Interview

MARY GRISEY

*Featured photo: Cloth Dripping, handwoven & hand-dyed linen, rope, cheesecloth, rust, acid dye, black tea, black walnut, terra cotta and sound, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey


Mary Grisey, (born 1983) is a fiber artist based in Los Angeles, California, who graduated in 2006 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Marist College in Poughkeepsie, NY, then went on to obtain a BFA in Fiber and Material Studies from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a Master of Fine Arts degree from York University in Toronto, Canada.

Grisey’s large-scale installations explore the theme of metamorphosis, her work is about becoming, a process that encompasses both doing and undoing. The connection between the physical and the metaphysical is the guide, inspiration and foundation of her artistic and spiritual research and is fully expressed in her monumental textile architectures, intensely corporeal, emotional and evocative, works that look at the boundary between matter-essence, body-soul, immanence-transcendence.

https://marygrisey.com/home.html

Cloth Dripping-detail, handwoven & hand-dyed linen, rope, cheesecloth, rust, acid dye, black tea, black walnut, terra cotta and sound, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey

How and when did you get into textile art, especially weaving? What was your training path?

Growing up, my mother was a talented seamstress and kept herself busy constructing and sewing our family’s clothing. She had a room full of fabrics and yarns that I remember exploring at a young age. Because of this it felt only natural to move in the direction of textiles. Cloth has an incredible ability to tell stories, hold memory and history. We are born and swaddled in it, protected and kept warm in it, and buried in it. I believe textiles hold a particular energetic resonance that I am consistently interested in exploring in my art practice.

My training path began in 2004 at Marist College – a liberal arts school in upstate New York. During my two years there, I trained as a painter. I thought this would be my path, but eventually felt the flat surface and shape of the canvas was too limiting for what I wanted to express in my work. I wanted to create large-scale sculpture and installation where the viewer could be immersed within it and around it.

In 2007-2009 I received my BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in the Fiber and Material Studies program. This is where I learned how to weave on a jack floor loom and fell in love with this way of working. Weaving has a limitless, meditative quality about it – there are so many ways to explore this medium and I found it was the best way to express my concepts and ideas.

In 2012 I attended York University’s MFA program in Toronto and was selected as a full scholarship international student. The majority of my MFA thesis work was exploring off-loom weavings. I created heavy, large-scale rope weavings by hammering a series of nails directly into my studio wall using hand-dyed sisal rope for the warp and weft. This work was very physical and labor intensive, as it required my whole body to be a part of the process.

Cloth Dripping-back view, handwoven & hand-dyed linen, rope, cheesecloth, rust, acid dye, black tea, black walnut, terra cotta and sound, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey

Besides being a visual artist, you are a Multidimensional Channeler, Psychic and Spiritual Medium. How do these activities/experiences influence your artistic research and practice?

I don’t consider art and my spiritual practice as being totally separate. Everything I do is an expression of my experience in this world and how I can bring meaning to it. Like branches of a tree, everything I do is connected down to the roots. My spiritual practice is more of an act of service – to help others find their way and bring healing. My art practice is a way to come back to my Soul – a way to understand more of who I am. By bridging these two practices, I feel they naturally feed and give context to one another.

Cloth Dripping-back view, handwoven & hand-dyed linen, rope, cheesecloth, rust, acid dye, black tea, black walnut, terra cotta and sound, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey
Relic of the Moirai, sisal, hand-dyed cotton and wool, 2013. Photo Credit: Peter Legris, copyright Mary Grisey
In Essence // The Exalted Octave, handwoven linen, horsehair and indigo dye, 2019. Photo Credit: Mary Grisey, copyright Mary Grisey

What does “channeled art” consist of?

Channeled art is a specific modality within my practice that are commissioned pieces I create for clients based on the psychic visions and messages I receive for them. These works of art can function as a talisman for their soul’s evolution, empowerment, a protector of their sacred space or perhaps something special to remind them of how powerful they are. It is my belief that the process of art making is a channeled, intuitive journey where the artist moves into a liminal space somewhere between earth and higher dimensional planes.

The term “channeled art” traces back to the spiritualist movement during the late 1800s to early 1900s. The word “channeled” means to bring oneself into a heightened state of awareness where the mind moves simultaneously inward and the inner soul expands outward with the purpose of becoming one with the spiritual dimension. Channeled art is a modality to express the connection and bridge to the higher realms of consciousness. Historically, this was also called spirit art or automatism.

A Song For Remembering, handwoven linen, found seashells, found net/rope, rust (dye), rose petals (dye) and eucalyptus (dye). 2022, copyright Mary Grisey
Remember Me, handwoven linen, ramie, found beach stick, found vintage wooden and brass beads, cochineal (dye) and logwood (dye), 2021, copyright Mary Grisey
The Guide, handwoven linen, cotton, rose petals (dye), cochineal (dye), found fishing net, found beach stone and driftwood, 2022, copyright Mary Grisey
Within, handwoven linen, found leather, glass blown hoop, horsehair, driftwood, fishnet, seashell, unseen wool, rose petals (dye) and eucalyptus (dye), 2022, copyright Mary Grisey

You use a wide variety of materials from different sources and types to create your works. What is their value (symbolic, metaphorical…) and meaning within your artistic research and practice? 

One of my favorite things to do is to go to an antique market or out in nature and find objects that hold a certain type of energy that parallels a particular project I am working on. I love to incorporate these found objects within the handwoven structures of my work to enhance the energetic frequency within it. Working with a majority of natural materials is something I am drawn to – like a mirror to our humanity, our natural world. The materials I choose are often weathered by time or I am the one distressing the quality of it by dyeing the surface, burning it, cutting into it or burying it under the ground. The process and act of creating my work is often more important than the outcome.

Cradling: In Ruins, found barn wood, hand-dyed and burned sisal, 2014. Photo Credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey
Cradling: In Ruins-detail, found barn wood, hand-dyed and burned sisal, 2014. Photo Credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey

The Things That Were, the Things That Are, the Things That Ever Will Be. How did this work come about and what is its inspiration?

In the Spring of 2019 I received news that my mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer. Simultaneously I was also pregnant with my first daughter, Sofie. This work was directly inspired by the impending death of my mother and the birth of my daughter. In dreams and meditations, I had visions of angelic support which inspired the shape of the work to be floating in the space with wings. Perhaps my mother was this angelic, woven being and the visions that prophesied this work was to be manifested into tangible form after her death.

The Things That Were, the Things That Are, the Things That Ever Will Be, handwoven linen, horsehair and found rope, 2019. Photo Credit: International Linen Biennale, copyright Mary Grisey
The Things That Were, the Things That Are, the Things That Ever Will Be-detail, handwoven linen, horsehair and found rope, 2019. Photo Credit: International Linen Biennale, copyright Mary Grisey

A work or project that has played an important role in your artistic growth?

The work, Sung From the Mouth of Cumae, was an important turning point in my art practice. The installation’s title refers to Cumae, a Greek colony in Italy founded in the 8th century B.C.E. It was the site of one of the famed oracles of the ancient world, where the Cumean Sibyl, a priestess, was said to have sung prophecies from the mouth of a cave. At the time of creating this work, I experienced a spontaneous past life memory that corresponded to this historical site and happening. I incorporated sound into this installation work to create more of an immersive and emotional atmosphere that encapsulated this past life memory and triggered all of the senses: sight, smell, touch and sound. The sound was a collaboration of singing voices hidden within the ceramic vessel that echoed the prophecies sung by the oracle. The tall, figural weavings emulate a hovering presence of the spirit world, assisting the Sibyl as a medium to sing her songs. My aim was to create a space of the mystery and mysticism of the echoing ghostly voices while immersed within the hovering weavings that offered a spiritual value or meditative experience for the viewer. The cave at Cumae served as the physical point of connection to the spiritual realm; for the viewers in the gallery, the materiality of artwork is the bridge into the ephemeral, the mystery and emotional. Perhaps within the experience of this work, one could find their own truth and oracle within the liminal space.

Sung From the Mouth of Cumae, handwoven & hand-dyed linen and raffia, earthenware, sound. Dye is made from bleach and found rusty objects, 2015. Photo credit: Toni Hafkenscheid, copyright Mary Grisey
Sung From the Mouth of Cumae-detail, handwoven & hand-dyed linen and raffia, earthenware, sound. Dye is made from bleach and found rusty objects, 2015. Photo credit: Toni Hafkenscheid, copyright Mary Grisey
Sung From the Mouth of Cumae-detail, handwoven & hand-dyed linen and raffia, earthenware, sound. Dye is made from bleach and found rusty objects, 2015. Photo credit: Toni Hafkenscheid, copyright Mary Grisey

Are there any contemporary artists that you feel are close to your research and language?

Petah Coyne – For her use of organic materials that are based on the ephemerality of life and death.

Berlinde DeBruyckere – For her work in reference to the human body in abject form.

Guadalupe Maravilla – For the spiritual and interactive context of his sculptural work.

Diana Al-Hadid – For her use of storytelling and immersive installations based on historical references.

For Lethe, hand-dyed sisal, rusted steel and sound, 2014. Photo credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey

What are the most challenging aspects you deal with when creating a work?

Currently my biggest setback and challenge is creating the space and time to make art. I am a new mom with another child coming on the way and it has been really difficult to find the time and energy to be in the studio away from the chaos of family. My biggest respect goes out to mothers who are also artists. I will say that becoming a mother has been the most transformative and wildly radical thing I have ever done in my life and will surely give new meaning to my art practice.

For Lethe-dettaglio, sisal tinto a mano, acciaio arrugginito e suono, 2014. Photo credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey

Future projects?

I have multiple project ideas on the horizon. Some of these ideas include focus on the human body in relation to birth/life/death themes, more large-scale handwoven installations and most recently have been thinking about bringing oil painting back into my practice. I would also love to continue to create commissioned “channeled art” for those clients who seek it.

Interviste

MARY GRISEY

*Foto in evidenza: Cloth Dripping, lino tessuto a mano e tinto a mano, corda, garza, ruggine, colorante acido, tè nero, noce canaletto, terracotta e suono, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey


Mary Grisey, (classe 1983) fiber artist con sede a Los Angeles, California, si è laureata nel 2006 in Belle Arti presso il Marist College di Poughkeepsie, NY, ha poi proseguito i suoi studi ottenendo il BFA in Fiber and Material Studies, presso The School of the Art Institute di Chicago e un Master in Fine Arts alla York University di Toronto, Canada.

Le grandi installazioni di Grisey esplorano il tema della metamorfosi, del divenire inteso come continuo cambiamento che crea e distrugge. La connessione tra fisico e metafisico è la guida, l’ispirazione e il fondamento della sua ricerca artistica e spirituale e si ritrova compiutamente espressa nelle monumentali architetture tessili, intensamente corporee, emotive ed evocative, opere che si affacciano sul confine tra materia-essenza, corpo-anima, immanenza-trascendenza.
https://marygrisey.com/home.html

Cloth Dripping-detail, lino tessuto a mano e tinto a mano, corda, garza, ruggine, colorante acido, tè nero, noce canaletto, terracotta e suono, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey

Come e quando ti sei interessata all’arte tessile, in particolare alla tessitura? Qual è stato il suo percorso formativo?

Sono cresciuta osservando mia madre, abile sarta, che si teneva occupata creando e cucendo gli abiti per la famiglia. Aveva una stanza intera piena di stoffe e filati e mi piaceva esplorarla da bambina, per questo è stato quasi naturale approdare al tessile. La stoffa ha un’abilità unica nel raccontare, trattenere la memoria e la storia.

Appena nati veniamo avvolti nella stoffa, siamo protetti e tenuti al caldo in essa, e sepolti in essa. Nella mia pratica artistica mi interessa molto esplorare la particolare risonanza energetica propria dei tessuti.

Il mio percorso formativo è iniziato nel 2004 al Marist College, una scuola di arti liberali a nord di New York. Durante i due anni di studio, mi sono formata come pittrice. Pensavo che questa sarebbe stata la mia strada, ma alla fine sentivo che la superficie piatta e la forma della tela erano troppo limitanti per ciò che volevo esprimere nel mio lavoro. Volevo creare sculture e installazioni di grandi dimensioni in cui lo spettatore potesse immergersi completamente.

Dal 2007 al 2009 ho conseguito il Master presso la School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) nel programma Fiber and Material Studies. È qui che ho imparato a tessere su un telaio a levata da pavimento e mi sono innamorata di questo modo di lavorare. La tessitura ha una qualità meditativa infinita: i modi per esplorare questo medium sono tantissimi e ho scoperto che era il modo migliore per esprimere i concetti e le idee che mi appartengono.

Nel 2012 ho frequentato un Master della York University a Toronto e sono stata selezionata per una borsa di studio completa come studentessa internazionale. La maggior parte del mio lavoro di tesi per il Master riguardava l’esplorazione delle tessiture fuori telaio. Ho creato pesanti tessiture in corda su larga scala piantando una serie di chiodi direttamente nel muro del mio studio, utilizzando corda di sisal tinta a mano per l’ordito e la trama. Si trattava di un lavoro molto fisico e intensivo, di un processo che richiedeva la partecipazione di tutto il mio corpo.

Cloth Dripping-back view, lino tessuto a mano e tinto a mano, corda, garza, ruggine, colorante acido, tè nero, noce canaletto, terracotta e suono, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey

Oltre a essere un artista visiva, sei un Medium Multidimensionale, Psichico e Spirituale. In che modo queste attività/esperienze influenzano la tua ricerca e pratica artistica?

Non considero l’arte e la mia pratica spirituale come due entità distinte. Tutto ciò che faccio è espressione della mia esperienza al mondo e di come posso darle un significato. Come i rami di un albero, tutto ciò che faccio è collegato fino alle radici. La mia pratica spirituale è più un servizio alla comunità – un modo per aiutare gli altri a trovare la propria strada e a guarire. La mia pratica artistica invece è un modo per ricongiungermi con la mia anima – un modo per capire meglio chi sono. L’unire queste due pratiche vuol dire fare in modo che si nutrano l’un l’altra.

Cloth Dripping-back view, lino tessuto a mano e tinto a mano, corda, garza, ruggine, colorante acido, tè nero, noce canaletto, terracotta e suono, 2016. Photo Credit: Yuula Benivolski, copyright Mary Grisey
Relic of the Moirai, sisal, cotone e lana tinti a mano, 2013. Photo Credit: Peter Legris, copyright Mary Grisey
In Essence // The Exalted Octave, lino tessuto a mano, crine di cavallo e tintura indaco, 2019. Photo Credit: Mary Grisey, copyright Mary Grisey

Cosa intendi quando parli di “channeled art”?

Channeled art (l’arte canalizzata) è una particolarità della mia pratica: si tratta di pezzi su commissione che creo per i clienti basandomi su visioni e messaggi psichici che ricevo per loro. Queste opere possono essere dei talismani per una loro crescita interiore, per renderli più forti, per proteggere i loro spazi sacri o anche solo qualcosa di speciale per ricordare loro quanto sono forti. Credo che il processo artistico sia un viaggio canalizzato, intuitivo in cui l’artista si muove in uno spazio liminale fra il terreno e l’ultraterreno.

Il termine “arte canalizzata” rimanda al movimento spiritualista tra la fine del 1800 e l’inizio del 1900. Con “canalizzato” si intende il raggiungere uno stato di consapevolezza elevata in cui la mente si muove simultaneamente verso l’interno e l’anima interiore si espande verso l’esterno con lo scopo di diventare un tutt’uno con la dimensione spirituale. L’arte canalizzata è una modalità per esprimere la connessione e il ponte con gli stati più alti della coscienza. Storicamente è stata chiamata anche arte dello spirito o automatismo.

A Song For Remembering, lino tessuto a mano, conchiglie ritrovate, rete/ corda di recupero, ruggine (tintura), petali di rosa (tintura) ed eucalipto (tintura). 2022, copyright Mary Grisey
Remember Me, lino tessuto a mano, ramiè, bastoncino ritrovato in spiaggia, perline di legno e ottone vintage trovate, cocciniglia (tintura) e logwood (tintura), 2021, copyright Mary Grisey
The Guide, lino tessuto a mano, cotone, petali di rosa (tintura), cocciniglia (tintura), rete da pesca ritrovata, pietre ritrovate in spiaggia e legni di scarto, 2022, copyright Mary Grisey
Within, lino tessuto a mano, cuoio di recupero, cerchio in vetro soffiato, crine di cavallo, legno di deriva, rete, conchiglia, lana, petali di rosa (tintura) ed eucalipto (tintura), 2022, copyright Mary Grisey

Per realizzare le tue opere utilizzi un’ampia gamma di materiali di diversa provenienza e tipologia. Qual è il loro valore (simbolico, metaforico…) e significato all’interno della tua ricerca e pratica artistica?

Una delle cose che mi piace di più fare è andare in un mercato dell’antiquariato o in giro nella natura e trovare oggetti che hanno in sé un certo tipo di energia che si sposa con un particolare progetto a cui sto lavorando. Mi piace molto incorporare questi oggetti di recupero nelle strutture tessute a mano della mia opera per migliorarne la frequenza energetica. Mi sento attratta dall’uso di molti materiali presi dalla natura – è come uno specchio della nostra umanità, il nostro mondo naturale.

Lavorare per lo più con materiali naturali è qualcosa che mi attira, come uno specchio della nostra umanità e del nostro mondo naturale. I materiali che scelgo sono spesso soggetti alle intemperie del tempo o sono io a stravolgerne la qualità tingendone la superficie, bruciandoli, incidendoli o seppellendoli. Il processo e l’atto creativo del mio lavoro sono spesso più importanti del risultato.

Cradling: In Ruins, legno di fienile recuperato, sisal tinto e bruciato a mano, 2014. Photo Credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey
Cradling: In Ruins-detail, legno di fienile recuperato, sisal tinto e bruciato a mano, 2014. Photo Credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey

The Things That Were, the Things That Are, the Things That Ever Will Be. Come è nato questo lavoro e a cosa si ispira?

Nella primavera del 2019 ho ricevuto la notizia che a mia madre era stato diagnosticato un cancro terminale. A quel tempo ero incinta della mia prima figlia, Sofie. Questo lavoro è stato direttamente ispirato dall’imminente morte di mia madre e dalla nascita di mia figlia. Nei sogni e nelle meditazioni ho avuto visioni di un aiuto angelico che ha ispirato la forma dell’opera, che fluttua nello spazio con le ali. Forse mia madre era questo essere angelico e tessuto e le visioni profetizzavano che quest’opera si sarebbe manifestata in una forma tangibile solo dopo la sua morte.

The Things That Were, the Things That Are, the Things That Ever Will Be, lino tessuto a mano, crine di cavallo e corda di recupero, 2019. Photo Credit: International Linen Biennale, copyright Mary Grisey
The Things That Were, the Things That Are, the Things That Ever Will Be-detail, lino tessuto a mano, crine di cavallo e corda di recupero, 2019. Photo Credit: International Linen Biennale, copyright Mary Grisey

Un’opera o un progetto che ha svolto un ruolo essenziale nella tua crescita artistica?

L’opera Sung From the Mouth of Cumae, ha rappresentato un importante punto di svolta nella mia pratica artistica. Il titolo dell’installazione si riferisce a Cuma, una colonia greca in Italia fondata nell’VIII secolo a.C. Era il luogo di uno dei più famosi oracoli del mondo antico, si diceva che lì la Sibilla Cumana, una sacerdotessa, cantasse profezie dall’antro di una grotta. Al momento di creare quest’opera, ho vissuto un ricordo spontaneo di una vita passata che corrispondeva a questo luogo e a questo evento storico. Ho incorporato il suono in quest’opera installativa per creare un’atmosfera più coinvolgente ed emotiva che racchiudesse questo ricordo di vita passata e attivasse tutti i sensi: vista, olfatto, tatto e suono. Il suono era un insieme di voci che cantavano nascoste all’interno del vaso di ceramica, che a loro volta riecheggiavano le profezie cantate dall’oracolo. Le tessiture alte e figurate emulano una presenza aleggiante del mondo degli spiriti, che assiste la Sibilla come medium per cantare i suoi oracoli. Il mio obiettivo era quello di creare uno spazio di mistero e misticismo con l’eco delle voci spettrali, immerso nelle tessiture sospese, che offrisse un valore spirituale o un’esperienza meditativa per lo spettatore. La grotta di Cuma fungeva da punto di collegamento fisico con il regno spirituale; per gli spettatori della galleria, la materialità dell’opera d’arte è il ponte verso l’effimero, il mistero e l’emozione. Forse, nell’esperienza di quest’opera, si può trovare la propria verità e il proprio oracolo all’interno dello spazio liminale.

Sung From the Mouth of Cumae, lino e rafia tessuti e tinti a mano, terracotta, suono. La tintura è realizzata con candeggina e oggetti arrugginiti recuperati, 2015. Photo credit: Toni Hafkenscheid, copyright Mary Grisey
Sung From the Mouth of Cumae-dettaglio, lino e rafia tessuti e tinti a mano, terracotta, suono. La tintura è realizzata con candeggina e oggetti arrugginiti recuperati, 2015. Photo credit: Toni Hafkenscheid, copyright Mary Grisey
Sung From the Mouth of Cumae-dettaglio, lino e rafia tessuti e tinti a mano, terracotta, suono. La tintura è realizzata con candeggina e oggetti arrugginiti recuperati, 2015. Photo credit: Toni Hafkenscheid, copyright Mary Grisey

Ci sono artisti contemporanei che senti vicini alla tua ricerca e al tuo linguaggio?

Petah Coyne – per l’uso di materiali organici che si basano sulla fugacità della vita e della morte.

Berlinde DeBruyckere – Per il suo lavoro sul corpo umano in forma abietta.

Guadalupe Maravilla – Per il contesto spirituale e interattivo della sua opera scultorea.

Diana Al-Hadid – Per l’uso della narrazione e delle installazioni immersive basate su riferimenti storici.

For Lethe, sisal tinto a mano, acciaio arrugginito e suono, 2014. Photo credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey

Quali sono gli aspetti più impegnativi che ti trovi ad affrontare nel creare un’opera?

Attualmente il mio ostacolo e la mia sfida più grande sono trovare lo spazio e il tempo per fare arte. Sono una neomamma con un altro figlio in arrivo ed è stato davvero difficile trovare il tempo e l’energia per dedicarmi allo studio lontano dal caos familiare. Nutro moltissimo rispetto per le madri che sono anche artiste. Diventare madre è stata la cosa più trasformativa e selvaggiamente radicale che abbia mai fatto nella mia vita e sicuramente darà un nuovo significato alla mia pratica artistica.

For Lethe-dettaglio, sisal tinto a mano, acciaio arrugginito e suono, 2014. Photo credit: Thomas Blanchard, copyright Mary Grisey

Progetti futuri?

Ho diverse idee in mente. Alcune di queste idee includono l’attenzione al corpo umano in relazione ai temi della nascita/vita/morte, installazioni tessute a mano su più larga scala e, più recentemente, ho pensato di riportare la pittura a olio nella mia pratica. Mi piacerebbe anche continuare a creare “arte canalizzata” su commissione per i clienti che la desiderano.

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.