Interview

Interview– Quilt Collector Bill Volckening, Portland, Oregon, USA

INTERVIEW – Quilt Collector Bill Volckening, Portland, Oregon, USA

Hi Bill, many of us Italian quilters, virtually know you for your facebook page and your very interesting blog “Wonkyworld”.

http://willywonkyquilts.blogspot.com

Your study work, collecting and information gathering on the history of quilt in America, is remarkable and very important.

For our first issue of our magazine, we would like to start with an overview of the rich world of American quilting collectionism and  its history.

Thank you! Before now, the everyday activities of collectors were not usually seen by the public. When I document my collecting activities in a blog or social media post, it begins to reveal the process of collecting—and it is different in the 21st century than it was in the past. We are living in the information age, and I am among the first group of collectors actively using the internet. I buy quilts from online auctions and use social media to share them. I talk about being a collector and what it’s like to collect today.

I ask you some questions, but you feel absolutely free to add others, to talk about quilting freely, giving our readers all the information you’ll want.

My first question is perhaps a little obvious: when you started collecting quilts and why?

I started collecting quilts in 1989, when a girlfriend from Germany and I were in New York City. She brought me to a private showing and sale of old quilts hosted by Shelly Zegart, and I fell in love with a wonderful, old quilt.

I wrote all about it in a blog post for “Why Quilts Matter, History, Art & Politics”

Link: http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/guest-blogger-series/guest-blogger-eureka-moment-by-bill-volckening/

Which is the first quilt you have bought?

It was an 1850s, red, white and green pieced quilt from Kentucky. The pattern is known today as New York Beauty, but we do not know who the maker was, or what the maker called it. The name of the pattern came much later, in the 1930s, when Mountain Mist released a pattern with that name. After that point, New York Beauty started to become the popular name for the pattern, but we still do not know what it would have been called in the 1850s. New York Beauty is more of a modern name.

Volckening1

Photo: Pieced quilt, c. 1850, Kentucky. My first antique quilt was very graphic and modern looking, but also finely made and in good condition.

Do you only buy quilts from the American tradition, or do you also look for old quilts from other manufacturers? Europeans for example?

I admire quilts from other places, but focus on collecting American quilts. The history of quiltmaking in America reads like an art history book, with distinct styles of quiltmaking in specific periods. A lot of the quilts are surprisingly modern looking for their age. There was a lot of originality and creativity in quilts, and of course, they represent the longest unbroken chain of women’s creative expression in America.

Volckening2

Photo: Applique quilt, c. 1850, United States. This quilt includes an unusual cardoon motif and meandering floral vine border.

Volckening3

Photo: Pieced hexagon pictorial quilt, c. 1900, Pennsylvania. One of the most unusual quilts in the collection is this pictorial quilt from the Lancaster region of Pennsylvania.

Volckening4

Photo: Pieced quilt, c. 1910, United States. This modern looking one-patch variant includes ten fabrics cleverly pieced in strips in gradation, offset to create an overall zigzag design.

Volckening5

Photo: Pieced and appliqued quilt, c. 1920, Wisconsin. Bold and modern, this quilt was originally sold as a “cutter”—a quilt in poor condition that could be cut up and used for crafting projects. Its condition flaws were minor, and the quilt was clearly a masterpiece of modernism in American quilts, so it will never be cut into pieces.

Can you talk about the different types of fabrics that were used in different age?

Quiltmakers use what is available, and throughout history there were various materials that were popular at different times. Some of the early quilts made in America are wool and linen. Others are cotton, and cotton has really been the most popular fabric in American quilts. In the Victorian period, silk, satin and velvet were popular, and in the 1970s, polyester was used a lot. Today, quiltmakers use all types of fabrics, but primarily cottons.

Volckening6

Photo: Giant Dahlia, c. 1935, United States. “The Giant Dahlia” is one of several large medallion quilt patterns designed by Hubert ver Mehren of Des Moines, Iowa. An unknown maker made this quilt, closely following the pattern.

Can you tell us about the quilts of your collection? Is there one quilt or block you are particularly fond and whose story you would like to tell?

I spent many years collecting and researching the pattern we call New York Beauty, and the information was included in my first book, “New York Beauty, Quilts from the Volckening Collection”. Today, I prefer to focus more on how and when naming quilt patterns started to become part of the tradition.

In the middle to late 1800s, there were magazines such as Godey’s Lady’s Book, which presented some patchwork patterns but did not give the patterns any names. Later publications from around the turn of the century (1890s and later) included names for patterns. Pattern names were sometimes based on tradition, but they were really more part of the marketing efforts.

Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns includes references with each pattern, and you can read more about the origins of each source publication in the back. I urge other historians to look at these references, but often they do not look at them. The references are key to understanding how pattern naming became part of the American quiltmaking tradition.

Volckening7

Photo: Piecedquilt, c. 1870, Virginia.

In your book “The New York Beauty”, present your collection of quilts collected in twenty years of research and you tell the history of this particularly fascinating block.

Can you tell us something about the story of this pattern?

The pattern first appeared in the middle 19th century, when quiltmakers in America experimented with complex, geometric designs. Some of the oldest examples of the quilts were found in the southeastern United States, in places such as Kentucky, Tennessee, and North and South Carolina.

Southern quilt historians do not like the name “New York Beauty” and argue for other names as the “original” or “early” names, but there is really no evidence to support those claims.

The name “New York Beauty” first appeared in publication in 1930, when Mountain Mist used the name for one of its quilt patterns. The historic account printed with the pattern said it was an old name, but it was not. The pattern was inspired by an older quilt, now part of the Mountain Mist Collection at the International Quilt Study Center and Museum. The person who originally owned the inspiration quilt called it a New York Beauty, and it was most likely a name one family used rather than the official name for it. The name was soon adopted by the masses, and I think it was because the design elements were related to New York, the Statue of Liberty and the art deco crown ornamentation of the Chrysler Building.

In your collection there are many quilts from the 70s. Not everyone recognizes the cultural value of the quilts sewn in those years, often in polyester and not in cotton. Can you explain us the reasons of your choice?

I was a child in the 1970s. Although our family did not make quilts, the quilts of the 1970s remind me of my childhood.

America experienced a significant quiltmaking revival in the 1970s. The 1976 Bicentennial celebration gave people a reason to explore and revive quiltmaking, so millions of Americans started to make quilts for the first time in the 1970s.

When I began learning about quilt history in America, historians often referred to the great American quiltmaking revival of the 1970s, but nobody seemed to have a collection of the quilts. The period was among the most important in American quiltmaking because it also revived the quilt industry, which is today a thriving, multibillion-dollar industry.

Polyester is interesting for many reasons, but in terms of its purely visual qualities, the material resists fading, and the colors are exceptionally vibrant. When we see polyester quilts from the 1970s, there is no question about what the original colors could have been since the quilts did not fade.

When I began collecting quilts of the 1970s, hardly anyone else was collecting them, so the quilts were inexpensive and increasingly available. I purchased many of them for $50 or less, but sometimes people gave them to me for free.

I saw beauty in the quilts other people did not want, and now a lot of other people see the same beauty I do.

Volckening8

Photo: Tile Blocks, c. 1975, Louisiana. This quilt is a monumental-scale, polyester double knit sampler, embellished with black rick rack.

Your rich collection is the protagonist of many exhibitions in the United States. What are the quilts that have been most successful with the public?

Each group of quilts appeals to its own audience, and each collection has traveled to different places. The New York Beauty quilts were the subject of my first book, published by Quiltmania in 2015. That year, 50 of the quilts from the book were displayed at Salon Pour l’Amour du Fil in Nantes, France.

In the same year, I also had my first exhibitions of 1970s quilts, at QuiltCon in Austin, Texas and at the Benton County Museum here in Oregon. In 2017, a select group of 1970s polyester quilts appeared in an exhibition at the International Quilt Study Center & Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska.

 

I am currently working on a collection of Hawaiian scrap quilts, exploring a new, undocumented tradition of patchwork made of scraps from the mid-to-late 20th century Hawaiian garment industry. It’s going to be a real eye-opener for quilt lovers, especially people who are only familiar with traditional Hawaiian applique quilts.

I love the opportunities to exhibit quilts, but often feel like more people see the quilts when they appear in publications such as magazines and books. Because I want as many people as possible to see the quilts, I share photos as often as I can.

Volckening9

Photo: 1970s Dresden plate, a nice example of the eye-popping colors seen in 1970s quilts.

Volckening10

Photo: Hawaiian scrap quilt from the 1970s.

But besides being a collector you are also an artist!  Your quilts have been published in magazines and have won awards.

Tell us about your quilts, where you get inspiration and what you like to do … and do not forget to send us pictures of your art quilts and your collection!

Before I was a collector, I went to art school and set out to be a photographer. I have always enjoyed expressing myself creatively, and quiltmaking is one of many ways. I have made about ten quilts, even though I am not very good at sewing. I like to think about quilt history when I make a quilt, mostly because I want the work to be something new and different, and I always want it to reveal my individual point of view as an artist.

Although I do not sew often or make many quilts, I use photography a lot. I do all my own photography of the quilts in my collection, including the shooting and Photoshop editing. Being able to produce photos of quilts helps me share them with a large audience.

Volckening11

Photo: “Wild Eyed Susans” (2014) by Bill Volckening. This wool quilt was made with repurposed pieces of a vintage quilt, plus embellishments.

Volckening12

Photo: “Fruity Beauty” (2015) by Bill Volckening, quilted by Jolene Knight. This quilt was made with digitally printed Spoonflower fabrics by Bill Volckening.

To conclude, we hope to have the pleasure of being able to host your collection here in Italy. It would be a fantastic experience and a great opportunity to admire these works, which constitute an important piece of the history and culture of Textile Art.

Thank you.

Interviste

Intervista a Bill Volckening

Intervista a Bill Volckening, collezionista di quilt, Portland,Oregon, USA.

Ciao Bill, molti di noi ti conoscono virtualmente grazie alla tua pagina facebook e al tuo blog “Wonkyworld”.

Wonkyworld”

Il tuo lavoro di studio, raccolta e divulgazione di informazioni sulla storia del quilt in America è notevole e decisamente interessante.

L’ “Artemorbida”si occupa delle arti tessili, con particolare attenzione al mondo ricco e variegato dell’Art quilting internazionale.

Per il primo numero, abbiamo pensato che sarebbe stato interessante iniziare con una panoramica sulla realtà del collezionismo americano e la sua storia.

Grazie! Prima d’ora, le attività quotidiane dei collezionisti non erano solitamente note al pubblico. Quando documento le mie attività di collezionista in un blog o scrivo un post su un social media, inizio a rivelare in cosa consiste il processo di raccolta – che è diverso nel 21 ° secolo rispetto al passato. Viviamo nell’era dell’informazione e io sono in un primo gruppo di collezionisti che utilizza attivamente Internet. Compro trapunte dalle aste online e uso i social media per condividerle. Racconto cosa vuol dire essere un collezionista oggi.

Grazie! Prima d’ora, le attività quotidiane dei collezionisti non erano solitamente note al pubblico. Quando documento le mie attività di collezionista in un blog o scrivo un post su un social media, inizio a rivelare in cosa consiste il processo di raccolta – che è diverso nel 21 ° secolo rispetto al passato. Viviamo nell’era dell’informazione e io sono in un primo gruppo di collezionisti che utilizza attivamente Internet. Compro trapunte dalle aste online e uso i social media per condividerle. Racconto cosa vuol dire essere un collezionista oggi.

La prima domanda che ti faccio è d’obbligo, ma certamente un po’ scontata: quando hai iniziato a collezionare quilt e perchè?

Ho iniziato a collezionare quilt nel 1989, quando la mia fidanzata tedesca e io eravamo a New York City. Lei mi portò ad una mostra privata tenuta da  Shelly Zegart,in cui si vendevano anche antiche trapunte e mi sono innamorato di una meravigliosa trapunta.

Ho iniziato a collezionare quilt nel 1989, quando la mia fidanzata tedesca e io eravamo a New York City. Lei mi portò ad una mostra privata tenuta da  Shelly Zegart,in cui si vendevano anche antiche trapunte e mi sono innamorato di una meravigliosa trapunta.

Su questo ho scritto diffusamente in un post sul blog di “WhyQuiltsMatter, History, Art &Politics”

Su questo ho scritto diffusamente in un post sul blog di “WhyQuiltsMatter, History, Art &Politics”
Link:
http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/guest-blogger-series/guest-blogger-eureka-moment-by-bill-volckening/

Qual è il primo quilt che hai acquistato?

“Era una trapunta del 1850, rossa, bianca e verde, proveniente dal Kentucky. Il modello è conosciuto oggi con il nome di New York Beauty, ma non sappiamo chi fosse il creatore o come lo chiamò. Il nome NYB venne dato a questo pattern  molto dopo, negli anni ’30, quando Mountain Mist pubblicò un pattern chiamato così. Da quel momento in poi, New York Beauty divenne il nome popolare del modello. New York Beauty è più di un nome moderno”.

“Era una trapunta del 1850, rossa, bianca e verde, proveniente dal Kentucky. Il modello è conosciuto oggi con il nome di New York Beauty, ma non sappiamo chi fosse il creatore o come lo chiamò. Il nome NYB venne dato a questo pattern  molto dopo, negli anni ’30, quando Mountain Mist pubblicò un pattern chiamato così. Da quel momento in poi, New York Beauty divenne il nome popolare del modello. New York Beauty è più di un nome moderno”.
Foto 1 – Pieced quilt, c. 1850, Kentucky.“La mia prima trapunta antica era molto grafica e moderna, ma anche finemente realizzata e in buone condizioni”.

Ammiro le trapunte di altre tradizioni, ma mi concentro sulla raccolta di trapunte americane. La storia del quiltmaking in America fa parte della storia dell’arte americana, infatti i quilt della tradizione presentano stili diversi a seconda dell’epoca in cui sono stati creati. Molte delle trapunte sono sorprendentemente moderne per la loro epoca.Questi quilt sono molto originali e naturalmente rappresentano, con continuità, il modo in cui si è espressa la creatività delle donne americane nelle varie epoche.

Volckening2

Foto 2 – Quilt in applique, c. 1850, Stati Uniti.“Questa trapunta include un insolito motivo a cardo e un sinuoso bordo floreale”.

Volckening3

Foto 3 – Piecedquilt, c. 1900, in Pennsylvania.Una delle trapunte più insolite della collezione è questa trapunta pittorica della regione di Lancaster, in Pennsylvania.

Volckening4

Foto 4–Pieced one-patch quilt, c. 1910, Stati Uniti. “Questa moderna variante comprende dieci tessuti abilmente assemblati a strisce in gradazione, sfalsati per creare un disegno a zigzag”.

Volckening5

Foto 5 – Pieced and applique quilt, c. 1920, Wisconsin.“Audace e moderna, questa trapunta veniva venduta originariamente per essere tagliata e utilizzata per realizzare altri progetti, poiché era in pessime condizioni.I suoi difetti erano meno gravi del previsto, e soprattutto questo quiltsi rivelò chiaramente un capolavoro del modernismo del quilting americano. Sicuramente non verrà mai tagliata e ridotta in  pezze per altri progetti.

Puoi parlarci dei differenti tipi di stoffe che venivano usati nelle varie epoche per cucire quilt?

Ammiro le trapunte di altre tradizioni, ma mi concentro sulla raccolta di trapunte americane. La storia del quiltmaking in America fa parte della storia dell’arte americana, infatti i quilt della tradizione presentano stili diversi a seconda dell’epoca in cui sono stati creati. Molte delle trapunte sono sorprendentemente moderne per la loro epoca.Questi quilt sono molto originali e naturalmente rappresentano, con continuità, il modo in cui si è espressa la creatività delle donne americane nelle varie epoche.
Foto 2 – Quilt in applique, c. 1850, Stati Uniti.“Questa trapunta include un insolito motivo a cardo e un sinuoso bordo floreale”.
Foto 3 – Piecedquilt, c. 1900, in Pennsylvania.Una delle trapunte più insolite della collezione è questa trapunta pittorica della regione di Lancaster, in Pennsylvania.
Foto 4–Pieced one-patch quilt, c. 1910, Stati Uniti. “Questa moderna variante comprende dieci tessuti abilmente assemblati a strisce in gradazione, sfalsati per creare un disegno a zigzag”.
Foto 5 – Pieced and applique quilt, c. 1920, Wisconsin.“Audace e moderna, questa trapunta veniva venduta originariamente per essere tagliata e utilizzata per realizzare altri progetti, poiché era in pessime condizioni.I suoi difetti erano meno gravi del previsto, e soprattutto questo quiltsi rivelò chiaramente un capolavoro del modernismo del quilting americano. Sicuramente non verrà mai tagliata e ridotta in  pezze per altri progetti.

I Quiltmakers usano ciò che è disponibile, ma nelle varie epoche ci sono stati alcuni materiali più popolari e usati di altri.Una buona parte dei primi quiltcucini in America eradi lana e lino. Altri erano di cotone e il cotone è stato il tessuto più popolare nelle trapunte americane. Nel periodo vittoriano, la seta, il raso e il velluto erano i tessuti preferiti e negli anni ’70 era molto usato il poliestere. Oggi i quiltmaker usano tutti i tipi di tessuto, ma principalmente i cotoni.

Volckening6

Foto 6 – GiantDahlia, cotone, c. 1935, Stati Uniti.”The GiantDahlia” è uno dei tanti grandi modelli di quilt medaglione progettati da Hubert ver Mehren di DesMoines, Iowa. Un produttore sconosciuto ha realizzato questa trapunta seguendo da vicino il modello.

Puoi parlarci dei quilt della tua collezione? Ce n’è uno a cui sei particolarmente legato e di cui ci vorresti raccontare la storia?

I Quiltmakers usano ciò che è disponibile, ma nelle varie epoche ci sono stati alcuni materiali più popolari e usati di altri.Una buona parte dei primi quiltcucini in America eradi lana e lino. Altri erano di cotone e il cotone è stato il tessuto più popolare nelle trapunte americane. Nel periodo vittoriano, la seta, il raso e il velluto erano i tessuti preferiti e negli anni ’70 era molto usato il poliestere. Oggi i quiltmaker usano tutti i tipi di tessuto, ma principalmente i cotoni.
Foto 6 – GiantDahlia, cotone, c. 1935, Stati Uniti.”The GiantDahlia” è uno dei tanti grandi modelli di quilt medaglione progettati da Hubert ver Mehren di DesMoines, Iowa. Un produttore sconosciuto ha realizzato questa trapunta seguendo da vicino il modello.

Ho trascorso molti anni a collezionare e ricercare il modello che oggi chiamiamo New York Beauty, e le informazioni sono state incluse nel mio primo libro, “New York Beauty, Quilts from the Volckening Collection”. Oggi preferisco concentrarmi maggiormente su come e quando le denominazioni dei pattern dei quilt hanno iniziato a far parte della tradizione.

Ho trascorso molti anni a collezionare e ricercare il modello che oggi chiamiamo New York Beauty, e le informazioni sono state incluse nel mio primo libro, “New York Beauty, Quilts from the Volckening Collection”. Oggi preferisco concentrarmi maggiormente su come e quando le denominazioni dei pattern dei quilt hanno iniziato a far parte della tradizione.

Tra la metà e la fine dell’Ottocento, c’erano riviste come Godey’sLady’s Book, che presentavano alcuni patternsma non davano nomi ai modelli.

Tra la metà e la fine dell’Ottocento, c’erano riviste come Godey’sLady’s Book, che presentavano alcuni patternsma non davano nomi ai modelli.

Le pubblicazioni successive, a partire dalla fine del XIX sec. (1890 e dopo) includevano invece i nomi dei modelli. Tali nomi a volte erano basati sulla tradizione, ma spesso rispondevano più a esigenze di marketing.

Le pubblicazioni successive, a partire dalla fine del XIX sec. (1890 e dopo) includevano invece i nomi dei modelli. Tali nomi a volte erano basati sulla tradizione, ma spesso rispondevano più a esigenze di marketing.

L’Encyclopedia of PiecedQuilt Pattern di Barbara Brackman include riferimenti a ciascun modello. Invito gli storici a fare attenzione a questi riferimenti, anche se  spessovengono ignorati. I riferimenti sono fondamentali per comprendere in che modo la denominazione di un pattern sia diventata parte integrante della tradizione americana. Il nome del modello, a volte racconta  il contesto storico e l’evoluzione di usi e costumi dell’epoca in cui la trapunta è stata realizzata.

Volckening7

Foto 7 –Piecedquilt, c. 1870, Virginia.

Nel tuo libro  “New York Beauty”, presenti la collezione di quilts raccolti in venti anni di ricerchee ti soffermi in modo particolare sullastoria delpattern da cui il libro prende il nome.

L’Encyclopedia of PiecedQuilt Pattern di Barbara Brackman include riferimenti a ciascun modello. Invito gli storici a fare attenzione a questi riferimenti, anche se  spessovengono ignorati. I riferimenti sono fondamentali per comprendere in che modo la denominazione di un pattern sia diventata parte integrante della tradizione americana. Il nome del modello, a volte racconta  il contesto storico e l’evoluzione di usi e costumi dell’epoca in cui la trapunta è stata realizzata.
Foto 7 –Piecedquilt, c. 1870, Virginia.

Ci puoi anticipare qualche cosa?

Il modello apparve per la prima volta nella metà del XIX secolo, quando i quiltmaker in America sperimentarono progetti complessi e geometrici. Alcuni degli esempi più antichi sono stati trovati negli Stati Uniti sudorientali, in luoghi come il Kentucky, il Tennessee e la Carolina del Nord e del Sud.

Il modello apparve per la prima volta nella metà del XIX secolo, quando i quiltmaker in America sperimentarono progetti complessi e geometrici. Alcuni degli esempi più antichi sono stati trovati negli Stati Uniti sudorientali, in luoghi come il Kentucky, il Tennessee e la Carolina del Nord e del Sud.

Alcuni storici non amano il nome “New York Beauty” e propongono altri nomi come nomi “originali”, ma non ci sono davvero prove a sostegno di tali affermazioni.

Alcuni storici non amano il nome “New York Beauty” e propongono altri nomi come nomi “originali”, ma non ci sono davvero prove a sostegno di tali affermazioni.

Il nome “New York Beauty” apparve per la prima volta in una pubblicazione nel 1930, quando Mountain Mistlo usò per uno dei suoi modelli di trapunta. Si affermava che quello fosse il vecchio nome del pattern, ma non era così. Il pattern era stato ispirato da una trapunta più vecchia, ora parte della Collezione Mountain Mist presso l’International Quilt Study Center and Museum. La persona che originariamente possedeva quella trapunta,  la chiamò “New York Beauty”, ma questo  non era  il suo nome ufficiale. Però,il nome NYB fu presto adottato dalle masse, e penso che ciò fosse dovuto al fatto che gli elementi di design erano legati a New York, alla Statua della Libertà e all’ornamento in stile Art Deco del Chrysler Building.

Il nome “New York Beauty” apparve per la prima volta in una pubblicazione nel 1930, quando Mountain Mistlo usò per uno dei suoi modelli di trapunta. Si affermava che quello fosse il vecchio nome del pattern, ma non era così. Il pattern era stato ispirato da una trapunta più vecchia, ora parte della Collezione Mountain Mist presso l’International Quilt Study Center and Museum. La persona che originariamente possedeva quella trapunta,  la chiamò “New York Beauty”, ma questo  non era  il suo nome ufficiale. Però,il nome NYB fu presto adottato dalle masse, e penso che ciò fosse dovuto al fatto che gli elementi di design erano legati a New York, alla Statua della Libertà e all’ornamento in stile Art Deco del Chrysler Building.

Nella tua collezione ci sono molte trapunte degli anni ’70. Non tutti riconoscono il valore culturale dei quilts cuciti in quegli anni, spesso in poliestere e non in cotone.  Ci puoi spiegare le motivazioni della tua scelta?

Ero bambino negli anni ’70.Per qualche motivo, i quiltsdi quegli anni mi ricordano la mia infanzia, anche se nella mia famiglia non era tradizione cucire trapunte.

Ero bambino negli anni ’70.Per qualche motivo, i quiltsdi quegli anni mi ricordano la mia infanzia, anche se nella mia famiglia non era tradizione cucire trapunte.

In quell’ epoca l’America ha sperimentato un significativo revival del quilting. La celebrazione del Bicentenario del 1976 ha dato a molte persone una ragione per esplorare il mondo del quilt e ha contribuito a creare un nuovo interesse per questo settore, così milioni di americani, in quegli anni, hanno cominciato a cucire trapunte per la prima volta.

In quell’ epoca l’America ha sperimentato un significativo revival del quilting. La celebrazione del Bicentenario del 1976 ha dato a molte persone una ragione per esplorare il mondo del quilt e ha contribuito a creare un nuovo interesse per questo settore, così milioni di americani, in quegli anni, hanno cominciato a cucire trapunte per la prima volta.

 Quando ho iniziato a studiare la storia della trapunta in America, ho trovato spesso riferimenti storici al grande revival americano degli anni ’70, ma nessuno sembrava avere una collezione di piumini di quell’ epoca. Il periodo è stato tra i più importanti nel quiltmaking perché ha visto rinascere il settore dell’’industria tessile americana, che oggi è fiorente, anzi multimiliardario.

 Quando ho iniziato a studiare la storia della trapunta in America, ho trovato spesso riferimenti storici al grande revival americano degli anni ’70, ma nessuno sembrava avere una collezione di piumini di quell’ epoca. Il periodo è stato tra i più importanti nel quiltmaking perché ha visto rinascere il settore dell’’industria tessile americana, che oggi è fiorente, anzi multimiliardario.

Per quanto riguarda il poliestere, bisogna pensare che è un materiale interessante per molte ragioni, soprattutto in termini di qualità puramente visive, poichè resiste allo sbiadimento, e i colori rimangono eccezionalmente vivaci. Quando ci troviamo ad osservare i quilts in poliestere degli anni ’70, non abbiamo dubbi nell’ individuare quali fossero i colori originali, dato che le stoffe usate non mostrano i classici segni di invecchiamento. Negli anni ’70, quando ho iniziato a collezionare quilts, ero uno dei pochi a esercitare questa attività e le trapunte erano economiche e  più facilmente reperibili. Ne ho acquistate molte per $ 50 o meno e a volte sono riuscito anche ad averle gratuitamente. Ho visto la bellezza in quilts che alla maggior parte del pubblico non interessavano, ma finalmente adesso il loro valore inizia ad essere riconosciuto ovunque.

Volckening8

Foto 8 -Tile Blocks, c. 1975, Louisiana. Questo è un quilt di dimensioni decisamente grandi, impreziosito da un decoro nero a zig-zag cucito lungo perimetro di ogni riquadro del puzzle .

La tua ricca collezione è protagonista di molte esposizioni negli Stati Uniti.  Quali sono i quilts che hanno riscosso più successo presso il pubblico?

Per quanto riguarda il poliestere, bisogna pensare che è un materiale interessante per molte ragioni, soprattutto in termini di qualità puramente visive, poichè resiste allo sbiadimento, e i colori rimangono eccezionalmente vivaci. Quando ci troviamo ad osservare i quilts in poliestere degli anni ’70, non abbiamo dubbi nell’ individuare quali fossero i colori originali, dato che le stoffe usate non mostrano i classici segni di invecchiamento. Negli anni ’70, quando ho iniziato a collezionare quilts, ero uno dei pochi a esercitare questa attività e le trapunte erano economiche e  più facilmente reperibili. Ne ho acquistate molte per $ 50 o meno e a volte sono riuscito anche ad averle gratuitamente. Ho visto la bellezza in quilts che alla maggior parte del pubblico non interessavano, ma finalmente adesso il loro valore inizia ad essere riconosciuto ovunque.
Foto 8 -Tile Blocks, c. 1975, Louisiana. Questo è un quilt di dimensioni decisamente grandi, impreziosito da un decoro nero a zig-zag cucito lungo perimetro di ogni riquadro del puzzle .

Ogni gruppo di quilts si rivolge ad un proprio pubblico ed ogni collezione ha viaggiato in luoghi diversi.I New York Beauty sono stati il soggetto del mio primo libro, pubblicato da Quiltmania nel 2015. Quell’anno, 50 delle trapunte del libro vennero esposte al Salon Pour l’Amourdu Fil di Nantes, Francia.

Ogni gruppo di quilts si rivolge ad un proprio pubblico ed ogni collezione ha viaggiato in luoghi diversi.I New York Beauty sono stati il soggetto del mio primo libro, pubblicato da Quiltmania nel 2015. Quell’anno, 50 delle trapunte del libro vennero esposte al Salon Pour l’Amourdu Fil di Nantes, Francia.

Nello stesso anno, si svolsero anche mostre dei miei quilts degli anni ’70 al QuiltCon di Austin, in Texas e al Benton County Museum qui in Oregon.

Nello stesso anno, si svolsero anche mostre dei miei quilts degli anni ’70 al QuiltCon di Austin, in Texas e al Benton County Museum qui in Oregon.

 Nel 2017, un gruppo selezionato ditrapunte in poliestere degli anni ’70 è apparso in una mostra all’International Quilt Study Centre & Museum di Lincoln, nel Nebraska.

 Nel 2017, un gruppo selezionato ditrapunte in poliestere degli anni ’70 è apparso in una mostra all’International Quilt Study Centre & Museum di Lincoln, nel Nebraska.

Attualmente sto lavorando a una collezione di Hawaiianquilt cuciti con ritagli di stoffe. Infatti sto scoprendo una tradizione, ancora non documentata, di patchwork realizzato con scarti di stoffe dell’industria dell’abbigliamento hawaiano della seconda metà del XX secolo. Sarà una vera rivelazione per gli amanti delle trapunte, specialmente per le persone che hanno familiarità con le trapunte in applique tradizionali hawaiani.

Attualmente sto lavorando a una collezione di Hawaiianquilt cuciti con ritagli di stoffe. Infatti sto scoprendo una tradizione, ancora non documentata, di patchwork realizzato con scarti di stoffe dell’industria dell’abbigliamento hawaiano della seconda metà del XX secolo. Sarà una vera rivelazione per gli amanti delle trapunte, specialmente per le persone che hanno familiarità con le trapunte in applique tradizionali hawaiani.

 Adoro esporre la mia collezione in Musei e spazi pubblici. Ma poiché desidero che quante più persone possibile possano vedere i quilt della tradizione, ne condivido le foto tutte le volte che posso attraverso facebook, il mio blog e riviste di settore.

Volckening9

Foto 9 -1970 Piatto di Dresda, un bell’esempio di colori sgargianti tipicidelle trapunte degli anni ’70.

Volckening10

Foto 10–HawaiianQuilt realizzato con avanzi di stoffe degli anni ’70.

Bill, ricordiamo però che oltre ad essere un collezionista sei anche un artista! Raccontaci dei tuoi quilts , da dove trai ispirazione e cosa ti  piace fare.

 Adoro esporre la mia collezione in Musei e spazi pubblici. Ma poiché desidero che quante più persone possibile possano vedere i quilt della tradizione, ne condivido le foto tutte le volte che posso attraverso facebook, il mio blog e riviste di settore.
Foto 9 -1970 Piatto di Dresda, un bell’esempio di colori sgargianti tipicidelle trapunte degli anni ’70.
Foto 10–HawaiianQuilt realizzato con avanzi di stoffe degli anni ’70.

Prima di diventare un collezionista, ho frequentato la Scuola d’Arte e ho iniziato a fare il fotografo. Mi è sempre piaciuto esprimermi in maniera creativa e il quiltmaking è uno dei tanti modi. Ho realizzato circa dieci trapunte, ma direi che non sono molto bravo a cucire. Mi piace pensare alla storia del quilt mentre lo progetto, soprattutto perché voglio che il lavoro sia qualcosa di nuovo e diverso e desidero che riveli il mio punto di vista in quanto artista. Anche se non cucio spesso, uso molto la fotografia. Scatto personalmente tutte le fotografie dei quilts della mia collezione, incluso lo shooting e il fotoritocco di Photoshop. Essere in grado realizzare un lavoro fotografico professionale, mi aiuta anche a  condividere la collezione con un vasto pubblico.

Volckening11

Foto 11 – “Wild Eyed Susans” (2014) di Bill Volckening. Questa trapunta di lana è stata realizzata con pezzi riadattati di una trapunta vintage  e con aggiunta di abbellimenti.

Volckening12

Foto 12 – “Fruity Beauty” (2015) di Bill Volckening, trapuntato da Jolene Knight. Questa trapunta è stata realizzata con tessuti Spoonflower stampati digitalmente da Bill Volckening.

Per concludere, speriamo di avere presto il piacere di poter ospitare la tua collezione anche qui in Italia. Sarebbe un’esperienza interessante e una grande occasione per poter ammirare da vicino lavori che costituiscono un importante pezzo della storia e della cultura dell’Arte Tessile.

Prima di diventare un collezionista, ho frequentato la Scuola d’Arte e ho iniziato a fare il fotografo. Mi è sempre piaciuto esprimermi in maniera creativa e il quiltmaking è uno dei tanti modi. Ho realizzato circa dieci trapunte, ma direi che non sono molto bravo a cucire. Mi piace pensare alla storia del quilt mentre lo progetto, soprattutto perché voglio che il lavoro sia qualcosa di nuovo e diverso e desidero che riveli il mio punto di vista in quanto artista. Anche se non cucio spesso, uso molto la fotografia. Scatto personalmente tutte le fotografie dei quilts della mia collezione, incluso lo shooting e il fotoritocco di Photoshop. Essere in grado realizzare un lavoro fotografico professionale, mi aiuta anche a  condividere la collezione con un vasto pubblico.
Foto 11 – “Wild Eyed Susans” (2014) di Bill Volckening.
Questa trapunta di lana è stata realizzata con pezzi riadattati di una trapunta vintage  e con aggiunta di abbellimenti.
Foto 12 – “Fruity Beauty” (2015) di Bill Volckening, trapuntato da Jolene Knight.
Questa trapunta è stata realizzata con tessuti Spoonflower stampati digitalmente da Bill Volckening.

Grazie!

handyhulle dmcheck out your urlchrono24 fake watches

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.