Interview

KAIT JAMES

*Foto in evidenza: The KLF (Koorie Liberation Front), 2023, Melbourne Now. Ph. credit and copyright Kait James

Kait James is a visual artist currently living and working in Melbourne, Australia. James belongs to the Wadawurrung community, one of Australia’s many indigenous peoples. Indigenous cultural identity is the starting point for a deep reflection that engages the artist in exploring political and social issues related to the protection, respect and sharing of Wadawurrung traditional cultural heritage.

Starting with old salvaged dishcloths, through embroidery, the use of bright colors and images from popular culture, James subverts stereotypical colonial narratives, using art to create awareness and encourage a change of perspective.

Notable accolades to his work include the Craft Victoria Emerging Artist Award for “Stolenwealth Games 2019,” the Lendlease Reconciliation Art Award – Koorie Art Show for ‘Hungry for Land 2019,” and the Churchies Emerging Artist Awards & Exhibition – Institute of Modern Art Brisbane.

There are numerous projects the artist is currently working on that will bring her work to be widely exhibited in the current year.

www.kaitjames.com

Let's Dance, 2019, photo credit and copyright Kait James

How did you approach art and what was the path that contributed to your artistic formation?

I’ve always loved making things and spent most of my childhood drawing. I studied a Diploma of Visual Arts and went on to complete a Bachelor of Media Arts/Photography at RMIT University in 2001. This was a transitional period in Photography and I realized Digital Photography was not the medium for me.

I returned to making art in 2018 through my love of culture, one of my beautiful cousins taught me traditional weaving with native grasses, this opportunity gave me confidence to start making art again. I took these skills and started weaving using coloured yarns giving it a contemporary feel.

I was on holiday in Queensland where I purchased some vintage souvenir tea towels and a punch needle at a secondhand shop, as well as some embroidery cotton, and yarn that I hoped to use in my weaving. I wanted to start using the punch needle immediately but didn’t have any material on hand so I used the vintage tea towels. I instinctually added indigenous references and scenes to the tea towels using the yarn.

I tracked down some Aboriginal calendar tea towels online, these were made in the 70s and 80s by non-indigenous people using stolen imagery of shields, spears etc. The imagery is very generalized and stereotypical, something I couldn’t relate to as an Indigenous person growing up in an urban area. I started embroidering them to change the narrative and give them a new life.

I was only making these tea towel works for myself and friends but after receiving positive feedback, I applied and was granted an exhibition at the Koorie Heritage trust in Melbourne. This first solo exhibition titled ‘Dry your dishes on my culture’ was the first major step in becoming a full-time artist.

143849

What is your main source of inspiration and what are the themes that your artistic research focuses on? When and why did your interest in embroidery and the textile medium more generally arise?

I’ve always loved textiles, in particular the use of colour. I’m not professionally trained in textiles but I started watching a lot of embroidery videos online, as well as punch needling and was fascinated with how they used colour, different yarns and fibres to make images. I think it was a natural progression for me using coloured yarn in weaving to embroidery and punch needling that I do today.

My indigenous culture is the main source of inspiration and themes that I use in my work; racism, land rights, Treaty and displacement are just a few of the themes I’ve explored.

There is a general lack of knowledge of indigenous history in Australia, and throughout the world for that matter. To highlight these issues, I use familiar pop culture references from the past as well as present day. I also use a lot of humour in my work, I find that it acts as a shield but also disarms the viewer.

First Nation, 2019, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James

You are a Wadawurrung woman and an artist, two aspects that interpenetrate and nourish each other. How does art allow you to support and help protect the Aboriginal cultural heritage of the Wadawurrung community?

There are over 500 different Indigenous nations in Australia, each with their own language and customs. Wadawurrung Country is located in Victoria, starts at the Werribee River just outside Melbourne, stretches down the coast and includes the large towns of Ballarat and Geelong.

I’m very proud Wadawurrung woman and feel fortunate that I can immerse myself in my culture on a daily basis as well as explore and share it with others. Since colonisation, the previous generations had to hide who they were, we were forbidden to practice culture, to speak language. Fortunately, my cousins and family have worked hard to reclaim our culture, reclaim language and once again be proud of who we are.

I’m very protective of our stories and I don’t use traditional stories in my work very often. I’m a fairly shy person but I use my art as a voice to hopefully educate, create awareness and change perspectives.

I never thought I would be lucky enough to do what I love every day. I do what I do for the future generations, hoping their journey will be an easier ride than the generations before me.

Language has been murdered, 2021, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
I Would Do Anything For Culture But I Wont Dot That, 2022, ph. credit Neon Parc, copyright Kait Lames

Tell us about the works displayed in the exhibition Hang us out to dry. How did the project for this exhibition come about?

‘Hang us out to dry’ was an exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ballarat in 2021 and featured 22 tea towel works with various themes from colonisation, treaty and the commercialisation of my culture.

This was an amazing opportunity for me, not only because it was held at one of the major galleries in Victoria but also because the gallery is located on Wadawurrung country.

As it was during the pandemic it was rather nerve-racking time, wondering whether the exhibition would actually be open given the number of lockdowns we were having in Melbourne, Victoria. I was very fortunate that the exhibition was open to the public for 4 of the 8 weeks it was due to be open. I know a lot of other artists who also had exhibitions that year that no one got to see or experience.

The exhibition also included my contemporary interpretation of a traditional emu feather skirts which I made from Fluro cord, souvenir teaspoons and emu feathers.

Life's pretty shitty without a treaty, 2019, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
Baa ni ip Bunyip, 2021, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
I am a man, 2021, photo credit and copyright Kait James
Yas Queenie, 2020, photo credit Andrew Curtis, copyright Kait James

What kind of routine do you have when you start a new project/work? What is a typical day like in your studio?

It really depends on the project I’m working on. Most of the time, an idea will come to me, usually because something that makes me mad or angry. I have a very long list of ideas for future tea towels works! I’ll mock up the work on the computer, I use a lot of text in my work so I love looking at different fonts. Play around with colour combinations and imagery etc.

Up until a few months ago, I made all my work from home. Either in my spare room or just on the couch. Although it was comfortable working from home, it wasn’t good for me as I would start working as soon as I woke up and would work right up until I went to bed. I now have an amazing studio about 10 minutes from home, I love being able to work during the day but come home to relax rather than being surrounded by work 24 hours a day. It is a much better balance and far less stressful.

I often go from one project straight into another so I really need to make an effort to have balance. I try and stay on top of admin and emails in the morning before heading to the studio, there are fewer distractions in the studio, I seem to get a lot more work done and come home at a reasonable time.

Annus Horribilis, 2020, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
Lucky Country, 2021, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James

Today, social networks provide a possibility of continuous connection with a very large audience. As a emerging artist, how do you live your relationship with the web? 

Social media does make it much easier to reach a large audience and be seen by Galleries and Curators. I know established artists my age, who used to visit Galleries to speak to Curators about their work and literally sell themselves in person, I can’t imagine having the time to do this and make work.

I do love following other artists and seeing the amazing work they are doing. Social media doesn’t come naturally to me, I do have to make a special effort to post my work but I am trying to improve and share my work more often.

13 Let me breathe, 2020, ph. credit Andrew Curtis, copyright Kait James

Are there any contemporary artists that you feel are close to your research and language?

There are so many contemporary artists that I admire, way too many to name. I was recently in an Indigenous exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria and my work was installed between Destiny Deacon and Kaylene Whiskey; two strong and fierce Indigenous artists who I greatly admire. Never in my wildest dreams did I think my art would end up anywhere near their phenomenal work – it was such an amazing honour and something I will cherish forever.

Alienation, 2021, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
Colonial Lanes, 2021, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James

What are you working on at this time?

I’ve just finished a large commission for NGV’s (National Gallery of Victoria) ‘Melbourne Now’ exhibition which is held every 10 years and features 200 artists from Victoria. This work is called The KLF (Koorie Liberation Front) and is the largest textile work I’ve made, 3 panels 1.4m x 1.6m each and includes fabric collage, embroidery and tufting. Melbourne Now opened last week and will be on show until August 2023.

I’ve just started working on a piece for the Tamworth Textile Triennial which opens in September and will tour Australian galleries for 3 years. Being a part of this Triennial is something I’ve wanted to do since I started working in Textiles, it is very exciting and reaches such a broad audience.

There are quite a few other exhibitions coming up in Sydney, Hobart and Melbourne this year. I’m also working on a few public art projects, most of which I’m unable to talk about at this time.

Interviste

KAIT JAMES

*Foto in evidenza: The KLF (Koorie Liberation Front), 2023, Melbourne Now. Ph. credit and copyright Kait James

Kait James è una artista visuale che attualmente vive e lavora a Melbourne, Australia. James appartiene alla comunità Wadawurrung, una delle numerose popolazioni autoctone del territorio australiano. L’identità culturale indigena costituisce il punto di partenza di una profonda riflessione che coinvolge l’artista nell’esplorazione di temi politici e sociali legati alla tutela, al rispetto e alla condivisione del patrimonio culturale tradizionale Wadawurrung.

Partendo da vecchi canovacci di recupero, attraverso il ricamo, l’uso di colori vivaci e immagini della cultura popolare, James sovverte le stereotipate narrazioni coloniali, usando l’arte per creare consapevolezza e incoraggiare un cambio di prospettiva.

Importanti sono i riconoscimenti al suo lavoro, tra cui il Craft Victoria Emerging Artist Award for “Stolenwealth Games 2019”, il Lendlease Reconciliation Art Award – Koorie Art Show for ‘Hungry for Land 2019” e il Churchies Emerging Artist Awards & Exhibition – Institute of Modern Art Brisbane.

Numerosi sono i progetti a cui l’artista si sta dedicando e che porteranno il suo lavoro ad essere ampiamente esposto nell’anno in corso.

www.kaitjames.com

Let's Dance, 2019, photo credit and copyright Kait James

Come ti sei avvicinata all’arte e qual è stato il percorso che ha contribuito alla tua formazione artistica?

Ho sempre amato creare cose e ho trascorso gran parte della mia infanzia a disegnare. Ho conseguito il Diploma di Arti Visive e poi il Bachelor of Media Arts/Photography alla RMIT University nel 2001. Questo è stato un periodo di transizione nella fotografia e ho compreso che la fotografia digitale non era il mezzo che faceva per me.

Sono tornata a fare arte nel 2018 grazie al mio amore per la cultura, una delle mie meravigliose cugine mi ha insegnato la tessitura tradizionale con le erbe autoctone, un’opportunità che mi ha dato la sicurezza per ricominciare a fare arte. Ho sfruttato queste conoscenze e ho iniziato a tessere utilizzando filati colorati per conferire un’impronta contemporanea.

Durante una vacanza nel Queensland ho acquistato in un negozio di seconda mano alcuni strofinacci vintage e un ago da punzone, oltre a del cotone da ricamo e a del filato che speravo di utilizzare per la mia tessitura. Volevo iniziare subito a usare l’ago da punzone, ma non avevo materiale a portata di mano, così ho usato gli strofinacci vintage. D’istinto ho aggiunto riferimenti e scene indigene agli strofinacci usando il filato.

Ho rintracciato online alcuni strofinacci del calendario aborigeno, realizzati negli anni ’70 e ’80 da persone non indigene con immagini rubate di scudi, lance ecc. Le immagini sono molto generiche e stereotipate, qualcosa con cui non potevo relazionarmi in quanto indigena cresciuta in un’area urbana. Ho iniziato a ricamarli per cambiare la narrazione e dare loro una nuova vita.

Realizzavo questi strofinacci solo per me e per gli amici, ma dopo aver ricevuto un riscontro positivo, ho fatto domanda e mi è stata accordata una mostra presso il Koorie Heritage trust di Melbourne. Questa prima mostra personale, intitolata “Dry your dishes on my culture”, è stato il primo grande passo per diventare un’artista a tutti gli effetti.

Advance Australia Not Fair, 2019, photo courtesy of NGV RGB, copyright Kait James

Quale è la tua principale fonte di ispirazione e quali sono i temi su cui si concentra la tua ricerca artistica? Quando e perché è nato l’interesse per il ricamo e più in generale per il mezzo tessile?

Ho sempre amato i tessuti, in particolare l’uso del colore. Non ho una formazione professionale in campo tessile, ma ho iniziato a guardare molti video di ricamo online e di punch needling e sono rimasta affascinata per il modo in cui usavano il colore, i diversi filati e le fibre per creare immagini. Credo che l’uso di filati colorati nella tessitura sia stato per me una evoluzione naturale verso il ricamo e l’agugliatura a punzone che faccio oggi.

La mia cultura indigena è la principale fonte di ispirazione e i temi che utilizzo nel mio lavoro: razzismo, diritti della terra, trattato e sfollamento sono solo alcuni dei temi che ho esplorato.

In Australia, e in tutto il mondo, c’è una generale mancanza di conoscenza della storia indigena. Per evidenziare questi problemi, utilizzo riferimenti alla cultura pop del passato e del presente. Nel mio lavoro uso anche molto humour, perché trovo che agisca da scudo e disarmi lo spettatore.

First Nation, 2019, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James

Sei una donna Wadawurrung e un’artista, due aspetti che si compenetrano e si nutrono a vicenda. In quale modo l’arte ti permette di sostenere e contribuire a proteggere il patrimonio culturale aborigeno della comunità Wadawurrung?

In Australia ci sono oltre 500 diverse nazioni indigene, ognuna con la propria lingua e i propri costumi. Il Paese di Wadawurrung si trova nel Victoria, inizia dal fiume Werribee appena fuori Melbourne, si estende lungo la costa e comprende le grandi città di Ballarat e Geelong.

Sono molto orgogliosa di essere una donna Wadawurrung e mi ritengo fortunata di potermi immergere quotidianamente nella mia cultura e di poterla esplorare e condividere con gli altri. Fin dalla colonizzazione, le generazioni precedenti hanno dovuto nascondere la loro identità, ci è stato proibito di praticare la cultura e di parlare la lingua. Fortunatamente, i miei cugini e la mia famiglia hanno lavorato intensamente per recuperare la nostra cultura, la nostra lingua e per tornare a essere orgogliosi di ciò che siamo.

Sono molto protettiva nei confronti delle nostre storie e non uso spesso le storie tradizionali nel mio lavoro. Sono una persona piuttosto timida, ma uso la mia arte come voce per sperare di educare, creare consapevolezza e cambiare prospettiva.

Non avrei mai pensato di avere la fortuna di fare ciò che amo ogni giorno. Faccio quello che faccio per le generazioni future, sperando che il loro percorso sia più facile di quello delle generazioni che mi hanno preceduto.

Language has been murdered, 2021, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
I Would Do Anything For Culture But I Wont Dot That, 2022, ph. credit Neon Parc, copyright Kait Lames

Parlaci dei lavori esposti nella mostra Hang us out to dry. Come è nato il progetto di questa mostra?

Hang us out to dry” è stata una mostra allestita presso l’Art Gallery of Ballarat nel 2021 e presentava 22 opere di canovacci con vari temi, tra cui la colonizzazione, il trattato e la commercializzazione della mia cultura.

È stata un’opportunità straordinaria per me, non solo perché si è tenuta in una delle principali gallerie del Victoria, ma anche perché la galleria si trova nel paese di Wadawurrung.

Poiché si trattava di un periodo di pandemia, è stato piuttosto snervante chiedersi se la mostra sarebbe stata effettivamente aperta, visto il numero di chiusure che si registravano a Melbourne, Victoria. Sono stata molto fortunata che la mostra sia stata aperta al pubblico per 4 delle 8 settimane previste. Conosco molti altri artisti che hanno esposto quell’anno e che nessuno ha potuto vedere o sperimentare.

La mostra comprendeva anche la mia interpretazione contemporanea di una tradizionale gonna di piume di emu, che ho realizzato con corde di Fluro, cucchiaini da souvenir e piume di emu.

Life's pretty shitty without a treaty, 2019, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
Baa ni ip Bunyip, 2021, photo credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
I am a man, 2021, photo credit and copyright Kait James
Yas Queenie, 2020, photo credit Andrew Curtis, copyright Kait James

Che tipo di routine segui quando inizi un nuovo progetto/lavoro? Com’è una giornata tipica nel tuo studio?

Dipende molto dal progetto a cui sto lavorando. Il più delle volte mi viene un’idea, di solito a causa di qualcosa che mi fa arrabbiare. Ho una lista lunghissima di idee per i futuri lavori sui canovacci! Faccio una bozza del lavoro al computer, uso molto testo nei miei lavori, quindi mi piace guardare diversi tipi di carattere. Gioco con le combinazioni di colori, le immagini, ecc.

Fino a qualche mese fa, realizzavo tutti i miei lavori da casa. Nella mia stanza degli ospiti o semplicemente sul divano. Anche se era comodo lavorare da casa, non mi faceva bene perché iniziavo a lavorare appena sveglia e lavoravo fino a quando andavo a letto. Ora ho uno studio fantastico a circa 10 minuti da casa, mi piace poter lavorare durante il giorno ma tornare a casa per rilassarmi piuttosto che essere circondata dal lavoro 24 ore al giorno. È un equilibrio decisamente migliore e molto meno stressante.

Spesso passo da un progetto all’altro, quindi devo sforzarmi di avere equilibrio. Cerco di sbrigare le pratiche amministrative e le e-mail al mattino prima di andare in studio, così poi ho meno distrazioni, riesco a lavorare molto di più e torno a casa a un orario ragionevole.

Annus Horribilis, 2020, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
Lucky Country, 2021, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James

Oggi i social network offrono una possibilità di connessione continua con un pubblico molto vasto. Come artista emergente, come vivi il tuo rapporto con il web?

I social media rendono molto più facile raggiungere un vasto pubblico ed essere visti da gallerie e curatori. Conosco artisti affermati della mia età che erano soliti visitare le gallerie per parlare con i curatori del loro lavoro e vendersi letteralmente di persona, non riesco a immaginare di avere il tempo di farlo e di creare anche le mie opere.

Mi piace seguire altri artisti e scoprire il loro lavoro straordinario. I social media non mi vengono naturali, devo fare uno sforzo particolare per postare i miei lavori, ma sto cercando di migliorare e di condividere le mie opere più spesso.

13 Let me breathe, 2020, ph. credit Andrew Curtis, copyright Kait James

Ci sono artisti contemporanei che senti vicini alla tua ricerca e al tuo linguaggio?

Sono tantissimi gli artisti contemporanei che ammiro, troppi per essere citati. Di recente ho partecipato a una mostra indigena alla National Gallery of Victoria e il mio lavoro è stato installato tra Destiny Deacon e Kaylene Whiskey, due artiste indigene forti e agguerrite che ammiro molto. Non avrei mai pensato che la mia arte sarebbe finita vicino al loro fenomenale lavoro: è stato un onore incredibile e lo conserverò per sempre.

Alienation, 2021, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James
Colonial Lanes, 2021, ph. credit Christian Capurro, copyright Kait James

A quali progetti stai lavorando in questo periodo?

Ho appena terminato una grande commessa per la mostra “Melbourne Now” della NGV (National Gallery of Victoria), che si tiene ogni 10 anni e presenta 200 artisti del Victoria. Quest’opera si chiama The KLF (Koorie Liberation Front) ed è il lavoro tessile più grande che ho realizzato, 3 pannelli di 1,4 m x 1,6 m ciascuno e comprende collage di tessuti, ricamo e tufting. Melbourne Now è stata inaugurata la scorsa settimana e rimarrà in mostra fino ad agosto 2023.

Ho appena iniziato a lavorare a un’opera per la Tamworth Textile Triennial, che aprirà a settembre e girerà le gallerie australiane per tre anni. Partecipare a questa Triennale è qualcosa che desideravo fare da quando ho iniziato a lavorare nel settore tessile, è molto emozionante e raggiunge un pubblico molto vasto.

Quest’anno sono in programma altre mostre a Sydney, Hobart e Melbourne. Sto anche lavorando ad alcuni progetti di arte pubblica, di cui non posso parlare in questo momento.

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.