revealing the means of its making. Similarly defying traditional definitions of sculpture, Fausto Melotti moved freely among mediums, including textiles, ceramics and metal. Part of his series of ‘teatrini’ (little theatres), ‘Ifigenia (Iphigenia)’ (1978) draws upon the lightness and tactility of the materials from which it is crafted to create a work poised between abstraction and representation, narrative and symbolism. A recurring element of Melotti’s visual language during this period, the fabric sheet symbolically plays with the notion of a fragmented reality, providing a delicate canopy for the whimsical brass landscape beneath. At once still and dynamic, firm and soft, ‘Ifigenia (Iphigenia)’ marks the artist’s subtle redefinition of sculpture. Through the selection of works on view, ‘Fabric Works’ explores the ways in which textiles provide a haptic base for painterly compositions or are used to form works that celebrate the inherent colour, texture and pattern of the cloth, ultimately confronting traditional expectations about the materiality of painting and sculpture.

Fausto Melotti Ifigenia (Iphigenia) 1978 Brass, fabric and bronze 61 x 110 x 28 cm / 24 x 43 1/4 x 11 in © Fondazione Fausto Melotti, Milan Courtesy Fondazione Fausto Melotti and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Damian Griffiths
Eventi

Fabric Works

*Foto in evidenza: Louise Bourgeois Untitled 2002 Fabric 26.7 x 35.6 x 30.5 cm / 10 1/2 x 14 x 12 in © The Easton Foundation / 2023, ProLitteris, Zurich Courtesy The Easton Foundation and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Christopher Burke

9 luglio – 9 settembre 2023
Hauser & Wirth St. Moritz
Via Serlas 22
7500 St. Moritz
Orari della galleria: Martedì – domenica 11.00 – 19.00
www.hauserwirth.com

“Fabric Works” riunisce una selezione di opere d’arte di un gruppo intergenerazionale di artisti del catalogo della galleria che hanno usato i tessuti per superare i limiti dei loro rispettivi medium. Opere contemporanee di Phyllida Barlow, Frank Bowling e Pipilotti Rist sono esposte accanto a quelle di maestri moderni, come Louise Bourgeois, Piero Manzoni e Fausto Melotti. Le opere pittoriche in mostra sono cucite, rattoppate e materiche, e suscitano domande fondamentali sulla contaminazione tra scultura e pittura. Le opere scultoree mostrano elementi non convenzionali di duttilità, familiarità e intimità, sfidando le associazioni sulla materialità della scultura.

Pipilotti Rist Yayoi, die erleuchtete Enkelin (dunkelblau pink) (Familie Elektrobranche) 2022 Swimsuit, round metal lamp shade skeleton, frosted glass spherical lamp, fabric cable and plug, clothes hanger, ribbons 80 x 42.5 x 35 cm / 31 1/2 x 16 3/4 x 13 3/4 in © Pipilotti Rist / 2023, ProLitteris Zürich Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth and Luhring Augustine Photo: Studio Rist

Esplorando emozioni, stati psicologici e ricordi, le opere di Pipilotti Rist e Louise Bourgeois si collocano in uno spazio tra il visivo e il sensoriale. L’installazione scultorea di Rist “Yayoi, die erleuchtete Enkelin (dunkelblau pink) (Familie Elektrobranche)” (2022) utilizza un costume da bagno illuminato dall’interno come una lampada a sospensione. Concentrando l’attenzione sul busto, con il tessuto che diventa una pelle traslucida, la forma si arrotonda verso i fianchi, un’area che si ritiene sia un contenitore di emozioni, dalla passione all’irritazione. Rist conferisce a questa zona pesante del corpo una leggerezza rendendola vuota e illuminata. Parlando della sua affinità con l’uso di oggetti riciclati, l’artista dice: “Il materiale ha già delle storie, vite di altri usi, ma la tradizione dà anche un senso di cura, di attenzione, di ponderazione”.

Louise Bourgeois Untitled 2003 Fabric 28.2 x 37.4 cm / 11 1/8 x 14 3/4 in © The Easton Foundation / 2023, ProLitteris, Zurich Courtesy The Easton Foundation and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Christopher Burke

Accumulatrice per tutta la vita di vestiti e oggetti di casa, Louise Bourgeois – artista che ha avuto un legame duraturo con il tessuto e ha contribuito a creare l’uso scultoreo di quest’ultimo – ha trasformato i suoi materiali vissuti in arte. Utilizzando la stoffa per attingere al proprio background, “Untiled” (2002) ricorda la sua infanzia nel laboratorio di restauro di arazzi dei genitori, con la sua tattilità e il suo lavoro ad ago. La bocca urlante della scultura, adagiata supina in una teca che ne esalta la vulnerabilità, suggerisce sofferenza o angoscia, il suo colore evoca una fasciatura medica, i suoi punti di sutura connotano cicatrici psicologiche. Ho sempre avuto la paura di essere esclusa e abbandonata”, ha detto Bourgeois, “la cucitura è il mio tentativo di tenere insieme le cose e di renderle integre”. Intrecciando i suoi ricordi e le sue emozioni, l’opera dimostra il desiderio dell’artista di riparare psicologicamente e ricucire il passato.

Confrontando l’arte con la tradizione delle tappezzerie, i disegni su tessuto di Bourgeois sono astratti, come nel caso di “Untitled” (2003), ed eterogenei, e derivano la loro logica formale dalla giustapposizione di motivi stampati sui materiali. I loro disegni si sono evoluti esplorando geometrie più intricate e incorporando sempre più elementi di collage. Anche Piero Manzoni ha impiegato materiali non trasformati, utilizzandoli nella sua innovativa serie di Achromes, opere senza colore. Esplorando la logica della griglia, “Achrome” (1959-1960) comprende quadrati di tela cuciti insieme con precisione grazie a una macchina da cucire. Creando opere a cucitura multipla – fissate su basi di tela, iuta o cotone – Manzoni enfatizzò il tessuto, e la sua superficie tattile, come vero soggetto dell’opera. In questo modo, ha dato vita a un ripensamento radicale della tela in relazione alla produzione artistica e ha sovvertito il modo di dipingere.

Frank Bowling Yonder 2004 Acrylic and acrylic gel on canvas with marouflage 132 x 80 cm / 52 x 31 1/2 in © Frank Bowling. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2023 Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Damian Griffiths

Anche Frank Bowling gioca con la tela, cucendo e collagando il materiale di base, come nel caso di “Yonder” (2004). Il suo caratteristico uso del marouflage, che ha iniziato a utilizzare come soluzione strutturale negli anni Ottanta, incornicia letteralmente la nostra visione del colossale pannello centrale, attirando l’attenzione sulle vivaci strisce di tessuto della tela secondaria che formano un bordo lungo i bordi della composizione. Bowling ha anche incorporato elementi quotidiani e oggetti trovati nelle superfici delle sue tele per spingere i confini della pittura, come nel caso di “Beauty Spot” (1983) sotto forma di un cartone per uova integrato.

Allo stesso modo, le sculture di Phyllida Barlow celebrano materiali economici e di bassa qualità come tessuto, cemento, lattine di metallo, compensato e gesso. A cavallo tra scultura e pittura, “untitled: littlepaintingonsticks, 1; 2021” (2021) è rivestita di colori vivaci, le cuciture della sua costruzione sono lasciate a vista, rivelando i mezzi della sua realizzazione. Sfidando le definizioni tradizionali di scultura, Fausto Melotti si è mosso liberamente tra i vari medium, tra cui tessuti, ceramica e metallo. Parte della sua serie di “teatrini”, “Ifigenia” (1978) attinge alla leggerezza e alla tattilità dei materiali con cui è realizzata per creare un’opera in bilico tra astrazione e rappresentazione, narrazione e simbolismo. Elemento ricorrente del linguaggio visivo di Melotti in questo periodo, il lenzuolo di tessuto gioca simbolicamente con la nozione di realtà frammentata, fornendo un delicato baldacchino per il capriccioso paesaggio di ottone sottostante. Al tempo stesso ferma e dinamica, ferma e morbida, “Ifigenia” segna la sottile ridefinizione della scultura da parte dell’artista. Attraverso la selezione di opere in mostra, “Fabric Works” esplora i modi in cui i tessuti forniscono una base tattile per composizioni pittoriche o sono utilizzati per formare opere che celebrano il colore, la consistenza e i motivi intrinseci della stoffa, confrontando in ultima analisi le aspettative tradizionali sulla materialità della pittura e della scultura.

Fausto Melotti Ifigenia (Iphigenia) 1978 Brass, fabric and bronze 61 x 110 x 28 cm / 24 x 43 1/4 x 11 in © Fondazione Fausto Melotti, Milan Courtesy Fondazione Fausto Melotti and Hauser & Wirth Photo: Damian Griffiths