Interview

PRETA WOLZAK

*Feathured photo: People With The Yellow Ear 9 and 10 with the artist.
People with the yellow ear #9: this man is composed 33% Kenian 33% Sicilian 34% Canadian. Big Embroidery 150 x 120 cm. People with the yellow ear #10: 33% Iranian 33% Spanish 34% Mozambican. Big Embroidery 150 x 120 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak


Preta Wolzak, a Dutch artist born in 1976, studied monumental design at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, the city where she currently lives and works. Numerous professional experiences have seen her engaged as a furniture designer, stylist for photographers, illustrator for websites and editorial products, and jewelry creator. In 2014 Wolzak finally decided to devote herself exclusively to her own art.

The message, the narrative, are the indispensable elements of her research. The theme of the tourist exploitation of the Poles in the Arctic Charade series, gender discrimination, a topic addressed in the Fighting Women series, are just one example of how the artist, through large canvases embroidered with vibrant yarns, wool, nylon, silk, sequins and paint, addresses topical social and political issues, with a seemingly light vein, a lively atmosphere, which becomes the medium for conveying sometimes difficult ideas and concepts.

https://www.pretawolzak.nl/

Ma Petite Inuite #4, this work is part of the AkzoNobel Art Foundation. Copyright Preta Wolzak

What was your educational background? When did you first become interested in the textile medium and why?

I studied at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, Autonomous department. Eight years ago I decided to stop taking commissions for applied work, and to concentrate on my art. I started combining painting, drawing and photography, and I started to use threads. As a child, over my bed I had a big canvas of a greengrocer. It was composed of small patches of felt and cotton. That, and my love for haberdashery shops (the English word is phenomenal!), that are like candy stores to my eyes, sparked my interest for using textile in art.

Ma Petite Inuite # 2, embroidery and leather 40 x 30 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

What is the goal you pursue through your art, the themes you address through your works? Is it important to you that your work tells a story?

I am a storyteller. The work is defined by the stories behind it. That is my guideline; the pace, the message. What I want to convey will not immediately be clear to everyone. The series of works Arctic Charade deals with tourism. I deeply oppose tourism to the Poles. The Poles preserve the balance of our Earth, and they are shaking under the impact of mining and climate change. To be a tourist and have a cruise ship take you to the Poles – just don’t!! My happy acrobats represent tourism; everything seems delightful. The world as a giant amusement park. That is how mass-tourism manifests itself.

#Polarfriends, 300 x 125 cm. 2022 diversi tessuti su tela pelle e paillettes, acrilici, fibre, lana, cotone, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic charade #Polarfox. Polarfox from the series Arctic Charade, sequins leather silk acrylics and leather 140 x 140 cm. 2021, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade #Walrus, from the series Arctic Charade, sequins and leather silk wool cotton acrylics and leather 140 x 140 cm. December 2021, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade #PolarRodeo, 2020 125 x 150. Grande ricamo in pelle con paillettes in acrilico, copyright Preta Wolzak

Are there critical issues, important difficulties that you face as an artist?

A difficult question. My work is inherently slow. It comes into being. It starts with research. Then I will compose an image digitally, explore forms and colors, and work out the dimensions. As soon as my sketch has been materialized on canvas, I can start choosing my materials. Working on, and embroidering such a large canvas is very time-consuming. Everything is done by hand. “A medieval monk in the 23rd century.” The old in a new form. I avoid mainstream techniques like cross-stitching and embroidering, but I try to create depth with threads, through direction and radiance. But the critical issue in my work is time. Automated techniques like weaving or tufting mean loss of texture, color or looseness. Time is essential to the artistic value of my work, but the time it takes to create the work is considerable. Researching and combining materials to invent my own techniques is key, and it is an essential part of my work.

Everybody needs a Hero – G.M vero pioniere antartico GM 40 x 30 cm ricamo e pelle, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade “new Dino”, ricamo e pelle, paillettes, fibre acriliche, 130 x 140 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

Is there a work or series that marked a turning point in your professional development? Can you talk about it?

I think it was in the making of my work Children of St. Kilda (2013) that it dawned upon me that I could get my message across with photography and drawing, and that I could go next level with textile and thread. I realized at that moment that this would be my choice of materials. In the Thirties of the last century there was an outbreak of the flue on the remote island St. Kilda (Hirta) in the Outer Hebrides. It was hardly accessible due to harsh weather conditions and tempestuous tides. Instead of helping the population with medicine and communication, the British government evacuated everyone. There were plans to convert the island into a naval base, which in the end did not happen. This ended 2000 years of unique autarchic habitation. It was an exceptional culture and craftsmanship with the best tweed in the world. This triggered my tribute to the inhabitants of St. Kilda, and the use of textiles enabled me to show them my respect.

The Children of St. Kilda, ricamo, 75 x 385 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

The series People With The Yellow Ear is one of your recent works. What is the underlying theme of this portrait series?

At the start of the COVID period, there were these horrific events between the US police and George Floyd, and the rise of the Black Lives Matter protests. Why can’t we see that there is only one race: the human race. This is a quote by Rosa Parks. I thought it was repulsive that in 2020 we were still fighting Racism. So I started to compose portraits of mixed ethnicities, for example 33% Scottish; 33% Azerbaijani; 34% Fuegian. There are smaller (40x30cm) and larger (150x120cm) portraits. They all have one Yellow Ear, and a vertical yellow line in their face, because they are all my family. They inhabit the Isle of Chuckacaba, where Empathy is the new politics.

PWTYE #22. BIG 150 x 120 cm composed portrait. The last big one from the series People with the yellow ear. Composed portrait 34% Sudanese 33% Dutch 33% Palestine. Wool Cotton Silk Leather and Bark. 2022 copyright Preta Wolzak
People with the yellow ear #20. Un ritratto compost da 33% Scottish 33% Azerbaijani 34% Fuegians. Ricamo a mano e pelle. BIG 150 x 120 cm. 2022, copyright Preta Wolzak
People with the yellow ear # 2. Dall’isola di Chuckacaba. Questa ragazza è 33% Islandic, 33% Brasilian, 34% Ivorian. 40 x 30 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak
People with the yellow ear #11. Dall’isola di Chuckacaba. Questa donna è: 33% Kenian, 33% Irish, 34% Greek. 40 x 30 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

How have your works changed over time, from early works to the present?

I’m constantly doing research into materials and techniques. And I’m always experimenting; can I make my own passementerie, can I use other base media than leather or canvas? I like to make use of errors or failures, for example holes in knitting. At the moment I’m under the spell of cords and bark. And I’m going back to painting and then pulling threads through the canvas. My techniques evolve while working. My toolbox of techniques is increasingly feeling like a painters palet, and the way I work on my canvases resembles the way a painter works.

Arctic Charade #Endurance. Ricamo in corda di pelle, fibre acriliche e paillettes. 125 x 170 cm 2022, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade White, paillettes, ricamo su seta, acrilici 140 x 140 cm. Quest'opera fa parte della collezione d'arte Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, copyright Preta Wolzak
Greetings from mister Sunapee, 85 x 120 cm, ricamo (filo grosso-painting) disegno a matita, acrilico su tela, copyright Preta Wolzak
Bubu est Magnifique, 120 x 100 cm ricamo con acrilico su tela (yarnpainting) (Missoni collection), copyright Preta Wolzak

The bi-personal exhibition: Preta Wolzak and Pieter W. Postma: Twice As Nice And Nowhere To Hide was held from 4 June to 17 July. Tell us about this exhibition, how this project came about. How do your works dialogue with Pieter’s?

The duo exhibition with Pieter W Postma came about because we are both story-tellers, with a focus on social issues. And we are both working with a wide range of materials like leather, wood, textile, and metal. I think it is important to connect with other artists. The art world is densely populated with individualists, but connecting to other works of art and the person behind them, makes you stronger.

Duo exhibition Twice as nice and nowhere to hide, copyright Preta Wolzak

Future projects?

At the moment I’m spending most of my time doing research for my new series on scientists. Scientists who did not get proper credit for their work during their lifetime, due to all kinds of obstruction and injustice. But who were in fact geniuses. People like Srinivasa Ramanujan and Alan Turing. Some were discarded for being black, or gay. But the subject might change, because I’m now also looking at the heroes of Truth, i.e. the founders of Bellincat. Apart from several art fairs that I plan to participate in, like Art The Hague and PAN Amsterdam, I’m looking forward to being part of a group show of textile art in the new Dutch museum MOYA, in October 2022.

Interviste

PRETA WOLZAK

*Foto in evidenza: People With The Yellow Ear 9 e 10 con l’artista. People with the yellow ear #9: quest’uomo è composto per il 33% da kenioti per il 33% da siciliani per il 34% da canadesi. Grande ricamo 150 x 120 cm. People with the yellow ear #10: 33% iraniano 33% spagnolo 34% mozambicano. Grande ricamo 150 x 120 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak


Preta Wolzak, artista olandese classe 1976, ha studiato design monumentale all’Accademia Gerrit Rietveld di Amsterdam, città dove attualmente vive e lavora. Numerose le esperienze professionali che l’hanno vista impegnata come designer di mobili, stylist per fotografi, illustratrice per siti web e prodotti editoriali, creatrice di gioielli. Nel 2014 Wolzak decide infine di dedicarsi in via esclusiva alla propria arte.

Il messaggio, la narrazione, sono gli elementi imprescindibili della sua ricerca. Il tema dello sfruttamento turistico dei Poli nella serie Arctic Charade, la discriminazione di genere, argomento affrontato nella serie Fighting Women, sono solo un esempio di come l’artista, attraverso le grandi tele ricamate con filati vivaci, lana, nylon, seta, paillettes e pittura, affronti argomenti di grande attualità sociale e politica, con una vena di apparente leggerezza, un’atmosfera vivace, che diventa il tramite per veicolare idee e concetti a volte ostici.

https://www.pretawolzak.nl/

Ma Petite Inuite #4, this work is part of the AkzoNobel Art Foundation. Copyright Preta Wolzak

Quale è stato il tuo percorso di formazione? Quando hai iniziato ad interessarti al medium tessile e perché?

Ho studiato all’Accademia Gerrit Rietveld di Amsterdam, dipartimento autonomo. Otto anni fa ho deciso di non accettare più lavori su commissione e di concentrarmi sulla mia arte. Ho iniziato a combinare pittura, disegno e fotografia e a usare i fili. Da bambino, sopra il mio letto avevo una grande tela raffigurante un fruttivendolo. Era composta da piccole macchie di feltro e cotone. Questo e il mio amore per i negozi di merceria (il termine inglese haberdashery è fenomenale!), che sono come negozi di caramelle ai miei occhi, hanno scatenato il mio interesse per l’uso dei tessuti nell’arte.

Ma Petite Inuite # 2, embroidery and leather 40 x 30 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

Quale è l’obiettivo che persegui attraverso la tua arte? Quali i temi che affronti attraverso le tue opere? È importante per te che il tuo lavoro racconti una storia?

Sono un narratore. Il lavoro è definito dalle storie che ci sono dietro. Questa è la mia linea guida: il ritmo, il messaggio. Ciò che voglio trasmettere non sarà immediatamente chiaro a tutti. La serie di opere Arctic Charade tratta il tema del turismo. Sono profondamente contrario al turismo verso i Poli. I Poli preservano l’equilibrio della nostra Terra e stanno soffrendo per l’attività estrattiva e i cambiamenti climatici. Essere un turista e farsi portare ai Poli da una nave da crociera – semplicemente no!!! I miei acrobati felici rappresentano il turismo; tutto sembra delizioso. Il mondo come un gigantesco parco di divertimenti. È così che si manifesta il turismo di massa.

#Polarfriends, 300 x 125 cm. 2022 diversi tessuti su tela pelle e paillettes, acrilici, fibre, lana, cotone, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic charade #Polarfox. Polarfox from the series Arctic Charade, sequins leather silk acrylics and leather 140 x 140 cm. 2021, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade #Walrus, from the series Arctic Charade, sequins and leather silk wool cotton acrylics and leather 140 x 140 cm. December 2021, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade #PolarRodeo, 2020 125 x 150. Grande ricamo in pelle con paillettes in acrilico, copyright Preta Wolzak

Ci sono criticità, difficoltà rilevanti che affronti come artista?

Una domanda difficile. Il mio lavoro è intrinsecamente lento. Inizia con una ricerca. Poi compongo un’immagine in digitale, esploro forme e colori ed elaboro le dimensioni. Non appena il mio schizzo si materializza sulla tela, posso iniziare a scegliere i materiali. Lavorare e ricamare una tela così grande richiede molto tempo. Tutto viene fatto a mano. “Un monaco medievale nel 23° secolo”. Il vecchio in una forma nuova. Evito le tecniche tradizionali come il punto croce e il ricamo, ma cerco di creare profondità con i fili, attraverso la direzione e la luminosità. Ma il punto critico del mio lavoro è il tempo. Tecniche automatizzate come la tessitura o il tufting comportano la perdita di consistenza, colore o scioltezza. Il tempo è essenziale per il valore artistico del mio lavoro, ma il tempo necessario per creare l’opera è considerevole. La ricerca e la combinazione di materiali per inventare le mie tecniche è fondamentale ed è una parte essenziale del mio lavoro.

Everybody needs a Hero – G.M vero pioniere antartico GM 40 x 30 cm ricamo e pelle, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade “new Dino”, ricamo e pelle, paillettes, fibre acriliche, 130 x 140 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

C’è un’opera o una serie che ha segnato un punto di svolta nel tuo percorso di crescita professionale?

Credo che sia stato durante la realizzazione della mia opera Children of St. Kilda (2013) che mi è venuto in mente che potevo trasmettere il mio messaggio con la fotografia e il disegno, e che potevo passare al livello successivo con il tessuto e il filo. In quel momento ho capito che questa sarebbe stata la mia scelta di materiali. Negli anni Trenta del secolo scorso ci fu un’epidemia di influenza sulla remota isola di St. Kilda (Hirta), nelle Ebridi Esterne. Era difficilmente accessibile a causa delle dure condizioni climatiche e delle maree tempestose. Invece di aiutare la popolazione con medicine e comunicazioni, il governo britannico evacuò tutti. Si pensava di trasformare l’isola in una base navale, ma alla fine non se ne fece nulla. Questo pose fine a 2000 anni di vita autarchica unica nel suo genere. Si trattava di una cultura e di un artigianato eccezionali, con il miglior tweed del mondo. Questo ha dato il via al mio omaggio agli abitanti di St. Kilda, e l’uso dei tessuti mi ha permesso di mostrare loro il mio rispetto.

The Children of St. Kilda, ricamo, 75 x 385 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

La serie People With The Yellow Ear è uno dei tuoi lavori più recenti. Qual è il tema conduttore di questa serie di ritratti?

All’inizio del periodo COVID, ci sono stati questi orribili eventi tra la polizia statunitense e George Floyd, e l’aumento delle proteste di Black Lives Matter. Perché non riusciamo a capire che esiste una sola razza: la razza umana? Questa è una citazione di Rosa Parks. Ho pensato che fosse ripugnante che nel 2020 stessimo ancora combattendo contro il razzismo. Così ho iniziato a comporre ritratti di etnie miste, ad esempio 33% scozzese; 33% azero; 34% fuegino. Ci sono ritratti più piccoli (40×30 cm) e più grandi (150×120 cm). Hanno tutti un orecchio giallo e una linea gialla verticale sul viso, perché sono tutti la mia famiglia. Abitano sull’Isola di Chuckacaba, dove l’empatia è la nuova politica.

PWTYE #22. BIG 150 x 120 cm composed portrait. The last big one from the series People with the yellow ear. Composed portrait 34% Sudanese 33% Dutch 33% Palestine. Wool Cotton Silk Leather and Bark. 2022 copyright Preta Wolzak
People with the yellow ear #20. Un ritratto compost da 33% Scottish 33% Azerbaijani 34% Fuegians. Ricamo a mano e pelle. BIG 150 x 120 cm. 2022, copyright Preta Wolzak
People with the yellow ear # 2. Dall’isola di Chuckacaba. Questa ragazza è 33% Islandic, 33% Brasilian, 34% Ivorian. 40 x 30 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak
People with the yellow ear #11. Dall’isola di Chuckacaba. Questa donna è: 33% Kenian, 33% Irish, 34% Greek. 40 x 30 cm, copyright Preta Wolzak

Come sono cambiate le tue opere nel tempo, dai primi lavori a oggi?

Sono costantemente alla ricerca di materiali e tecniche. Sperimento sempre: posso creare la mia passamaneria, posso usare altri supporti oltre alla pelle o alla tela? Mi piace sfruttare gli errori o gli insuccessi, ad esempio i buchi nel lavoro a maglia. In questo momento sono affascinata da corde e cortecce. E sto tornando a dipingere per poi tirare i fili attraverso la tela. Le mie tecniche si evolvono mentre lavoro. La mia cassetta degli attrezzi assomiglia sempre più a un tavolo da pittore ed il modo in cui lavoro sulle tele assomiglia al modo in cui lavora un pittore.

Arctic Charade #Endurance. Ricamo in corda di pelle, fibre acriliche e paillettes. 125 x 170 cm 2022, copyright Preta Wolzak
Arctic Charade White, paillettes, ricamo su seta, acrilici 140 x 140 cm. Quest'opera fa parte della collezione d'arte Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, copyright Preta Wolzak
Greetings from mister Sunapee, 85 x 120 cm, ricamo (filo grosso-painting) disegno a matita, acrilico su tela, copyright Preta Wolzak
Bubu est Magnifique, 120 x 100 cm ricamo con acrilico su tela (yarnpainting) (Missoni collection), copyright Preta Wolzak

Dal 4 giugno al 17 luglio si è tenuta la mostra bi-personale: Preta Wolzak and Pieter W. Postma: Twice As Nice And Nowhere To Hide. Raccontaci di questa mostra, di come è nato questo progetto. In che modo le tue opere dialogano con quelle di Pieter?

La mostra con Pieter W Postma è nata dal fatto che siamo entrambi narratori di storie, con un’attenzione particolare alle questioni sociali. E lavoriamo entrambi con un’ampia gamma di materiali come pelle, legno, tessuti e metallo. Credo che sia importante entrare in contatto con altri artisti. Il mondo dell’arte è densamente popolato da individualisti, ma connettersi con altre opere d’arte e con la persona che ti sta dietro ti rende più forte.

Duo exhibition Twice as nice and nowhere to hide, copyright Preta Wolzak

Progetti futuri?

Al momento sto dedicando la maggior parte del mio tempo a fare ricerche per la mia nuova serie sugli scienziati. Scienziati che in vita non hanno ottenuto il giusto riconoscimento per il loro lavoro, a causa di ostacoli e ingiustizie di ogni tipo. Ma che in realtà erano dei geni. Persone come Srinivasa Ramanujan e Alan Turing. Alcuni sono stati scartati perché neri o gay. Ma il discorso potrebbe cambiare, perché ora mi sto occupando anche degli eroi della Verità, ovvero i fondatori di Bellincat. Oltre a diverse fiere d’arte a cui ho intenzione di partecipare, come Art The Hague e PAN Amsterdam, non vedo l’ora di partecipare a una mostra collettiva di arte tessile nel nuovo museo olandese MOYA, nell’ottobre 2022.

Maria Rosaria Roseo

English version Dopo una laurea in giurisprudenza e un’esperienza come coautrice di testi giuridici, ho scelto di dedicarmi all’attività di famiglia, che mi ha permesso di conciliare gli impegni lavorativi con quelli familiari di mamma. Nel 2013, per caso, ho conosciuto il quilting frequentando un corso. La passione per l’arte, soprattutto l’arte contemporanea, mi ha avvicinato sempre di più al settore dell’arte tessile che negli anni è diventata una vera e propria passione. Oggi dedico con entusiasmo parte del mio tempo al progetto di Emanuela D’Amico: ArteMorbida, grazie al quale, posso unire il piacere della scrittura al desiderio di contribuire, insieme a preziose collaborazioni, alla diffusione della conoscenza delle arti tessili e di raccontarne passato e presente attraverso gli occhi di alcuni dei più noti artisti tessili del panorama italiano e internazionale.