Events

Faig Ahmed: PIR

*Featured photo: Faig Ahmed, Yahya Bakuvi, 2021. Detail. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

Sapar Contemporary Gallery-Incubator
9 N Moore, New York, NY 10013
November 9, 2021 – January 6, 2022
www.saparcontemporary.com | nomad@saparcontemporary.com

Faig Ahmed, Yahya Bakuvi, 2021.Handmade wool carpet 145 5/8 x 51 1/8 inches 370 x 130 cms Width on the floor 244 cm Height from the floor 96 inches/ 243 cm. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

Sapar Contemporary announces Faig Ahmed: PIR, the gallery’s second solo exhibition of work by Azerbaijani artist Faig Ahmed. The exhibition features three large scale new textile works as well as a video work by the artist. The three large carpet works in the exhibitions are titled after poets and spiritual masters whose works had a great influence in the cultural history of Azerbaijan: Shams Tabrizi, Yahya al-Shirvani al-Bakuvi, and Nizami Ganjavi. His title of this exhibition, Pir, encapsulates the multidimensional nature of his work. The ancient Greek word for fire is pyr (πυρ), whereas the word pir in Persian, Turkish, and Arabic means elder or spiritual guide in Sufism, connecting to the three poet-scholars associated with Faig’s artworks. Finally, one of the etymologies of the word Azerbaijan is ‘the Land Protected by Holy Fire,’ as it relates to the ancient Zoroastrian religion established in the region centuries ago. Artist’s works are conceived with complex layers of historical, literary, mystical, and craft associations. In her essay about the works Fahmida Suleman evokes Rumi’s poem where he likens the entire universe and all that it contains to a carpet created by the divine Carpet-Spreader. Ahmed himself she suggests can be described as a cultural iconoclast who willfully breaks down established forms and boundaries. Ahmed’s works are sites of his own cultural geography, a tapestry of cultural and political history, language, spiritual values, and art. We are fortunate to be co-travelers along his journey.

Pir: Divine Fires and Mystic Guides

Essay by Fahmida Suleman, Ph.D. Curator, Islamic World, Royal Ontario Museum

When the mirror of your heart becomes clear and pure, you will behold images (which are) outside of (the world of) water and earth.
You will behold both the image and the Image-Maker, both the carpet of (spiritual) empire and the Carpet-Spreader.

Jalal al-Din Rumi

Images of weaving, carpets, and textiles abound in medieval Sufi mystical poetry, especially Sufi mystical poetry. The verses by the famed Sufi master Jalal al-Din Rumi (d.1273) identify God as an artist or image-maker and the spiritual realm as a marvelous carpet (farsh), spread open by the all-powerful and all-knowing Carpet-Spreader (farrash). In another verse, Rumi likens the entire universe and all that it contains to a carpet created by the divine Carpet-Spreader. The carpet is a metaphor for creation, bursting with life and full of human stories and emotions, always evolving. Faig Ahmed’s carpets also burst with stories and emotions. He refers to them as ‘cultural geographies’ with distinct histories, personalities, and languages spun within their threads and interwoven in their designs and colours. Faig can be described as a cultural iconoclast. He willfully breaks down and questions long-established and accepted forms and boundaries. During this process, which at times is purposeful and at other times in the realm of his subconscious, he creates powerful and compelling artworks underpinned by his new conceptual framework.

In this series, Faig identifies each of his three works with an important medieval figure connected to his homeland, Azerbaijan. Each figure is a creative disruptor, an innovator, someone who shakes things up, and yet, is a product of his own cultural geography. The earliest is the famous poet-scholar, Abu Muhammad Ilyas ibn Yusuf ibn Zaki Mu’ayyad, known by his pen-name Nizami Ganjavi (1141–1209). He was born and lived his entire life in Ganja (hence the nisba or sobriquet ‘Ganjavi’ in his name), in the Arran region of Azerbaijan. Describing himself as ‘a jeweller working with precious gems to create a poetic treasure,’ Nizami managed to retain his independence of belief and artistic expression by refusing positions as an official court poet. His greatest contribution to world literature is his Khamsa (‘Quintet’), five long poems that deal with philosophical themes of human virtue, wisdom, and ethics through timeless stories of love, romance, action, and adventure.

Faig Ahmed, Nizami Ganjavi, 2021 Handmade wool carpet 1/3 (3/3+AP) 119 x 50 inches 302.3 x 127 cms Width of the pile on the bottom 170 cm/67 inch. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

Described as one of the most beautiful cities of Western Asia, Nizami’s Ganja was the capital of Arran region in Transcaucasian Azerbaijan, a flourishing hub of wool and silk manufacture and trade. The southern part of Arran includes the ethnically diverse region of Karabakh (or Karabagh), a centuries-old centre of rug production run by expert female weavers. Faig has designed a Karabakh prayer rug following a Ganja pattern as a tribute to Nizami, using deep reds and contrasting golden yellows with geometric and floral patterns that recall a chahar-bagh or four-part Islamic garden. For Faig, the spirit of this rug represents the people of this region who are equally bold, courageous, and outspoken.

In contrast, Faig’s second work is dedicated to a figure who was a complete outlier of his time and of whom we know very little about – the mystical mentor of Rumi, Shams al-Din Tabrizi (1185–1248). Described as an overpowering person who ‘shocked people by his remarks and harsh words,’ Shams was born in Tabriz, the capital of Iran’s East Azerbaijan Province which was a renowned place of literature, spirituality, and mysticism. The intensity of Rumi’s relationship with this dervish overwhelmed his family and disciples and ultimately led to Shams’murder. His death was a turning point for Rumi’s spirituality and path of Sufism, inspiring him to compose his book of lyrical poetry, Diwan-i Shams Tabrizi (Poems of Shams Tabrizi). In one poem, Rumi describes God as the Great Weaver:

Weave not, like spiders, nets from grief’s saliva In which the weft and warp are both decaying. But give the grief to Him, Who granted it,

And do not talk about it anymore.

When you are silent, His speech is your speech, When you don’t weave, the weaver will be He.

Here, Rumi likens our lives, full of ups and downs, to carpets which we constantly strive to control as weavers in an effort to dictate our outcomes like the designs and colours on a loom. Rumi advises that we must trust the Great Weaver who has ultimate control and awareness of the patterns of each of our carpets. Rumi’s symbolic use of weaving in this poem may have also been a direct reference to Shams, who was thought to be an itinerant weaver by profession.

Tabriz has also been a centre for finely produced carpets for centuries. In contrast to the Karabagh rugs, Tabrizi weavers have a preference for detailed floral patterns often anchored by a central sunburst or multi-lobed medallion (shamsa). Such carpet designs also appeared on courtly book bindings, illuminated manuscripts, ceramic and metal vessels, and architectural tilework. Faig’s Shams Tabrizi carpet surges with organic, swirling floral and vegetal motifs in jewelled tones of silk that gradually dissolve into a black woollen space of nothingness, much like the final stages of a mystic’s spiritual journey: annihilation (fana’) of one’s individual ego within the divine presence, like the flame of a candle in the presence of the sun.

Faig Ahmed, Shams Tabrizi, 2021 Handmade wool and silk carpet 157 1/8 x 50 inches 399.1 x 127 cms Width on the floor 256 cm Height from the floor 100 inches /254 cm. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

The stage of fana’ resonates in the poetry of Shaykh Yahya al-Shirvani al-Bakuvi (1410–1464), the 15th-century Azerbaijani mystic commemorated in Faig’s final work: ‘Sacrifice both your being and faith; then you will be able to see the beauty of your Beloved.’ Born in Shirvan and buried in Baku, Shaykh Yahya was the second pir or spiritual master of the Khalwatiyya Sufi order which spread across the Ottoman Empire and beyond to Southeast Asia. An important foundation of the order was the practice of khalwat or spiritual retreat combined with voluntary hunger, silence, seclusion, and meditation. Faig’s work in honour of Shaykh Yahya follows a sophisticated and finely-knotted Shirvan carpet design with a symmetrical composition of geometric patterns and a more muted palette than the other works. He describes the characteristics of the people of Shirvan as straightforward and direct but not abrasive, ‘they remain quiet and listen, but tell you what they think in the end.’ This work exudes a meditative and spiritual quality that befits the association with Shaykh Yahya and the Khalwatiyya order.

Faig’s works are conceived with complex layers of historical, literary, mystical, and craft associations. He works closely with his female weavers throughout the process of making as he recognizes and respects the creative power of the women who harness their ancestral knowledge of carpet weaving which has withstood the test of time despite over 70 years of political upheaval and restrictions faced in Azerbaijan during Soviet rule. Through his art, Faig is on a journey of self-reflection and discovery to piece together the many facets of his identity, past and present. Although he did not grow up immersed in Islamic tradition, Sufism or the literary heritage of his forefathers, there were hints of this around him as a child. His great, great grandmother wove her own carpets for her bridal dowry as was customary in her time and his father memorized verses of Nizami by heart.

His chosen title of this exhibition, Pir, encapsulates the multidimensional nature of his work. The ancient Greek word for fire is pyr (πυρ), whereas the word pir in Persian, Turkish, and Arabic means elder or spiritual guide in Sufism, connecting to the three poet-scholars associated with Faig’s artworks. Finally, one of the etymologies of the word Azerbaijan is ‘the Land Protected by Holy Fire,’ or simply, ‘the Land of the Fire’ as it relates to the ancient Zoroastrian religion established in the region centuries ago, of which traces still remain with the presence of fire temples in different parts of the country. Faig’s works are truly sites of his own cultural geography, a tapestry of cultural and political history, language, spiritual values, and art. We are fortunate to be co-travellers along his journey.

Eventi

Faig Ahmed: PIR

Traduzione a cura di Tina Porricelli

*Foto uin evidenza: Faig Ahmed, Yahya Bakuvi, 2021. Detail. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

Sapar Contemporary Gallery-Incubator
9 N Moore, New York, NY 10013
9 Novembre, 2021 – 6 Gennaio, 2022
www.saparcontemporary.com | nomad@saparcontemporary.com

Faig Ahmed, Yahya Bakuvi, 2021.Handmade wool carpet 145 5/8 x 51 1/8 inches 370 x 130 cms Width on the floor 244 cm Height from the floor 96 inches/ 243 cm. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

La Sapar Contemporary annuncia Pyr: la seconda mostra dell’artista azero/azerbaigiano Faig Ahmed. La mostra comprende tre nuove opere in materiale tessile di grandi dimensioni e un lavoro in formato video dell’artista. Le tre grandi opere-tappeto prendono il titolo da poeti e maestri spirituali i cui lavori hanno avuto grande influenza sulla storia culturale dell’Azerbaigian: Shams Tabrizi, Yahya al-Shirvani al-Bakuvi, e Nizami Ganjavi. Il titolo di questa mostra, Pir, racchiude la natura multidimensionale del suo lavoro. Il termine ‘fuoco’ in Greco antico si traduce pyr (πυρ), mentre la parola pir in persiano, Turco e Arabo significa ‘anziano’ o ‘guida spirituale’ per i Sufisti, che si collega ai tre poeti-studiosi associati alle opere di Faig. In ultimo, una delle etimologie della parola Azerbaigian è “la terra protetta dal Fuoco Sacro” in quanto si rifà all’antica religione Zoroastriana sviluppatasi nella regione secoli prima. Le opere dell’artista vengono concepite con livelli complessi di associazioni storiche, letterarie, mistiche, e artigianali. Nel suo saggio, Fahmida Suleman evoca la poesia di Rumi in cui egli paragona l’universo e tutto ciò che esso contiene a un tappeto creato dal divino Carpet-Spreader (Mercante di tappeti). Ahmed stesso, suggerisce lei, può essere descritto come un iconoclasta culturale che distrugge con determinazione forme e confini prestabiliti. Le opere di Ahmed rappresentano i luoghi della propria geografia culturale, un arazzo di storia politica e culturale, linguaggio, valori spirituali e arte. Siamo fortunati a poterlo accompagnare in questo viaggio.

Pir: Divine Fires and Mystic Guides

Essay by Fahmida Suleman, Ph.D. Curator, Islamic World, Royal Ontario Museum

*When the mirror of your heart becomes clear and pure, you will behold images (which are) outside of (the world of) water and earth.
You will behold both the image and the Image-Maker, both the carpet of (spiritual) empire and the Carpet-Spreader.

Jalal al-Din Rumi

*Quando lo specchio del tuo cuore diventerà chiaro e puro, vedrai immagini (che sono) al di fuori del mondo dell’acqua e della terra.
Vedrai sia l’immagine sia colui che crea l’immagine, sia il tappeto dell’impero (spirituale) sia il mercante di tappeti.

 

Immagini di tessitura, tappeti e tessili abbondano nella poesia mistica del Sufismo medievale. I versi del celebre maestro Sufi Jalal al-Din Rumi (morto nel 1273) identificano Dio come un artista o un creatore d’immagini e il mondo spirituale come un tappeto fantastico (farrash) [‘servitore’ in Indi]. In un altro verso, Rumi paragona l’intero universo e tutto ciò che esso contiene a un tappeto creato dal divino Carpet-Spreader [propagatore di tappeti]. Il tappeto è metafora di creazione, piena di vita e ricca di storie umane ed emozioni in continua evoluzione. E così anche i tappeti di Faig Ahmed sono pieni di storie ed emozioni. Si riferisce a loro come ‘geografie culturali’ con storie, personalità e linguaggi distinti tessuti nei loro fili e intrecciati nelle loro forme e colori. Faig può essere descritto come un iconoclasta culturale. Egli distrugge e mette in discussione forme e confini prestabiliti. In questo processo, che a volte è intenzionale e altre volte si realizza nel regno del subconscio, crea opere potenti e avvincenti sorrette dalla sua nuova struttura concettuale.

In questa serie, Faig identifica ciascuna delle sue tre opere con un importante figura medievale legata al suo paese d’origine, l’Azerbaigian. Ogni figura è perturbazione creativa, innovazione, qualcuno che mescola le cose e, allo stesso tempo, il prodotto della propria geografia culturale. Il più antico è il famoso poeta erudito Abu Muhammad Ilyas ibn Yusuf ibn Zaki Mu’ayyad, conosciuto con lo pseudonimo Nizami Ganjavi (1141–1209). Nacque e trascorse tutta la sua vita a Ganja (da cui il nisba o sopranome Ganjavi) nella regione di Arran in l’Azerbaigian. Descrivendosi come “un gioielliere che lavora con gemme preziose per creare un tesoro poetico”, Nizami riuscì a mantenere una propria indipendenza nella sua fede ed espressione artistica rifiutando la posizione di poeta ufficiale di corte. Il suo più grande contributo alla letteratura mondiale è Khamsa (“Quintetto”), cinque lunghe poesie che trattano delle virtù umane della saggezza e dell’etica attraverso storie di amore senza tempo, romanticismo, azione e avventura.

Faig Ahmed, Nizami Ganjavi, 2021 Handmade wool carpet 1/3 (3/3+AP) 119 x 50 inches 302.3 x 127 cms Width of the pile on the bottom 170 cm/67 inch. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

Descritta come una delle città più belle dell’Asia Occidentale, la Ganja di Nizami era la capitale della regione Arran nell’Azerbaigian Transcaucasico, un fiorente centro di produzione e commercio di lana e seta. La parte meridionale di Aran comprende la regione etnicamente eterogenea di Karabakh (o Karabagh), un centro secolare di produzione di tappeti gestito da esperte tessitrici. Come tributo a Nizamiun, Faig ha creato un tappeto da preghiera di Karabakh seguendo una trama tipica di Ganja, utilizzando rossi scuri e contrastanti tonalità di giallo dorato con trame geometriche e floreali che richiamano un chahar-bagh o giardino Islamico composto da quattro parti. Per Faig lo spirito di questo tappeto rappresenta gli abitanti di questa regione, anch’essi audaci, coraggiosi e schietti.

La seconda opera di Faig invece è dedicata a una figura che è stata un’eccezione del suo tempo e di cui sappiamo molto poco – il mentore mistico di Rumi, Shams al-Din Tabrizi (1185–1248). Descritta come una persona travolgente che “scioccava le persone con i propri commenti e le sue parole taglienti”, Shams nacque a Tabriz, la capitale della provincia dell’Azerbaigian Orientale in Iran, luogo rinomato per la letteratura, la spiritualità e il misticismo. L’intensità del rapporto di Rumi con questo derviscio travolse la sua famiglia e i suoi discepoli e infine portò all’omicidio di Shams. La sua morte fu un punto di svolta per la spiritualità e la pratica del Sufismo di Rumi, lo indusse a comporre il libro di poesie Diwan-i Shams Tabrizi (Poesie di Shams Tabrizi). In una poesia Rumi descrive Dio come il Grande Tessitore:

Non tessete, come ragni, reti con la saliva del dolore in cui trama e ordito decadono. Ma date invece il dolore a Lui, che ve l’ha dato,

E non parlatene più.

Quando siete in silenzio, le Sue parole sono le vostre parole, quando non tessete, è Lui a tessere.

Qui, Rumi paragona le nostre vite, piene di alti e bassi, a tappeti che cerchiamo sempre di controllare come tessitori, nel tentativo di determinare il nostro fato come le forme e i colori in un telaio. Rumi consiglia di fidarsi del Grande Tessitore che ha controllo supremo e conoscenza delle trame di ogni nostro tappeto. L’uso simbolico che Rumi fa della tessitura in questa poesia potrebbe anche essere un riferimento diretto a Shams, che si pensa sia stato un tessitore itinerante di mestiere.

Tabriz era anche stata un centro secolare della produzione di tappeti di lusso. A differenza dei tappeti di Karabagh, i tessitori di Tabriz prediligono disegni floreali dettagliati, spesso con un sole o un medaglione centrale (shamsa). Queste trame sui tappeti apparivano anche sulle rilegature dei libri di corte, manoscritti miniati, oggetti di ceramica e metallo e mattonelle. Il tappeto di Shams Tabrizi di Faig s’innalza con motivi organici, floreali, e vegetali in toni preziosi di seta che gradualmente si dissolvono in uno spazio di lana nera che rappresenta il nulla, come le tappe finali del cammino spirituale di un mistico: l’annientamento (fana’) dell’ego individuale alla presenza divina, come la fiamma di una candela in presenza del sole.

Faig Ahmed, Shams Tabrizi, 2021 Handmade wool and silk carpet 157 1/8 x 50 inches 399.1 x 127 cms Width on the floor 256 cm Height from the floor 100 inches /254 cm. Courtesy of Faig Ahmed

Lo stadio di fana’ risuona nella poesia di Shaykh Yahya al-Shirvani al-Bakuvi (1410–1464), il mistico Azerbaigiano del XV secolo commemorato nell’opera finale di Faig: ‘Sacrifica sia il tuo essere sia la tua fede; allora potrai vedere la belleza del tuo Amato’. Nato a Shirvan e sepolto a Baku, Shayk Yahya fu il secondo pir o maestro spirituale dell’ordine Sufi Khalwatiyya che si estendeva attraverso l’Impero Ottomano e oltre nel Sudest Asiatico. Un importante fondamento dell’ordine era la pratica del khalwat o ritiro spirituale combinato alla digiuno volontario, al silenzio, alla reclusione e alla meditazione. L’opera di Faig in onore di Shaykh Yahya riprende un tappeto di Shirvan sofisticato e finemente annodato con una composizione simmetrica di trame geometriche e tonalità più sommese di quelle degli altri lavori. Descrive le caratteristiche del popolo di Shirvan come semplici e dirette ma non irritanti, “rimangono silenziose e ascoltano, ma ti dicono cosa pensano alla fine”. Questo lavoro emana una qualità meditativa e spirituale che ben si addice all’associazione con Shaykh Yahya e all’ordine della Khalwatiyya.

Le opere di Faig vengono ideate con sovrapposizioni complesse di associazioni storiche, letterarie, mistiche e artigianali. Lavora a stretto contatto con le sue tessitrici durante tutto il processo produttivo, riconoscendo e rispettando il potere creativo delle donne che utilizzano la loro antica conoscenza della tessitura dei tappeti, che ha resistito alla prova del tempo nonostante oltre settant’anni di disordini politici e restrizioni subiti in Azerbaigian durante il dominio Sovietico. Attraverso la sua arte, Faig intraprende un viaggio di introspezione e scoperta di sé per ricomporre le diverse sfaccettature della sua identità, passata e presente. Sebbene non sia cresciuto nella tradizione Islamica, nel Sufismo o nel patrimonio letterario dei suoi antenati vi erano tracce di ciò nella sua infanzia. La sua trisavola realizzò i tappeti per la sua dote nuziale, com’era consuetudine al tempo e il padre di Faig conosceva a memoria i versi di Nizami.

Il titolo scelto per la mostra, Pir, racchiude in sé la natura multidimensionale del suo lavoro. L’antica parola greca per ‘fuoco’ è pyr (πυρ), mentre la parola pir in persiano, Turco e Arabo significa ‘anziano’ o ‘guida spirituale’ nel Sufismo, che si collega ai tre poeti-studiosi associati con le opere di Faig. Infine, una delle etimologie della parola ‘Azerbaigian’ è ‘la terra protetta dal Fuoco Sacro’ o semplicemente ‘La Terra del Fuoco in quanto si riferisce all’antica religione Zoroastriana sviluppatasi nella regione secoli prima e di cui restano tracce con la presenza di templi del fuoco in diverse parti del paese.

Le opere di Faig sono luoghi della sua geografia culturale, un arazzo di storia culturale e politica, lingua, valori spirituali e arte. Siamo fortunati ad essere suoi compagni di viaggio durante questo suo percorso.