Interview

PETER CLOUSE

*Featured photo:: Weaving, photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Traduzione a cura di Elena Redaelli

A visual artist originally from Grand Rapids, MI, Peter Clouse graduated from Saginaw Valley State University and received his MFA in fibres from Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, MI.

Clouse’s works appear as large weavings of thread, like modern graffiti in which traditional textile practices are juxtaposed with bold, contemporary patterns and forms. Electric wire is the distinctive feature of these laboriously produced tapestries. The weaves accumulate and overlap in an activity of complex manipulation. The artist expresses his intention to create order from chaos and enhance the beauty and potential of poor and discarded materials in a responsible and environmentally sustainable manner.

Clouse’s work has been shown in group exhibitions in the United States. His recent achievements include being a visiting Artist and Lecturer for the U.S. “Arts in Embassies” in Botswana and solo shows in Saginaw, Bay City, and Royal Oak, MI.

https://www.peterclouse.com/

Wires, Close up of Weaving, photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright peter Clouse

How did you approach art? Why the choice of textile techniques?

I approach art like life, with an open mind. I have guidelines for my art practice but leave space to experiment and fail; failing is how you know you’re doing it right.

Textiles are in all aspects of life. From the shirt on your back to the chair you’re sitting on we interact with textiles all day long. Textiles are an approachable and universal medium.

Conjecture, 2016, 3’10” X 3’3" X 7". Wire weaving that breaks the normal guidelines and structure of traditional weaving. It is more of a chaos weave. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

What is the central theme you develop through your works?

Creating patterns by juxtaposing chaos and order, mirroring societal norms of overwhelming consumption and waste. I am invested in breaking down societal norms including the gendered practices of textile creation and craft.

Blasphemous, 2018, 9”3’ X 8”10’ X 8”. Wire weaving that breaks the normal guidelines and structure of traditional weaving. It is more of a chaos weave. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

You create your weavings using recycled electronic wires. In the choice of this material, can we see the intent to express through your work a reflection on the role that digital reality plays in our lives today?

No. I lean into the ideas of power, consumption, and technological waste. My work exists first in the physical realm and that is where my interests reside. The manipulation of materials and society’s ease in discarding “old” technology for the next best thing is my focus.

Wave Length, 2012, 3’ X 2'5" X 6". Ethernet wires woven into a metal Mesh. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse
Wave Length-detail, 2012, 3’ X 2'5" X 6”. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Let’s talk about the process. What are the most challenging aspects you deal with during the creation of a work?

The most challenging aspect of creating my work can vary; space, time, and physical pain. The space it takes to create these large scale weavings and store pallets worth of materials. The laborious hours, days, and weeks it takes to weave these pieces. The physical pain of crouching for hours on end, manipulating weavings, and hanging the work; until you assist in hanging one of my weavings you never truly understand the physical weight of one.

Arduously, 2013, 8’ X 4’ X 5”. Electronic Wire weaving. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Delineate Society. Can you tell us about the genesis of this work? Why this title?

My work has always been fluid and intuitive. I start with a loose idea or goal and set of parameters for techniques or patterns or time allowances. This piece was created in two weeks with the idea of creating ordered patterns from the chaos of discarded wire. Discarded materials become a frayed tapestry; textile from the undesired and overlooked trash of American Society.

Delineate Society, 2013, 14’ X 5’ X 3". Electronic Wire Weaving. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Art in Embassies. You participated in this program as a visiting artist at the Botswana Embassy. Can you tell us what this project consists of and what impact this experience has had on your personal and professional path?

Being involved with Art in Embassies was an amazing experience. I was invited to facilitate art lessons and give presentations on my art and practices across Botswana.

I had the honor of traveling across the country meeting artists and educators, as well as participating in the Maun International Arts Festival.

The Ambassador of Botswana displayed a weaving of mine in the Embassy and years later the red dirt remains adding to it’s story just as my experiences in Botswana added to my life’s story. Being in Botswana opened my eyes to an entirely different world and humbled me. I was told that the heat of Botswana was a warm hug welcoming you and I will never forget the people I met there; I even remain in contact with a few of them years later.

Swivel, 2014, 3’6” X 4’4” X 3”. Wire weaving that breaks the normal guidelines and structure of traditional weaving. It is more of a chaos weave. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Still talking about your weavings, how has this series of works changed from the first work a few years ago to today? How have they evolved?

My weavings have evolved over the years becoming more complex and embellished.
They have grown in scale and become more graphic, almost painterly. Once they were small tapestries created on a loom and now they have morphed into installations that engulf a viewer or an entire space.

What are you working on at the moment?

I am currently working on multiple projects that haven’t completely come together. I’m making weavings larger than I have ever made before. I am using new mediums and forms of waste to embellish the wire tapestries. This is all in the trial and error stages so there is much more to come. I’m not sure where it will take me but being a new parent, and a pandemic parent at that, has definitely become an influence in my art practice.

Interviste

PETER CLOUSE

*Foto in evidenza: Weaving, photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Traduzione a cura di Elena Redaelli

Peter Clouse, artista visivo originario di Grand Rapids, MI, si è laureato presso la Saginaw Valley State University e ha ricevuto il suo MFA nelle fibre, presso la Cranbrook Academy of Art di Bloomfield Hills, MI.

Le opere di Clouse si presentano come grandi tessiture di fili elettrici, come moderni graffiti in cui le tradizionali pratiche tessili si affiancano a motivi e forme audaci e contemporanee. Il materiale di cui sono fatte, il filo elettrico, è la caratteristica distintiva di questi arazzi dalla produzione laboriosa, opere in cui gli intrecci si accumulano e si sovrappongono in una attività di complessa manipolazione attraverso la quale l’artista esprime l’intenzione di creare ordine dal caos e di valorizzare la bellezza e le potenzialità di materiali poveri e di scarto in un’ottica di responsabile eco-sostenibilità.

Le opere di Clouse sono state esposte in mostre collettive negli Stati Uniti e i suoi recenti successi includono la visita nelle ambasciate in Botswana come artista e docente per le arti statunitensi e mostre personali a Saginaw, Bay City e Royal Oak, MI

https://www.peterclouse.com/

Wires, Close up of Weaving, photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright peter Clouse

Come ti sei avvicinato all’arte? Perché la scelta delle tecniche tessili?

Mi avvicino all’arte come alla vita, con una mente aperta. Per la mia pratica artistica ho delle linee guida, ma lascio anche spazio alla sperimentazione e al fallimento; il fallimento ti fa capire di essere sulla strada giusta.

I tessuti sono in tutti gli aspetti della vita. Dalla camicia che indossi alla sedia su cui sei seduto, interagiamo con i tessuti ogni giorno. I tessuti sono un mezzo accessibile e universale.

Conjecture, 2016, 3’10” X 3’3" X 7". Wire weaving that breaks the normal guidelines and structure of traditional weaving. It is more of a chaos weave. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Qual è il tema centrale che sviluppi attraverso le tue opere?

Creare modelli giustapponendo caos e ordine, commentando visivamente le norme sociali di consumo e spreco eccessivo. Sono impegnato ad abbattere le norme sociali, comprese quelle relative alle pratiche di genere nella creazione tessile e dell’artigianato.

Blasphemous, 2018, 9”3’ X 8”10’ X 8”. Wire weaving that breaks the normal guidelines and structure of traditional weaving. It is more of a chaos weave. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Crei i tuoi arazzi utilizzando fili elettrici di recupero. Nella scelta di questo materiale, possiamo ravvisare l’intento di esprimere attraverso il tuo lavoro una riflessione sul ruolo che la realtà digitale riveste oggi nelle nostre vite?

No. Sono interessato ai concetti di potere, consumo e spreco tecnologico. Il mio lavoro esiste innanzitutto nel regno fisico ed è lì che risiedono i miei interessi. Il mio obiettivo è la manipolazione dei materiali e mostrare la facilità con la quale la società scarta la “vecchia” tecnologia per la prossima cosa migliore.

Wave Length, 2012, 3’ X 2'5" X 6". Ethernet wires woven into a metal Mesh. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse
Wave Length-detail, 2012, 3’ X 2'5" X 6”. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Parliamo del processo. Quali sono gli aspetti più impegnativi con cui ti confronti durante la creazione di un’opera?

Gli aspetti più impegnativi della creazione del mio lavoro possono variare: spazio, tempo e dolore fisico. Lo spazio necessario per creare queste tessiture su larga scala e immagazzinare i bancali di materiale. Le ore di lavoro intenso, i giorni e le settimane che ci vogliono per tessere questi pezzi. Il dolore fisico nel restare accovacciato per ore e ore, nel manipolare i tessuti e appendere il lavoro; finché non si assiste all’installazione di una delle mie tessiture non se ne comprende veramente il peso fisico.

Arduously, 2013, 8’ X 4’ X 5”. Electronic Wire weaving. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Delineate Society. Puoi parlarci della genesi di questo lavoro? Perché questo titolo?

Il mio lavoro è sempre stato fluido e intuitivo. Inizio con una idea o un obiettivo non definito stabilendo dei parametri per le tecniche o le forme o il tempo a disposizione. Questo pezzo è stato creato in due settimane con l’idea di trarre dei motivi ordinati dal caos del filo usato. I materiali dismessi diventano un arazzo sfrangiato tessuto dalla spazzatura indesiderata e sottovalutata della società americana.

Delineate Society, 2013, 14’ X 5’ X 3". Electronic Wire Weaving. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Art in Embassies. Hai partecipato a questo programma come artista in visita presso l’Ambasciata del Botswana. Puoi raccontare in cosa consiste questo progetto e che impatto ha avuto questa esperienza sul tuo percorso personale e professionale?

Essere coinvolto con Art in Embassies è stata un’esperienza incredibile. Sono stato invitato a coadiuvare lezioni d’arte e dare presentazioni sul mio lavoro artistico in tutto il Botswana. Ho avuto l’onore di viaggiare attraverso il paese incontrando artisti ed educatori, oltre a partecipare al Maun International Arts Festival.

L’ambasciatore del Botswana ha esposto una mia tessitura nell’ambasciata e, anni dopo, la terra rossa rimane ad arricchire la storia dell’opera così come le mie esperienze in Botswana hanno arricchito la storia della mia vita. Trovarmi in Botswana mi ha aperto gli occhi su un mondo completamente diverso, rendendomi più umile. Si dice che il calore del Botswana sia un caldo abbraccio che ti accoglie e io non dimenticherò mai le persone che ho incontrato lì; sono ancora in contatto con alcuni di loro anni dopo.

Swivel, 2014, 3’6” X 4’4” X 3”. Wire weaving that breaks the normal guidelines and structure of traditional weaving. It is more of a chaos weave. Photo cr. Melissa Haimowitz Clouse, copyright Peter Clouse

Sempre parlando dei tuoi arazzi, in che modo questa serie di opere è cambiata dai primi lavori di qualche anno fa ad oggi? Che evoluzione hanno avuto?

Le mie tessiture si sono evolute nel corso degli anni diventando più complesse e rifinite. Sono cresciute in scala e sono diventate più grafiche, quasi pittoriche. Una volta erano piccoli arazzi creati su un telaio e ora si sono trasformati in installazioni che coinvolgono lo spettatore o l’intero spazio.

A cosa stai lavorando in questo momento?

Attualmente sto lavorando a diversi progetti che non sono ancora del tutto realizzati. Sto facendo tessiture più grandi di quanto non abbia mai fatto prima. Sto usando nuovi mezzi e tipologie di rifiuti per abbellire gli arazzi di filo metallico. Tutto questo è ancora in una fase di prova dove faccio degli errori, quindi c’è ancora molto da fare. Non sono sicuro di dove mi porterà, ma essere un neo genitore, ed un genitore durante una pandemia, è sicuramente molto influente nella mia pratica artistica.

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.