Interview

MICHAEL SYLVAN ROBINSON

*Featured photo: Front view of “Venus Rising: a Contemporary Invocation” by Michael Sylvan Robinson. Sculptural garment, textile collage with machine and hand-stitching, beading, hand-stenciled poetic text 28″ x 38″ x 2″ (2019) was exhibited by the Society for Embroidered Work during Rome Art Week 2021, and is currently exhibited in “Adorned: Inspired by Fabric and Fashion” at the Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center in Solomons, Maryland

In Michael Sylvan Robinson‘s practice, fine art, sculpture, fashion, street art and queer activism are all intertwined. The artist employs a multiplicity of techniques and materials, juxtaposing selected fabrics into layered collages refined with machine stitching, hand stitching and beading in an overabundance of details that leads the viewer into the work and its conceptual structure. A genderqueer fibre artist and educator, Robinson holds an MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts from Goddard College (2008) and a BA from Bennington College with an emphasis in dance and theatre. From his experience as a costume designer and performer, he has developed a research focus on fibre art, creating two-dimensional works, wearable sculptures and installations. He exhibits internationally in private galleries, institutional and museum venues – at Palazzo Velli for Rome Art Week, SPRING/BREAK Art Show, the National Queer Arts Festival in San Francisco and the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts.

Combining art and fashion, his work has been photographed for Vogue Germany; one of his pieces was commissioned and worn at the Met Gala in 2021 by theatre producer Jordan Roth, a collaboration he recounts in an interview with Vogue.

Back view of "Venus Rising: a Contemporary Invocation" by Michael Sylvan Robinson. Sculptural garment, textile collage with machine and hand-stitching, beading, hand-stenciled poetic text 28" x 38" x 2" (2019) was exhibited by the Society for Embroidered Work during Rome Art Week 2021, and is currently exhibited in "Adorned: Inspired by Fabric and Fashion" at the Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center in Solomons, Maryland

Genderqueer fiber artist, activist, art educator: can you tell me who is the artist Michael Sylvan Robinson and how his artistic practice talk about him? 

I’m addressed Sylvan, using my full name professionally and for listings, but just Sylvan when we’re in conversation together. I use they / he pronouns. I’ve known myself as genderqueer for most of my life, though there have been times I kept that understanding more hidden from outward expression, and now at midlife feel very inspired and renewed in my self-embodiment in this generational expansion of gender expression and identity.

My work in the world is really an intersection of art, activism, and arts education, and all three of those pathways twined together in my early formative years as a young queer person in New York City of the late 80’s and early 90’s. Initially, I was a costume designer, a performance artist, and drag performer, and those experiences provided a great foundation for my fiber art practice of today! During those early NYC years, I participated in Queer Nation and ACT UP meetings and actions as many of my friends were dying of AIDS complications; being of service, caring for others and community, anchored much of my development as a person. Today, I’m an active member of Gays Against Guns, a nonviolent direct action group trying to stop the epidemic of gun violence. I bring my art to that work, creating memorial garments that have been worn in actions and memorial vigils. I research those killed by gun violence, and I try to share what I can learn about each individual’s life so that they are honored and remembered by our activism.

Jordan Roth in Michael Sylvan Robinson

Where does your predilection for the textile medium come from – where and when did it begin?

One of the places I felt safest at college was the costume shop. As a young person I was very inspired by fashion and costumes, and as an 80’s teen there were so many gender noncomforming icons to be inspired by – Boy George, Annie Lennox, Prince – were some of the first music videos I remember seeing, and I wore makeup and deliberately genderfluid clothing during those years as I explored my creativity and personal identity. When I went back to earn an MFA at Goddard College, I turned my costume design and construction skills towards a more visual arts focused practice. I attended a professional development conference in Baltimore as part of my teaching work, and one of the presenters was the incredible Joyce J. Scott, she shared her interdisciplinary artistry and love of materials, including beadwork; I walked over to a local bead store right after the conference and came home with my first jars of brightly colored glass beads, which are an important component of my work to this day. I’m drawn to the decorative as a way of delighting the eye, but the beauty of my work is also an invitation to encounter the activist messaging or more challenging thematic projects that are part of my art-making.

Handwork is a major aspect of all my art-making; it is labor intensive, and sometimes I feel very much like a kind of faerie spider eagerly stitching away in bright colors and sparkling beads, and other times it feels very much like Rumplestiltskin spinning straw into gold with faster, tighter deadlines. My studio is in my home, and it helps me keep long-term projects moving even if I just get a little time in the studio when I get back from school.

Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson

Body, dress, identity: what do you think is the relationship between these elements and how are they declined in your works?

Often my work is about the absence of the body, creating sculptural garments that are memorial pieces, marking absences. My “Mourning Jacket for a Sweet Satyr: In Remembrance of Eric J. Ginman 11/13/69-7/19/97” was originally shared as a costume piece for the 2019 Bennington College 24 Hour Play Event, and through an amazing collaborative process with playwright Maia Villa and director David Drake, the memorial garment was incorporated into a new short play, Remembrance. This opportunity shifted me back into making clothing, and the piece was later shown at the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts. Eric and I were lovers both before I graduated from Bennington College and afterwards, and he died five years after his own graduation, in 1997 of complications from AIDS before he reached the age of 30. He’d sent me beautiful self-portraits which I held privately for years and then had printed onto silk as part of the textile collage process for this piece. Sometimes one puts the mourning down until there is space and presence to return to the ache of grief.

Initially when I returned back to the body, it was making activist and specifically memorial works to wear to actions and protests against gun violence as part of my work with Gays Against Guns, a nonviolent direct action group combatting the gun violence epidemic in the United States. I’m continuing a series of wearable art garments that arise from my ongoing research identifying and honoring individuals killed by guns, now starting a third year-specific memorial garment. I’ve worn these garments as part of actions and vigils, but more frequently they are displayed without someone wearing them which provides the viewer a sense of the empty spaces once held by the living.

Lately, I’m also making clothing that is fashion art with activist messaging through use of hand-embroidered or hand-beaded text; most notably showcased in the elaborate textile collage garment I designed for theater producer, Jordan Roth, to wear to the Met Gala in September, 2021, which was inspired by Roth’s original prose describing gender expression and identity worn like a garment, always in a state of manifesting and unraveling, changing. I got to work with an incredible team from Vogue magazine including editor Michael Philouze and master dressmaker, Bill Bull.

"to ward off late stage capitalism" by MIchael Sylvan Robinson was shown at SPRING / BREAK Art Show in NYC, Sept 2021 in exhibition curated by Katrina Majkut. Sculptural garment with textile collage, stenciled text and wood block printing with machine and hand-stitching, sequins and beading, buttons on fabric (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"to ward off late stage capitalism" by MIchael Sylvan Robinson was shown at SPRING / BREAK Art Show in NYC, Sept 2021 in exhibition curated by Katrina Majkut. Sculptural garment with textile collage, stenciled text and wood block printing with machine and hand-stitching, sequins and beading, buttons on fabric (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"Love Letter to Queer Descendants" by MIchael Sylvan Robinson was shown at the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts (2021) and at the Textile Center of Minneapolis (2020). Sculptural garment with textile collage, stenciled text and wood block printing with machine and hand-stitching, sequins and beading, buttons on fabric (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"Love Letter to Queer Descendants" by MIchael Sylvan Robinson was shown at the Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts (2021) and at the Textile Center of Minneapolis (2020). Sculptural garment with textile collage, stenciled text and wood block printing with machine and hand-stitching, sequins and beading, buttons on fabric (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"to ward off late stage capitalism" by MIchael Sylvan Robinson was shown at SPRING / BREAK Art Show in NYC, Sept 2021 in exhibition curated by Katrina Majkut. Sculptural garment with textile collage, stenciled text and wood block printing with machine and hand-stitching, sequins and beading, buttons on fabric (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"to ward off late stage capitalism" by MIchael Sylvan Robinson was shown at SPRING / BREAK Art Show in NYC, Sept 2021 in exhibition curated by Katrina Majkut. Sculptural garment with textile collage, stenciled text and wood block printing with machine and hand-stitching, sequins and beading, buttons on fabric (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi

In addition to fabric, you use a lot of other materials. How do you choose them and do they have an intrinsic meaning, a semantic value themselves? And how many are recycled materials?

I’ll admit that I have a pretty keen eye and hand for the embellishments! Living in New York, I do invest in materials through the Garment District businesses when purchasing textiles. Since my work is about bringing small pieces together to create larger forms, I don’t need much yardage of any one fabric, and I think of some of my textile “ingredients” like a cook using saffron, a little goes a long way.

I do repurpose some of my materials, especially as people give me fabric or family items like vintage jewelry or buttons, sewing supplies. I’ve made works that are specifically designed with upcycled components or use alternative materials, but that’s not my main approach, though I greatly appreciate the artists and designers with those intentions more at the heart of their work and practice.

Sylvan wearing "Pulse: We Remember" memorial garment marshaling at Marking Five Years: Pulse Vigil with Gays Against Guns (NYC, 2021) Photo courtesy of the artist.
Sylvan wearing "Pulse: We Remember" memorial garment marshaling at Marking Five Years: Pulse Vigil with Gays Against Guns (NYC, 2021) Photo courtesy of the artist.
Sylvan wearing memorial garment "In Remembrance: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" marshaling Transgender Day of Remembrance Vigil with Gays Againts Guns. (NYC, 2020) Photo credit: Paul Rowley
Sylvan wearing memorial garment "In Remembrance: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" marshaling Transgender Day of Remembrance Vigil with Gays Againts Guns. (NYC, 2020) Photo credit: Paul Rowley

Your works are extremely dense and full of elements. How do they take shape and how do you proceed from the first idea to the finished work? And does this density have an assertive value?

I work on several pieces at a time, sometimes over a couple of years for larger works, as my process is very hand-labor intensive. Sometimes it can be several years before I get to an idea I’d sketched out earlier, but I’m also drawn to starting new things so there’s always lots of pieces “not quite finished,” and other works that come to fruition more promptly. I’ve also started to add some commissioned works to my practice, and those have processes specifically connected to the inspired (and inspiring) patron! I agree that my work is very intensely embellished, layered, one could even describe it as “overworked,” and there are times I consider what a “lighter touch” might mean for me. I really do want all the details to be special, bringing handwork to make every added layer uniquely realized. Use of text is in most of my work, but there are times that I chose not to use words or images as part of an approach to a specific series or piece.

"Mourning Jacket for a Sweet Satyr: In Remembrance of Eric J. Ginman 11/13/69-7/19/97" sculptural garment by Michael Sylvan Robinson h: 52' x w: 26" x d: 9" (2021) front view. Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi

How much autobiographical are your works? And how much are art and life intertwined for you?

I do have some specifically autobiographical work, but more often, I’m creating from an investigation of something that interests or challenges me, and trying to explore those themes in ways that invites others to consider, too. It is true that everything I make has a direct connection to my activism and spiritual practices as my art-making is a deeply anchored, personal practice.

How has your artistic work evolved over time?

Initially, as a costume designer, I had a signature use of very bold patterns and color work in my design and construction practice. After a fairly successful design focus both at school and in professional theater, I noticed that I preferred making clothes that weren’t always about a specific actor or role, and I went back to graduate school and shifted my costume design skills towards a more specific visual arts practice of fiber art, creating sculptural garments that weren’t meant to be worn as well as two dimensional works. Lately, I’ve reengaged making special clothing pieces that are wearable, too.

"In Remembrance: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" sculptural garment by Michael Sylvan Robinson h: 52' x w: 50" x d: 14" (2021) back and detail views. Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi

What is the work that represents you the most and why?

In many ways, the most “me” work I ever created was the art fashion garment commissioned and worn by Jordan Roth for the Met Gala. It is interesting that the piece was so personal for me, when it was created with Roth’s actual own words embroidered and beaded onto the surface of the textile collage, but the creation of this special work very much arose from our conversations together about fashion and gender, gender identity expression, and how those areas of exploration were important to Jordan’s approach to the theme of this year’s Met Gala.  Everything I know how to do, and beyond anything I’d ever imagined to try, I got to explore through this incredible opportunity. It was really a life-changing experience!

"In Remembrance: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" sculptural garment by Michael Sylvan Robinson h: 52' x w: 50" x d: 14" (2021) back and detail views. Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi

What are you working on and what are you planning for the future?

I’ve started a new series of small textile collage sculptural busts, an “oracle” series, and I’m super inspired by the process and the pieces so far; there’s definitely mending/repairing the ruins feeling to these works that is very evocative and timely, while the work is a deliberate, focused joining of very small hand-worked textile pieces, so very intimate and repetitive in a purposeful process. I was very much inspired by a recent trip to Rome and a visit to Pompeii. I’d remembered vividly a childhood trip to Pompeii, and this was an opportunity to experience the visit now with a strong art history background. In the unsettled times we live in, I’ve been considering the role of craft and artistry in response to the challenges of our era, like in my “to ward off late stage capitalism” piece from 2021 that was exhibited in the SPRING / BREAK Art Show this fall.

Also, after a bit of a longer delay than I’d intended, I’m resuming some more specific fashion art, wearable works evolving from the Met Gala commissioned garment I designed for Jordan Roth. I’m working now with costume designer, Kim Griffin, who helped assist me with the Met Gala garment, on a min-collection of capes for my “protective wear for urban faeries” series. I’m also excited to be joining Bennington College, as a guest faculty member (and alum) in the fall, teaching a course in art/fashion/activism that will culminate in a collaborative, intergenerational art fashion show project!

Sculptural Garments. Courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Sculptural Garments
Interviste

MICHAEL SYLVAN ROBINSON

*Foto in evdidenza: Front view of “Venus Rising: a Contemporary Invocation” by Michael Sylvan Robinson. Sculptural garment, textile collage with machine and hand-stitching, beading, hand-stenciled poetic text 28″ x 38″ x 2″ (2019) was exhibited by the Society for Embroidered Work during Rome Art Week 2021, and is currently exhibited in “Adorned: Inspired by Fabric and Fashion” at the Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center in Solomons, Maryland

Nella pratica artistica di Michael Sylvan Robinson arte, scultura, moda, street art e attivismo queer sono indissolubilmente intrecciati. L’artista utilizza una molteplicità di tecniche e materiali sovrapponendo tessuti selezionati in collage stratificati rifiniti con cuciture a macchina e a mano e perline in una sovrabbondanza di dettagli che conduce l’osservatore verso l’interno dell’opera e la sua struttura concettuale.

Fiber artist genderqueer, educatore, Robinson ha conseguito il MFA in Arti Interdisciplinari presso il Goddard College (2008) e un BA al Bennington College con un’enfasi sulla danza e sul teatro. Dall’esperienza di costumista e artista performativo, ha sviluppato una ricerca orientata verso la fiber art realizzando opere bidimensionali, sculture indossabili e installazioni esposte in ambito internazionale in gallerie private e sedi istituzionali e museali – a Palazzo Velli per la Rome Art Week, SPRING/BREAK Art Show, il National Queer Arts Festival di San Francisco e il Wisconsin Museum of Quilts e FiberArt.

Il suo lavoro in cui coniuga arte e moda è stato fotografato per Vogue Germania e un’opera commissionata e indossata al Met Gala nel 2021 da Jordan Roth, produttore teatrale, una collaborazione raccontata in un’intervista rilasciata a Vogue.

"Venus Rising: a Contemporary Invocation" retro, di Michael Sylvan Robinson. Indumento scultoreo, collage tessile con cuciture a macchina e a mano, perline, testo poetico stencilato a mano 28" x 38" x 2" (2019) è stato esposto dalla Society for Embroidered Work durante la Rome Art Week 2021, ed è attualmente esposto in "Adorned: Inspired by Fabric and Fashion" all'Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center di Solomons, Maryland

Genderqueer fiber artist, attivista, educatore: mi racconti chi è Michael Sylvan Robinson e come si racconta attraverso la pratica artistica?

Mi chiamano Sylvan, uso il mio nome completo professionalmente e per le formalità, ma solo Sylvan nella vita di tutti i giorni. Uso i pronomi loro/lui. Mi sono riconosciuto come genderqueer per la maggior parte della mia vita, anche se ci sono stati momenti in cui ho tenuto quella consapevolezza un po’nascosta e l’ho espressa poco a livello esteriore. Ora, a metà della mia vita, mi sento molto ispirato e rigenerato dal riconoscermi in questa espansione generazionale dell’espressione e dell’identità di genere.

Il mio lavoro in questo mondo è un’intersezione di arte, attivismo ed educazione artistica. Tutti e tre questi percorsi si sono intrecciati nei miei primi anni formativi come giovane persona queer a New York City alla fine degli anni ’80 e nei primi anni ’90. All’inizio ero un costumista, un artista performativo e un drag performer, e queste esperienze hanno costituito una grande base per la mia pratica di fiber art di oggi!

Durante quei primi anni a New York, ho partecipato agli incontri e alle azioni di Queer Nation e ACT UP mentre molti dei miei amici stavano morendo a causa delle complicazioni dell’AIDS; essere utile, prendersi cura degli altri e della comunità ha significato molto per il mio sviluppo come persona. Oggi sono un membro attivo di Gays Against Guns, un gruppo di azione diretta nonviolenta che cerca di fermare l’epidemia di violenza delle armi da fuoco. Metto la mia arte a disposizione di questo lavoro, creando indumenti commemorativi da indossare nelle azioni e nelle veglie commemorative. Faccio ricerche su coloro che sono stati uccisi dalla violenza delle armi da fuoco e cerco di condividere ciò che riesco a imparare sulla loro vita in modo che, grazie alle nostre azioni, siano onorati e ricordati.

Met Gala 2021, Jordan Roth in Michael Sylvan Robinson, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson

Da dove viene – dove e quando è nata – la tua predilezione per il medium tessile?

Uno dei posti nei quali mi sentivo più al sicuro al college era il negozio di costumi. Da giovane ero molto ispirato dalla moda e dal creare costumi. Come adolescente negli anni ’80 c’erano molte icone di genere non conforme a cui ispirarsi – Boy George, Annie Lennox, Prince – sono stati alcuni dei primi video musicali che ricordo di aver visto, e in quegli anni ho indossato trucco e abiti deliberatamente genderfluid mentre esploravo la mia creatività e la mia identità personale.

Quando sono tornato al Goddard College per conseguire un MFA, ho orientato le mie abilità nel progettare e realizzare costumi verso una pratica più incentrata sulle arti visive. Ho partecipato a una conferenza di sviluppo professionale a Baltimora come parte del mio lavoro di insegnamento. Una delle relatrici era l’incredibile Joyce J. Scott, che ha condiviso con noi la sua arte interdisciplinare e il suo amore per i materiali, compresa la lavorazione con le perline. Subito dopo la conferenza sono andato in un negozio del posto e sono tornato a casa con i miei primi barattoli di perline di vetro dai colori vivaci, ancora oggi una componente importante del mio lavoro. Sono attratto dalla decorazione per la sua capacità di deliziare l’occhio ma la bellezza del mio lavoro è anche un invito a confrontarsi con un messaggio militante o con progetti tematici impegnativi che fanno parte del mio modo di fare arte.

La lavorazione manuale è un aspetto importante di tutto il mio fare arte, è una pratica intensa. A volte mi sento come una specie di ragno fatato che ricama avidamente con colori brillanti e perline scintillanti, e altre volte mi sento come Tremotino che fila la paglia in oro con scadenze sempre più veloci e ravvicinate. Il mio studio è a casa mia, e questo mi aiuta a mantenere i progetti a lungo termine in continuo sviluppo anche se ho solo poco tempo a disposizione nello studio quando torno da scuola.

Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021. Detail. Courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021. Detail. Courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Met Gala 2021, courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson

Corpo, abito, identità: qual è secondo te la relazione tra questi elementi e come sono declinati nelle tue opere?

Spesso il mio lavoro riguarda l’assenza del corpo, realizzo abiti scultorei che sono pezzi commemorativi, che sottolineano un’assenza. Il mio “Mourning Jacket for a Sweet Satyr: In Remembrance of Eric J. Ginman 11/13/69-7/19/97” è stato originariamente proposto come costume per il Bennington College 24 Hour Play Event del 2019, e attraverso un incredibile processo di collaborazione con la drammaturga Maia Villa e il regista David Drake, l’indumento commemorativo è stato incorporato in una nuova, breve opera teatrale intitolata Remembrance.

Questa occasione mi ha spinto di nuovo a fare vestiti, e il pezzo è stato poi esposto al Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts. Eric ed io eravamo amanti sia prima che mi laureassi al Bennington College che dopo, e lui morì, per complicazioni legate all’AIDS, cinque anni dopo la sua stessa laurea e prima di raggiungere i 30 anni, nel 1997. Mi mandava dei bellissimi autoritratti che per anni ho tenuto per me e che poi ho fatto stampare su seta come parte del processo di collage tessile per quest’opera. A volte mettiamo da parte il lutto finché non c’è spazio e presenza per tornare a quel dolore.

Inizialmente, quando sono tornato al corpo, facevo opere di attivismo e in particolare opere commemorative da indossare alle azioni e alle proteste contro la violenza delle armi come parte del mio lavoro con Gays Against Guns, un gruppo di azione diretta nonviolenta che combatte l’epidemia della violenza causata dalle armi da fuoco negli Stati Uniti.

Sto lavorando a una serie di indumenti d’arte indossabili che nascono dalla mia continua ricerca che identifica e onora le persone uccise da armi da fuoco, ora sto iniziando un indumento commemorativo specifico per il terzo anno. Ho indossato questi indumenti durante azioni e veglie, ma più frequentemente mi piace esporli senza l’indossatore, il che offre all’osservatore il senso degli spazi vuoti un tempo occupati dai vivi.

Ultimamente, sto anche creando abiti di fashion arte che veicolano messaggi impegnati attraverso l’uso di testi ricamati a mano e arricchiti di perline, questo è particolarmente visibile nell’elaborato collage tessile che ho progettato per il produttore teatrale Jordan Roth, da indossare al Met Gala nel settembre 2021, ispirato alla prosa originale di Roth che descrive l’espressione del genere e dell’ identità indossate come un abito, sempre in uno stato di manifestazione e rivelazione, di cambiamento. Ho potuto lavorare con un team incredibile della rivista Vogue, tra cui l’editore Michael Philouze e il maestro sarto Bill Bull.

"Priestessing the Work of Healing" di Michael Sylvan Robinson è apparso su Vogue Germania (aprile 2021) con la fotografia di Guinevere Van Seenus, ed è stato esposto allo SPRING / BREAK Art Show a NYC, settembre 2021 in una mostra curata da Katrina Majkut. Abito d'arte indossabile con collage tessile, testo stencilato e stampa a blocchi di legno con cucitura a macchina e a mano, paillettes e perline, bottoni su tessuto; questo pezzo utilizza anche resti regalati dal workshop Pride Flag di Gilbert Baker (2021) h: 60" x w: 24" x 34" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"Priestessing the Work of Healing" di Michael Sylvan Robinson è apparso su Vogue Germania (aprile 2021) con la fotografia di Guinevere Van Seenus, ed è stato esposto allo SPRING / BREAK Art Show a NYC, settembre 2021 in una mostra curata da Katrina Majkut. Abito d'arte indossabile con collage tessile, testo stencilato e stampa a blocchi di legno con cucitura a macchina e a mano, paillettes e perline, bottoni su tessuto; questo pezzo utilizza anche resti regalati dal workshop Pride Flag di Gilbert Baker (2021) h: 60" x w: 24" x 34" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"Love Letter to Queer Descendants" di MIchael Sylvan Robinson è stato esposto al Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts (2021) e al Textile Center of Minneapolis (2020). Indumento scultoreo con collage tessile, testo stencilato e stampa a blocchi di legno con cucitura a macchina e a mano, paillettes e perline, bottoni su tessuto (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"Love Letter to Queer Descendants" di MIchael Sylvan Robinson è stato esposto al Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts (2021) e al Textile Center of Minneapolis (2020). Indumento scultoreo con collage tessile, testo stencilato e stampa a blocchi di legno con cucitura a macchina e a mano, paillettes e perline, bottoni su tessuto (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"to ward off late stage capitalism" di MIchael Sylvan Robinson è stato mostrato allo SPRING / BREAK Art Show a NYC, Sept 2021 in mostra curata da Katrina Majkut. Indumento scultoreo con collage tessile, testo stenciled e stampa a blocchi di legno con cucitura a macchina e a mano, paillettes e perline, bottoni su tessuto (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi
"to ward off late stage capitalism" di MIchael Sylvan Robinson è stato mostrato allo SPRING / BREAK Art Show a NYC, Sept 2021 in mostra curata da Katrina Majkut. Indumento scultoreo con collage tessile, testo stenciled e stampa a blocchi di legno con cucitura a macchina e a mano, paillettes e perline, bottoni su tessuto (2021) h: 28" x w: 32" x 2" Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi

Oltre al tessuto, utilizzi moltissimi altri materiali. Come li scegli e hanno un significato intrinseco, un valore semantico in sé? E quanti sono materiali di recupero o di scarto?

Ammetto di avere un occhio e un tocco piuttosto acuti per le decorazioni! Vivendo a New York, quando acquisto dei tessuti, investo in materiali attraverso le aziende del Garment District. Dato che il mio lavoro consiste nel mettere insieme piccoli pezzi per creare forme più grandi, non ho bisogno di molti metri di un solo tessuto, e penso ad alcuni dei miei “ingredienti” tessili come un cuoco che usa lo zafferano, una piccola quantità è sufficiente.

Riutilizzo alcuni dei miei materiali, specialmente quando le persone mi danno tessuti o oggetti di famiglia come gioielli vintage, bottoni o accessori per il cucito. Ho fatto lavori che sono stati specificamente progettati con elementi riciclati o dove ho usato materiali alternativi, ma questo non è il mio approccio principale, anche se apprezzo molto gli artisti e i designer che hanno questi intenti nel cuore del loro lavoro e della loro pratica.

Sylvan wearing "Pulse: We Remember" memorial garment marshaling at Marking Five Years: Pulse Vigil with Gays Against Guns (NYC, 2021) Photo courtesy of the artist.
Sylvan wearing "Pulse: We Remember" memorial garment marshaling at Marking Five Years: Pulse Vigil with Gays Against Guns (NYC, 2021) Photo courtesy of the artist.
Sylvan wearing memorial garment "In Remembrance: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" marshaling Transgender Day of Remembrance Vigil with Gays Againts Guns. (NYC, 2020) Photo credit: Paul Rowley
Sylvan wearing memorial garment "In Remembrance: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" marshaling Transgender Day of Remembrance Vigil with Gays Againts Guns. (NYC, 2020) Photo credit: Paul Rowley

Le tue opere sono estremamente fitte e dense di elementi. Come prendono forma, come procedi partendo dalla prima idea fino al lavoro finito? E questa densità ha una cifra assertiva?

Lavoro a diversi pezzi contemporaneamente, a volte nell’arco di un paio d’anni per i lavori più grandi, dato che il mio processo richiede molto lavoro manuale. A volte possono passare diversi anni prima che io arrivi a sviluppare un’idea che avevo precedentemente abbozzato, ma sono anche attratto dall’ iniziare nuove cose, così ci sono sempre molti pezzi “non del tutto finiti”, e altri lavori che vengono chiusi più rapidamente. Inoltre ho iniziato ad accettare commissioni e queste hanno processi specificamente connessi al mecenate ispirato (e che mi ispira)! Sono d’accordo che il mio lavoro è intensamente impreziosito, stratificato, si potrebbe anche descrivere come ” sovraccarico”; ci sono momenti in cui considero cosa potrebbe significare per me applicare un “tocco più leggero “. Voglio davvero che tutti i dettagli siano speciali, lavoro tutto a mano per rendere ogni strato aggiuntivo una realizzazione unica. L’uso del testo è presente nella maggior parte del mio lavoro, ma ci sono volte in cui scelgo di approcciarmi a una particolare serie o a un pezzo senza usare parole o immagini.

"Mourning Jacket for a Sweet Satyr: In Remembrance of Eric J. Ginman 11/13/69-7/19/97" indumento scultoreo di Michael Sylvan Robinson h: 52' x w: 26" x d: 9" (2021) vista frontale. Photo credit: Paul Takeuchi

Quanto sono autobiografici i tuoi lavori e quanto si intrecciano, per te, arte e vita?

Alcuni dei miei lavori sono specificamente autobiografici, ma più spesso, creo da una ricerca su qualcosa che mi interessa o mi mette in discussione, cerco di esplorare questi temi con modalità che invitano anche gli altri a riflettere. È vero che tutto quello che faccio ha una connessione diretta con il mio attivismo e le mie pratiche spirituali, perché il mio fare arte è una pratica profondamente radicata e personale.

Come si è evoluto il tuo lavoro artistico?

Inizialmente, in qualità di designer di costumi, il mio lavoro era caratterizzato da modelli e colori molto audaci. Dopo un discreto successo nel design, sia a scuola che nel teatro professionale, ho notato che preferivo fare abiti che non fossero per forza legati a uno specifico attore o ruolo, e sono tornato alla scuola di specializzazione indirizzando le mie capacità di costumista verso una pratica più specifica nelle arti visive e nella fiber art, creando capi scultorei che non erano destinati a essere indossati, così come opere bidimensionali. Ultimamente, ho ripreso a fare opere che sono anche pezzi di abbigliamento indossabili.

"In ricordo: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" indumento scultoreo di Michael Sylvan Robinson h: 52' x w: 50" x d: 14" (2021), dettaglio. Credito fotografico: Paul Takeuchi

Qual è l’opera che più ti rappresenta e perché?

Per molti versi, il lavoro che più mi appartiene è l’abito di moda artistica commissionato e indossato da Jordan Roth per il Met Gala. È interessante che io consideri quest’opera così intima quando è stata creata ricamando le parole di Roth, con le perline sulla superficie del collage tessile; ma la creazione di quest’opera speciale è nata soprattutto dalle nostre conversazioni su moda e sessualità, sull’espressione dell’identità di genere, e su come queste aree di esplorazione fossero importanti per l’approccio di Jordan al tema del Met Gala di quell’anno.  Tutto ciò che so fare, e al di là di tutto ciò che avrei mai immaginato di provare, l’ho potuto sperimentare attraverso questa incredibile opportunità. È stata davvero un’esperienza che mi ha cambiato la vita!

"In ricordo: We Honor the Lives of Those Lost in 2020 to Gun Violence" indumento scultoreo di Michael Sylvan Robinson h: 52' x w: 50" x d: 14" (2021). Credito fotografico: Paul Takeuchi

A cosa stai lavorando e cosa stai progettando per il futuro?

Ho iniziato una nuova serie di piccoli busti scultorei in collage tessile, una serie “oracolo”, e sono estremamente ispirato dal processo e da queste opere finora; c’è sicuramente una sensazione di rammendo/riparazione delle rovine che è molto evocativa e attuale, mentre il lavoro è un deliberato, mirato assemblaggio di pezzi tessili molto piccoli lavorati a mano, quindi un processo molto intimo, ripetitivo e intenzionale. Sono stato fortemente ispirato da un recente viaggio a Roma e da una visita a Pompei. Ricordo vividamente un viaggio d’infanzia a Pompei, e questa è stata un’opportunità per rivivere quella visita avendo acquisito solide conoscenze di storia dell’arte. Nei tempi instabili in cui viviamo, mi sono soffermato a considerare il ruolo dell’artigianato e dell’arte in risposta alle sfide della nostra epoca, come nel mio pezzo “to ward off late stage capitalism” (per scongiurare il capitalismo in fase avanzata) del 2021 che è stato esposto nello SPRING / BREAK Art Show questo autunno.

Inoltre, dopo un ritardo un po’ più lungo del previsto, sto riprendendo alcuni lavori di fashion art, opere indossabili che si evolvono dall’abito commissionato per il Met Gala che ho disegnato per Jordan Roth. Ora sto lavorando con la costumista Kim Griffin, che mi ha aiutato a realizzare l’abito per il Met Gala, a una mini collezione di mantelle per la mia serie “protective wear for urban faeries”. Sono anche entusiasta di unirmi al Bennington College, in autunno, come membro di facoltà aggiunto (ed ex-alunno), insegnando un corso di arte/moda/attivismo che culminerà in un progetto collaborativo e intergenerazionale di moda artistica!

Courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson
Courtesy Michael Sylvan Robinson

Barbara Pavan

English version Sono nata a Monza nel 1969 ma cresciuta in provincia di Biella, terra di filati e tessuti. Mi sono occupata lungamente di arte contemporanea, dopo aver trasformato una passione in una professione. Ho curato mostre, progetti espositivi, manifestazioni culturali, cataloghi e blog tematici, collaborando con associazioni, gallerie, istituzioni pubbliche e private. Da qualche anno la mia attenzione è rivolta prevalentemente verso l’arte tessile e la fiber art, linguaggi contemporanei che assecondano un antico e mai sopito interesse per i tappeti ed i tessuti antichi. Su ARTEMORBIDA voglio raccontare la fiber art italiana, con interviste alle artiste ed agli artisti e recensioni degli eventi e delle mostre legate all’arte tessile sul territorio nazionale.