Interview

MARIA A. GUZMÁN CAPRON

*Featured photo: Maria A. Guzmán Capron, Te Llevo Dentro, detail, 2021, Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint, 59 x 29 in, Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles. Photo: Ed Mumford

Maria A. Guzmán Capron (b. 1981) received her MFA from California College of the Arts, San Francisco, CA in 2015 and her BFA from the University of Houston, TX in 2004.

Her works are a combination of colored textile that she sews by hand and shapes in bodily forms in a synthesis of figuration with abstraction.

Her research explores cultural hybridity and the assertive and competitive need of human beings in complex contemporary societies. Born in Italy to Colombian and Peruvian parents and later relocating to Texas as a teenager, the artist is familiar with this need to adapt to different cultures and countries.

Her multilayered textile works are a metaphor for the different identities that coexist within us, some that we repress and some that we exalt.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron has numerous solo exhibitions to her credit, including Shulamit Nazarian in Los Angeles, CA, Texas State Galleries in San Marcos, Roll Up Project in Oakland, CA and Guerrero Gallery in San Francisco, CA. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at NIAD Art Center in Richmond, CA, Buffalo Institute for Contemporary Art, Deli Gallery in Brooklyn, New York and Mana Contemporary in Chicago, among others.

We asked her to tell us more about her work in this exclusive interview for ArteMorbida.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron, Shulamit Nazarian

Your works are hybrids in which you use different mediums among which the textile one stands out. How did you come to this language that synthesizes different skills including traditional ones such as sewing?

I didn’t have any background in sewing, but as an undergrad studying painting, I would use hot-glue to attach fabric cutouts to shapes made from cardboard and plywood. It was so exciting to not know how to use a material and to invent my own way, but at the heart of my experimentation was an earnest love and attraction for fabric itself. Crafted objects like quilts, woven textile from Peru and clothing have been a major source of inspiration. This led me to buy a cheap sewing machine and continue to experiment, creating costumes, masks, and soft-sculptures, and over nearly two decades of working with fabric, I have developed my own process for making that is at the core of my art practice.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Temblor, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 34 x 36 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

What is identity and how much is this theme inspiration, form and content of your works?

Through a combination of paints and hand-sewn textiles, I join together an array of patterns and striking colors to fashion bodily forms. Merging figuration with abstraction, these works explore cultural hybridity, pride, and the competing desires to assimilate and to be seen. I was born in Milan, Italy to Colombian and Peruvian parents, and lived there until I was 14. Although I spent my childhood in the same place that I was born, I was viewed as an immigrant from the start. I later relocated to Colombia, which offered a new form of immigrant experience, and later I relocated a third time to Texas. I recognize the challenges of toggling between various cultures and geographies. My multilayered textile works emphasize that we consist of several identities, some that we repress and some that we exalt.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Te Quiero, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 43 x 24 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles Photo: Ed Mumford

 What is the conceptual value of choosing to use waste fabrics for your works?

My practice explores how fabric, with its close reference to clothing, is a marker of class, gender and cultural identity. I am attracted to the off-cut fabrics from discount and repurpose stores, centering materials that have been cut and rejected as excess and in that way centralizing that which society undervalues. I am invested in the friction of mistranslations—of failing to “dress the part” or having one’s pride in self-expression overcast by exoticization.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Te Llevo Dentro, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 59 x 29 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles Photo: Ed Mumford

Your artworks are very vividly colorful. What is color for you and what does it mean in the context of your works?

Clothing and the fabric it is made from carry signals and meanings. I know that some people think that a few bright colors make an outfit loud and exotic, but that is how my family dresses; with a vivid color palette and floral patterns similar to what you see in my work.

Exuberance in color is familiar and comforting to me, but I know it can feel brash to others. When I make my work I speak of that tension: I show you my taste, my personality and the stress of fitting it in a new space. As an immigrant, a person, I want to belong. I want to be part of my community, but not by giving up what I am; instead, I want to be part of creating space for more differences.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Sígueme, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 46 x 36 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles Photo: Ed Mumfordarian

Through multilayered materials, your works overcome the two-dimensionality becoming sculptures. How assertive and autobiographical is this act of physically occupying a space?

The process and the kind of work I make is something new. I made it up because I need it to. It is, as you called, a hybrid that does not easily fit in a box. It is, in part, painting, sculptures and craft, and I like for it to occupy all of those realms. It is my language and with it I want to signal to other in-between people that they belong.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Siempre (studio image), detail, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 40 x 62 in

Over the last two years, due to the pandemic and the resulting restrictions, we have become more and more virtual and, consequently, the body has become less and less a vehicle for real communication with the world. How did this period affect your research and your artistic practice?

This pandemic time has been so strange and full of change in how we relate to each other. When I was in full lock down at home only with my husband and daughter the world felt so tiny and intimate. I made work in the kitchen and it was small and I made several drawings. I am used to having my own studio and working big and messy. It was different but I enjoyed the change of pace for a time. When I first went back to the studio I immediately made a large piece that had so much energy. The hardest part and where I felt the most the lack of closeness was when I was teaching online. It is so hard to communicate and reach people without our bodies. I don’t think the body has become less of a vehicle for real communication. I think we are making due but we are longing for that real closeness.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Siempre (studio image), 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 40 x 62 in

What does it mean, in your experience, to be an artist today?

I remember seeing paintings in museums as a child and deciding I wanted to be an artist. I saw a way of communicating and reaching people. Those artworks reached me and I want to do the same. I tell the world who I am, and I am always changing. I want to show other people they can do the same.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Equis, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, acrylic and spray paint 55 x 51 in

What are your projects in the near future?

I am in a group exhibition opening in February at The Jewish Contemporary Museum. I am currently working on a solo exhibition for the Blaffer Museum in Houston, TX opening this summer, and in 2023 I am very excited to create a large-scale vibrant and immersive solo exhibition with my gallery, Shulamit Nazarian.

Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles
616 N La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036
www.shulamitnazarian.com

Interviste

MARIA A. GUZMÁN CAPRON

Foto in evidenza: Maria A. Guzmán Capron, Te Llevo Dentro, detail, 2021, Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint, 59 x 29 in, Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles. Photo: Ed Mumford

Maria A. Guzmán Capron (Milano, 1981) ha conseguito il MFA presso il California College of the Arts nel 2015 e il BFA presso l’Università di Houston nel 2004.

I suoi lavori sono combinazioni di tessuti colorati che cuce a mano e che modella nelle forme del corpo in una sintesi tra figurazione ed astrazione. La sua ricerca indaga gli aspetti ibridi dell’identità culturale e la necessità assertiva e competitiva degli esseri umani nell’ambito di società complesse come quelle contemporanee. Nata in Italia da genitori colombiani e peruviani, trasferitasi giovanissima in Texas, Maria Guzmán conosce bene questa necessità di adattamento a culture e paesi diversi. Le sue opere tessili multistrato sono metafora delle diverse identità che convivono in noi, alcune più represse, altre più esaltate.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron ha all’attivo numero personali tra cui la mostra alla Shulamit Nazarian a Los Angeles, CA, alle Texas State Galleries di San Marcos, al Roll Up Project di Oakland, CA e alla Guerrero Gallery di San Francisco, CA. I suoi lavori sono stati inclusi, tra le altre, in mostre collettive al NIAD Art Center di Richmond, CA, al Buffalo Institute for Contemporary Art, alla Deli Gallery a Brooklyn, New York e alla Mana Contemporary a Chicago.

Le abbiamo domandato di raccontarci di più sul suo lavoro in questa intervista esclusiva per ArteMorbida.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

I tuoi lavori sono ibridi in cui utilizzi diversi medium tra i quali spicca quello tessile. Come sei arrivata a questo linguaggio che sintetizza diverse abilità anche artigianali come il cucire?

Non avevo nessuna esperienza nel cucito, ma durante gli studi di pittura ero solita utilizzate la colla a caldo per attaccare ritagli di tessuto a delle sagome di cartone e compensato. Era esaltante non saper utilizzare un materiale e cercare di inventare un metodo mio personale, ma al centro di quella sperimentazione vi era una vera passione per i tessuti stessi. Oggetti artigianali come quilt, tessuti del Perù e abbigliamento hanno sempre rappresentato per me una fonte di ispirazione. Così decisi di acquistare una macchina da cucire economica e di continuare a sperimentare, creando costumi, maschere e sculture ‘morbide’ e dopo circa vent’anni di lavoro sul tessuto ho sviluppato un mio personale approccio alla fabbricazione, che è alla base della mia pratica artistica.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Temblor, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 34 x 36 in. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

Cos’è l’identità e quanto questo tema è ispirazione, forma e contenuto dei tuoi lavori?

Attraverso una combinazione di colori e tessuti cuciti a mano, unisco una grande varietà di disegni e tinte sorprendenti per creare forme corporee. Con la fusione di figurazione e astrazione, le opere esplorano l’ibridismo culturale, l’orgoglio culturale e il contrastante desiderio di assimilare e di essere viste.

Sono nata a Milano, in Italia, da genitori Colombiani e Peruviani, e ho vissuto lì fino ai 14 anni. Sebbene sia cresciuta nello stesso luogo in cui sono nata, sono sempre stata considerata un’immigrante. Mi sono poi trasferita in Colombia, un’esperienza che mi ha fatto vivere una nuova forma di immigrazione, e poi di nuovo mi sono trasferita in Texas. Riconosco le sfide di passare da una cultura all’altra e da una geografia all’altra. I miei lavori tessili multistrato intendono proprio sottolineare che siamo composti da diverse identità, alcune che reprimiamo e altre che esaltiamo.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Te Quiero, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 43 x 24 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles Photo: Ed Mumford

Qual è il valore concettuale della scelta di utilizzare tessuti di scarto per le tue opere?

La mia pratica artistica esplora come la stoffa, con il suo stretto collegamento agli abiti, è un simbolo di identità di genere, di classe e culturale. Sono attratta dagli scampoli di tessuto recuperati dai negozi di seconda mano e dai discount, dal raccogliere materiali che sono stati tagliati e scartati perché in eccesso e in questo modo portare al centro dell’attenzione ciò che la società sottovaluta. Mi sento stretta in una morsa di incomprensione, inadeguata nel recitare la parte che mi è stata assegnata e sento l’orgoglio nell’esprimere me stessa offuscato dall’esotizzazione.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Te Llevo Dentro, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 59 x 29 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles Photo: Ed Mumford

Le tue opere sono vivissimamente colorate. Cos’è il colore per te e che significato ha nell’ambito dei tuoi lavori?

Gli abiti e i tessuti portano con sé segni e significati. So che per molte persone qualche colore acceso rende un outfit esotico e chiassoso, ma è così che si veste la mia famiglia, proprio con quelle tinte forti e con i disegni floreali che caratterizzano le mie opere. L’esuberanza del colore mi dà un senso di sicurezza e di conforto, ma so che per alcuni può sembrare spavalderia. Le mie opere raccontano quella tensione: mostro il mio gusto estetico, la mia personalità e la difficoltà di esprimerlo in un nuovo spazio. Come immigrata, come persona, sento il bisogno di appartenere. Voglio far parte della mia comunità, ma senza rinunciare a quello che sono. Voglio fare la mia parte nel creare uno spazio che possa accogliere tutte le sfumature.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Sígueme, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 46 x 36 in Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles Photo: Ed Mumfordarian

Attraverso la sovrapposizione di materiali, le tue opere superano la bidimensionalità diventando sculture. Quanto è assertiva ed autobiografica questa urgenza di occupare fisicamente uno spazio?

Questo processo e il tipo di opera che creo sono un qualcosa di nuovo. L’ho inventato perché ne avevo bisogno. È proprio come lo hai definito tu, un ibrido che non è facilmente definibile. È in parte pittura, in parte scultura e in parte artigianato, e mi piace pensare che rientri in tutti questi ambiti. È il mio linguaggio e con esso voglio comunicare a tutte le persone che si sentono nel mezzo che anche loro hanno un posto al mondo.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Siempre (studio image), detail, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 40 x 62 in. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angelesand Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

Negli ultimi due anni a causa della pandemia e delle restrizioni che ne sono derivate siamo diventati sempre più virtuali e, di conseguenza, il corpo è diventato sempre meno veicolo di comunicazione reale con il mondo. Come ha influito questo periodo sulla tua ricerca e sulla tua pratica artistica?

Questo tempo passato in pandemia è stato particolare e pieno di cambiamenti nel modo in cui ci relazioniamo gli uni con gli altri. Nel pieno del lockdown, chiusa in casa con mio marito e mia figlia, percepivo il mondo come un luogo piccolo e intimo. Lavoravo in cucina, era piccola e facevo soprattutto disegni. Sono abituata al mio studio, uno spazio grande e disordinato. Era decisamente diverso ma per un po’ mi ha fatto piacere questo cambio di passo. Quando sono rientrata nel mio studio ho creato subito un’opera grande piena di energia. Il momento più difficile per me, e quello in cui ho sentito di più la mancanza di contatto, è stato quando ho insegnato a distanza. È così difficile comunicare e raggiungere le persone senza l’aiuto del corpo. Non credo che il corpo sia diventato in qualche modo meno importante per la comunicazione reale, penso piuttosto che stiamo facendo del nostro meglio ma che aneliamo a quella vicinanza che ci manca.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Siempre (studio image), 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, latex paint, spray paint and acrylic paint 40 x 62 in. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

Cosa significa, nella tua esperienza, essere un artista oggi?

Quando ero bambina guardavo i quadri nei musei e sognavo di diventare un’artista. Lo vedevo come una via di comunicazione e come un modo per arrivare alle persone. Quelle opere d’arte mi arrivavano e io voglio fare la stessa cosa. Dico al mondo chi sono e sono in continua evoluzione. Voglio dire agli altri che possono fare la stessa cosa.

Maria A. Guzmán Capron Equis, 2021 Fabric, thread, batting, acrylic and spray paint 55 x 51 in. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles

Quali sono i tuoi progetti nel prossimo futuro?

Farò parte di una mostra collettiva che aprirà a febbraio al Jewish Contemporary Museum. Attualmente sto lavorando per una mostra personale al Blaffer Museum di Houston, TX che aprirà quest’estate e nel 2023 terrò una mostra personale vibrante e coinvolgente con opere in larga scala con la mia galleria, Shulamit Nazarian. Questo mi rende molto felice.

Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles
616 N La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036
www.shulamitnazarian.com

Barbara Pavan

English version Sono nata a Monza nel 1969 ma cresciuta in provincia di Biella, terra di filati e tessuti. Mi sono occupata lungamente di arte contemporanea, dopo aver trasformato una passione in una professione. Ho curato mostre, progetti espositivi, manifestazioni culturali, cataloghi e blog tematici, collaborando con associazioni, gallerie, istituzioni pubbliche e private. Da qualche anno la mia attenzione è rivolta prevalentemente verso l’arte tessile e la fiber art, linguaggi contemporanei che assecondano un antico e mai sopito interesse per i tappeti ed i tessuti antichi. Su ARTEMORBIDA voglio raccontare la fiber art italiana, con interviste alle artiste ed agli artisti e recensioni degli eventi e delle mostre legate all’arte tessile sul territorio nazionale.