Events

Shanduko

*Featured photo: Wilfred Timire, Mabhiridha, 2022, tapestry, 206 x 376 cm. Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

OSART GALLERY

Linnet Rubaya, Franklyn Dzingai, Mostaff Muchawaya, Wilfred Timire
Curated by Richard Mudariki

Opening Day: 16 June 5 p.m. – 9 p.m.
June 16, 2022 – September 24, 2022
Osart Gallery, Corso Plebisciti 12, 20129 Milano

Shanduko (to change/morph in Shona) is a group exhibition, curated by Richard Mudariki and devoted to four contemporary Zimbabwean visual artists: Linnet Rubaya, Franklyn Dzingai, Mostaff Muchawaya, and Wilfred Timire. The exhibition portrays the artists employing different materials and concepts in the creation of a visual way of shaking and shifting the conventional media and, at the same time, keeping a particular focus on representation, memory, and cultural identity.

“The subtle disruption of the traditional art canon by artists from Zimbabwe,” writes Richard Mudariki in the critical text of the exhibition, “has generally had a positive global reception, serving as a catalyst in drawing the world’s attention to the diverse art practices in the landlocked southern African nation”. Moreover, “artists finding themselves in a stressful socioeconomic and geographic space punctuated by acute shortages, have resolved to innovate and improvise on materials, turning to alternatives, existing within their immediate environment”, Mudariki says. Interweaving and sewing, besides painting and recycled materials, are recurrent elements. The curator notes that, curiously, differently from the neighboring countries, Zimbabwe does not have a distinct national dress, even if cheap fabrics can be found easily in the local market, as in the rest of the world. Perhaps, the lack of a uniform and the strong presence of found fabrics could have been a sprint for the Zimbabwean artists toward using textiles, assigning identity and new meanings to the material.

Dzingai, Timire, and Muchawaya, living in Zimbabwe, have used in their works embroidery, fabrics, and other materials recovered in different areas. Whereas, Leeds-based Rubaya works with painting, silhouetting black figures on vibrant backgrounds. Rubaya narrates the multicultural British reality, celebrating people involved, like her, in the African diaspora. In the art of all the four artists, the main character is the human: works are often intimate portraits dedicated to the family or friends. In Muchuwaya art, the subjects come alive through the material painting, supported by heterogeneous elements. He always looks towards his native land and the farm in which he grew up, in the mountain area of Nyazura, in the East of Zimbabwe.

Dzingai and Timire have shared the 2021 artHARARE Africa First art prize. The former is a mixed media artist who collages flat blocks of prints with various other picture elements extracted from newspapers, magazines, tabloids, books, and his family photo archive. While the latter mainly uses packaging materials, weaving them into tapestries, depicting everyday life situations and experiences.

In the displayed artworks, the main topics are the individual and everyday lives, discussed through diverse artistic techniques. As they are the innovators of the art scene in Zimbabwe, Timire, Tzingai, Muchawaya,  and Rubaya, have reflected in an original way on their language, never forgetting the memory and roots themes. They form part of an exciting creative scene, attracting worldwide attention.

Richard Mudariki (b. 1985) after first training as an Archaeologist, devoted himself full-time to painting. He is one of the founders of ArtHARARE Contemporary art fair, a platform that brings together selected artworks presented by emerging, mid-career and established contemporary visual artists, as well as curators, artist collectives and arts organisations. This unique space aims to be a dynamic platform that is engaged in contemporary dialogue and exchange with the African and international art community.

Franklyn Dzingai, Afternoon photoshoot, 2021 cardprint and collage on Fabriano, 139,5 x 235 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

Text by Richard Mudariki and Barnabas Ticha Muvhuti (c. 2022)

Shanduko (to change/morph) is a group exhibition by four Zimbabwean visual artists at Osart Gallery in Milan. The exhibition highlights the emerging artists’ different use of diverse materials and concepts in creating visual expressions, as a way of shaking and shifting the conventional practice by introducing new elements and considering other forms. The title of the exhibition denotes change which can be seen as positive or negative, and as such can either be embraced or resisted. Interestingly, the subtle disruption of the traditional art canon by artists from Zimbabwe has generally had a positive global reception, serving as a catalyst in drawing the world’s attention to the diverse art practices in the landlocked southern African nation. Curated by artist Richard Mudariki, Shanduko showcases artworks by Franklyn Dzingai, Wilfred Timire, Linnet Rubaya and Mostaff Muchawaya

Of the four artists in this show, the Harare-born, Leeds-based Rubaya is a painter whose distinct practice is dedicated to the everyday lives of Black people encountered in the multicultural British cities, individuals whose heritage can be traced to the [not so] Great Britain’s former colonies. The Kwekwe-born Dzingai is a recipient of the 2021 artHARARE Africa First art prize. He is a mixed media artist who collages flat blocks of prints with various other picture elements extracted from newspapers, magazines, tabloids, books, and his family photo archive. For the Makoni-born Muchawaya who works with textiles and paint creating layered brightly coloured works, embroidery is a form of painting. The artist depicts people who are close to him. Based in Harare is Timire who completes this quartet. The second recipient of the 2021 artHARARE Africa First art prize, Timire, who observes and documents his surroundings, works with packaging material weaving it into tapestries depicting his lived mundane experiences.

The tendency to link the use of non-conventional art materials like textiles, packaging material, and various found objects to Zimbabwe’s persistent economic challenges is a narrative that is oft repeated and is inherent in the public domain. It is valid. By virtue of the artists finding themselves in a stressful socioeconomic and geographic space punctuated by acute shortages, they have resolved to innovate and improvise on materials, turning to alternatives existing within their immediate environment. The glaring shift in materiality is usually accompanied by sound conceptual frameworks as the artists do not just make art for art’s sake. However, the nation’s socioeconomic stress is not the only factor pushing the artists to resort to alternatives. Some do so because they find purpose in transforming fabrics which have undergone a lifecycle, accumulating meaning at various stages of that cycle. Others turn to them because they are the best communication media for conveying a particular meaning. While some are obsessed with the idea of stretching the lifespan of objects, others use them because they are the heirs of artistic lineages they will not turn their backs on.

Despite the recent political posturing in search for a national dress by the nation’s rulers, Zimbabwe does not have one. Neither does it have distinct designs for particular ethnic groups as seen in neighbouring countries. However, identifiable dresses are common for religious sects like the white robes adorned by the apostolic churches and those worn by performing masquerades (zvigure). Nonetheless, there is the red, white, yellow and black retso cloth worn for traditional ceremonies and mbikiza skirts in dances. Because it is a revered dress serving a ritualistic purpose, retso is not worn on the streets every day. For a nation without a distinct national dress, it is amazing that a significant number of Zimbabwean artists have turned to using textiles, even assigning identity to the material. That the resource is readily available, considering that the local market is heavily flooded with cheap fabrics imported from Asia, could also be a factor influencing local artists to work with them.

Be it in Rubaya’s paintings or in the other three artists’ mixed media works, what comes out strongly is the emphasis on figuration of the human form. Most of the works fit within the realm of portraiture, as they almost imitate photography. For some of the works, the depicted beings are members of the immediate family or friends. The artists take time to document and carefully present their figures in a respectful and dignified manner. While the body of work in this exhibition documents the daily activities of people of African heritage, Rubaya’s matte, ultra-dark skin figures stand out. Her painting style is an amalgamation of different elements derived from the figuration produced by Kerry James Marshall, Barkley L. Hendricks, and Amy Sherald, artists whose oeuvre reflectively affirm Blackness.

If the feminist artists of the 1970s, whose practices encompassed weavings, embroideries tapestries, and many other realms, managed to push the medium and the boundaries, challenging the distinction between textiles and fine art in other parts of the world, what can be said of these contemporary Zimbabwean artists? If Marcel Duchamp and Europe’s modernists of the early 1900s did upset the canon indeed, why are we saying the work coming out of Zimbabwe signals change? For a nation whose mainstream practice was its modern stone sculpture, and painting to an extent, lately Zimbabwe’s contemporary scene has been dominated by artists working with found materials and exploring other avenues like printmaking and embroidery. Dzingai, Timire and Muchawaya are part of this conceptual movement. While these practices may be ordinary in other corners of the world, they are certainly transforming the local arts scene in the country now while managing to grab the world’s attention.

Mostaff Muchawaya, Untitled, 2021 mixed media on canvas, 178 x 160 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

Bio

Mostaff Muchawaya was born in 1981 in Nyazura, Manicaland, Zimbabwe, and currently lives and works in Harare, Zimbabwe. He attended the National Gallery of Zimbabwe School of Visual Arts and Design from 2002 to 2003. Muchawaya references a deep connection to his experiences, which are inseparable from ‘his people and his surroundings. The artist grew up in the province of Manicaland, located in the mountainous East area of Zimbabwe. He continuously refers back to his rural upbringing – his family was part of the workforce on a white-owned farm. Muchawaya’s interest in the arts started at a young age, from making his own clay toys to making sketches of the farmers’ dogs.  Muchawaya has exhibited in several exhibitions, including ‘Memory / Ndangariro’, a solo exhibition at SMAC Gallery in Cape Town (South Africa: 2017); ‘Landmark’ at Gallery Delta in Harare (Zimbabwe: 2016); ‘Mharidzo’ and ‘Zimbabwe Meets Italy’ at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe in Harare (Zimbabwe: 2015 and 2018, respectively); and ‘My Entire People and Places,’ a solo exhibition at Alliance Francaise in Harare that was held in collaboration with Village Unhu (Zimbabwe: 2013). Mostaff Muchawaya’s works are featured in the Zeitz MOCAA exhibition, Five Bhobh – Painting at the End of an Era (2018 – 2019).

Linnet Rubaya, Someone to watch my back, 2022 acrylic on canvas, 90 x 75 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist

Winner of the Saul Hay emerging artist award (2021), Linnet Panashe Rubaya (b. 1991, Harare, Zimbabwe) is a self-taught British-Zimbabwean figurative artist based in Leeds. Born in Harare and raised in London, Rubaya studied Biomedical Science (BSc) at the University of Brighton and moved to Leeds to work as a Software Test Analyst. The Black female identity along with the diverse multiethnic and multicultural melting pot of London is central to Linnet’s practice as she draws from her experiences and conversations to create predominantly acrylic paintings that emanate relatability and radiate emotional and intimate engagement with otherwise marginalised Black subjects. Rubaya’s works aim to inspire, empower and educate observers: “You are important, and your story is important. Your story means you choose the tone and invent the language you use to say who you are and what you mean. But you are not just your story, you are your potential fulfilled.” Linnet’s geographical, literary and creative influences stretch across multiple perspectives. She builds on the figurative work produced by Kerry James Marshall and Barkley L Hendricks, and Amy Sherald, creating a style that is distinct and uniquely hers. Artists and cinematographers such as Alma Thomas, Zhao Xiaoding, and Christopher Doyle have influenced her use of colour as language. Deviating from her earlier work, Linnet has sought to depict the vibrancy and beauty of the world despite the expectation of misery. Her work echoes Alma Thomas, who stated, “Through colour, I have sought to concentrate on beauty and happiness rather than man’s inhumanity to man.” Linnet has been shortlisted for several awards including UK Young Artist of the Year (2019) (now known as UK New Artist of the Year), Bridgman Studio Award (2019), and Art Harare Africa First Prize (2020).

Franklyn Dzingai, Terry Barber - Freedom Cut, 2021 mixed media on canvas, 187 x 220 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

Franklyn Dzingai was born in 1988 in Kwekwe, Zimbabwe, and is currently working in Harare. Recently, he was a recipient of the 2021 ArtHARARE Africa First art prize. In 2009 he started his fine art studies at the National Gallery of Zimbabwe Visual Art Studio in Harare and finished in 2011 with a focus on printmaking. He often incorporates Collage and drawing into his prints, typically characterized by vibrant colour. He sources his images from books, magazines, newspapers, and family photos. Themes such as social interactions and personal memories are typical in his prints. Dzingai is one of the few artists in Zimbabwe who focuses on printmaking and has perfected the cardboard printing method. That led him to win many awards at various shows and exhibitions in Harare.

Wilfred Timire works and lives in Harare. He won the first prize in ArtHARARE 2021. Timire art expression stands from deep analysis and research of his surroundings, highlighted by his tendency to assemble fund elements like packaging materials and weave them into a tapestry to express everyday life experiences.

Moreover, the combination of recycled materials, embroidery, and sewing provides him a place in the lately Zimbabwean contemporary scene. In 2020, he was part of the group exhibition Artists in the Stream X at Gallery Delta in Harare. Indeed, till now, he was only exhibited in his native land.

Eventi

Shanduko

*Foto in evidenza: Wilfred Timire, Mabhiridha, 2022, tapestry, 206 x 376 cm. Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

OSART GALLERY

Linnet Rubaya, Franklyn Dzingai, Mostaff Muchawaya, Wilfred Timire
A cura di Richard Mudariki

Opening day: 16 giugno 2022 17.00 – 21.00
16 giugno 2022 – 24 settembre 2022
Osart Gallery, Corso Plebisciti 12, 20129 Milano

 

Curata da Richard Mudariki, SHANDUKO (cambiare, modificare in shona) è la collettiva dedicata a quattro artisiti visivi dello Zimbabwe: Linnet Rubaya, Franklyn Dzingai, Mostaff Muchawaya e Wilfred Timire. La mostra sottolinea come gli artisti emergenti sperimentino tecniche innovative nei loro lavori, facendo slittare e trasformando il senso dei media tradizionali, mantenendo un’attenzione particolare verso la figurazione e il tema della memoria e dell’identità culturale.

“La sottile distruzione dei mezzi tradizionali messa in atto dagli artisti dello Zimbabwe”, scrive Richard Mudariki nel testo critico della mostra, “sta ricevendo un buon riscontro internazionale, diventando un catalizzatore per le numerose pratiche artistiche che prendono vita in questa terra senza sbocchi sul mare”.  Inoltre, argomenta Mudariki, “gli artisti che si sono trovati in condizioni socioeconomiche complesse, e in territori caratterizzati da gravi carenze, sono riusciti a trasformare linguaggio e metodologia, mettendo in atto virtuose improvvisazioni sul fronte dei materiali utilizzati, e cercando valide alternative, che potessero coesistere con l’ambiente in cui si trovavano”. L’intreccio e la cucitura, oltre alla pittura e all’utilizzo di materiali di recupero, sono elementi ricorrenti nel loro lavoro; il curatore nota che curiosamente in Zimbabwe, al contrario di quanto accade nei paesi limitrofi, non esiste un unico abito tradizionale nazionale, mentre i materiali tessili di basso costo sono molto abbondanti, come in altre parti del mondo. Forse, la carenza di una “divisa” e la forte presenza di tessuti di scarto hanno spinto gli artisti a includere questi ultimi nelle loro opere, dando loro nuovi significati.

Dzingai, Timire e Muchawaya, che vivono in Zimbabwe, hanno impiegato nei loro lavori il ricamo, la stoffa, e altri materiali di scarto, recuperati da ambiti diversi. Al contrario, Rubaya, che oggi vive a Leeds, lavora con la pittura, stagliando le sue figure nere su sfondi vivaci e raccontando così la realtà multietnica delle città inglesi, celebrando le persone coinvolte, come lei, nella diaspora africana. Nel lavoro di tutti e quattro gli artisti il soggetto principale è l’uomo: le loro opere, infatti, sono spesso ritratti intimi, dedicati a familiari e amici. Nell’opera di Muchuwaya i soggetti sono trattati attraverso una pittura materica, che include materiali eterogenei. Egli guarda continuamente alla sua terra d’origine, la zona montuosa di Nyazura, nell’est del paese, dove si trovava l’azienda agricola in cui è cresciuto.

Dzingai e Timire hanno condiviso il primo premio ArtHARARE Africa, nel 2021. Il primo, a partire dalla profonda ricerca condotta sulle tecniche di stampa, crea collage in cui unisce pittura, stampe, riviste, e fotografie, spesso provenienti dal suo archivio familiare. Timire, invece, utilizza prevalentemente materiali da imballo, che cuce dando forma a veri e propri arazzi, in cui rappresenta situazioni e figure del quotidiano.

Nelle opere in mostra, i temi principali sono l’individuo e la sua vita quotidiana, affrontati attraverso una molteplicità di tecniche diverse. Tra gli innovatori della scena artistica dello Zimbabwe, Timire, Tzingai,  Muchawaya e Rubaya, hanno riflettuto in modo originale sul proprio linguaggio, senza mai tralasciare i temi della memoria e delle radici. Essi fanno parte di una scena creativa estremamente vivace, a cui tutto il mondo sta dedicando una rinnovata attenzione.

Richard Mudariki, dopo aver studiato archeologia, si è dedicato alla pittura a tempo pieno. È uno dei fondatori di ArtHARARE Contemporary art fair, una piattaforma che riunisce una selezione di opere presentate da artisti emergenti e affermati, oltre che da curatori, collettivi artistici e organizzazioni. La fiera mira ad essere una piattaforma dinamica, che metta in dialogo la comunità artistica locale e internazionale

Franklyn Dzingai, Afternoon photoshoot, 2021 cardprint and collage on Fabriano, 139,5 x 235 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

Testo di Richard Mudariki e Barnabas Ticha Muvhuti (2022 ca)

Shanduko (cambiare, modificare) è una mostra collettiva dedicata a quattro artisiti visivi dello Zimbabwe presso Osart Gallery, a Milano. La mostra sottolinea come gli artisti emergenti usino materiali e concetti eterogenei nel dare forma alle loro espressioni visive, facendo slittare e scuotendo le pratiche convenzionali attraverso l’introduzione di nuovi elementi e forme al’interno dei loro lavori. Il titolo della mostra indica un cambiamento che è già in atto, che può essere visto come un fattore positivo o negativo, e come tale può essere condiviso o rigettato. È interessante che la sottile distruzione dei mezzi tradizionali messa in atto dagli artisti dello Zimbabwe stia ricevendo un buon riscontro internazionale, diventando un catalizzatore verso le numerose pratiche artistiche che prendono vita in questa terra senza sbocchi sul mare. Shanduko, curata da Richard Mudariki, include le opere di Franklyn Dzingai, Wilfred Timire, Linnet Rubaya e Mostaff Muchawaya.

Dei quattro artisti in mostra, Rubaya, nata ad Harare e residente a Leeds, è una pittrice la cui pratica è dedicata alla vita quotidiana delle persone di colore incontrate nelle multiculturali città inglesi, persone che spesso hanno le radici nei territori che erano stati colonie della [non così] “Gran” Bretagna. Dzingai, nato a Kwekwe, è stato uno dei vincitori del premio ArtHARARE Africa, nel 2021. L’artista combina tecniche diverse, creando collage in cui unisce stampe da libri e riviste, oltre alle immagini desunte dall’archivio fotografico familiare. Per Muchawaya, nato a Makoni, il ricamo è una forma di pittura; egli infatti combina tessuto e pittura creando opere stratificate e vivaci. L’artista che completa il quartetto, Timire, lavora ad Harare, ed è stato premiato insieme a Dzingai in occasione di ArtHARARE Africa, nel 2021. Timire osserva e documenta ciò che lo circonda, utilizzando materiali da imballo, che cuce rendendoli veri e propri arazzi in cui rappresenta situazioni quotidiane.

Vi è una tendenza a mettere in relazione le continue sfide economiche affrontate dallo Zimbabwe e l’uso, da parte degli artisti, di materiali non convenzionali, tra cui stoffe, imballi, oggetti trovati. Tale interpretazione, ormai di pubblico dominio, rimane valida. Gli artisti che si sono trovati in condizioni socioeconomiche complesse e in territori caratterizzati da gravi carenze, sono riusciti a trasformare linguaggio e metodologia, mettendo in atto virtuose improvvisazioni sul fronte dei materiali utilizzati, cercando alternative valide che potessero coesistere con l’ambiente in cui si trovavano. Tale spostamento relativo ai materiali è accompagnato da una eloquente cornice concettuale, dal momento che gli artisti non fanno arte solamente per amore dell’arte. In ogni caso, la crisi socioeconomica della nazione non è l’unico fattore che ha spinto gli artisti a cercare delle alternative. In alcuni casi essi recuperano oggetti di scarto, che sembrano aver concluso il loro ciclo di vita, e hanno accumulato significati diversi durante il percorso. In altri casi l’uso di tali materiali risulta il miglior mezzo comunicativo per ciò che si vuole esprimere. Se alcuni sembrano ossessionati dalla possibilità di prolungare la vita degli oggetti, altri includono attraverso di essi un’eredità a cui non vogliono voltare le spalle.

Nonostante la ricerca di una divisa che fosse adottata dal governo, lo Zimbabwe non ne ha mai adottata una. Il paese non prevede nemmeno una distinzione di abiti tra i diversi gruppi etnici, come accade invece in paesi vicini. Esistono invece abiti ben definiti per quanto riguarda i gruppi religiosi – la tunica bianca per le chiese apostoliche, o l’abito tradizionale indossato dagli “zvigure”. Esistono inoltre i tessuti “retso” rossi, bianchi, gialli e neri, indossati per le cerimonie tradizionali, e gonne “mbikiza” per le danze. Essendo il retso utilizzato unicamente durante le cerimonie, esso non viene visto abitualmente per strada. Per una nazione che non ha un abito tradizionale in cui riconoscersi, è significativo che molti artisti locali abbiano incluso la stoffa nel loro lavoro, dando ad essa un nuovo valore identitario. Uno dei fattori che probabilmente ha portato gli artisti a lavorare con i tessuti, soffermandosi sul loro valore metaforico, è il fatto che essi siano abbondantemente disponibili, dal momento che il mercato locale è inondato da tessuti a basso costo importati dall’Asia.

Un elemento che caratterizza i dipinti di Rubaya e le opere multimateriche degli altri artisti è l’attenzione verso la rappresentazione della figura umana. Molti dei lavori sono riconducibili al genere del ritratto, e in alcuni casi tendono a imitare la fotografia. Spesso i soggetti raffigurati sono membri della famiglia più stretta o amici degli artisti, che si concedono tutto il tempo necessario per darne una rappresentazione nobilitata. Mentre la selezione di opere esposte raffigura le attività quotidiane delle persone di origine africana, le figure nere di Rubaya emergono, distaccandosi dal contesto. Il suo stile pittorico nasce dall’unione di elementi desunti dalla pittura di artisti come Kerry James Marshall, Barkley L. Hendricks e Amy Sherald, i cui lavori sono effettivamente una potente affermazione della “Blackness”.

Se le artiste femministe degli anni Settanta, la cui pratica includeva, tra le altre cose, la cucitura e il ricamo, avevano sondato i limiti del medium, avevano sfidato il confine tra le cosidette belle arti e il tessile, cosa possiamo dire degli artisti dello Zimbabwe oggi? Se Marcel Duchamp e gli artisti modernisti europei all’inizio del Novecento avevano ribaltato i canoni, come mai oggi si segnala una cesura, un cambiamento in atto tra gli artisti dello Zimbabwe? Per una nazione la cui arte riconosciuta a livello istituzionale consiste nella scultura in pietra, e in parte con la pittura, la trasformazione in atto fa sì che molti protagonisti della scena contemporanea lavorino con materiali di recupero ed esplorino nuove strade, come la stampa e il cucito. Dzingai, Timire e Muchawaya sono parte di questo movimento. Se questa attenzione verso la commistione di materiali e il rovesciamento delle tecniche tradizionali può apparire scontata in altre zone del mondo, in Zimbabwe assume un’importanza particolare, dando nuovo impulso alla vivace scena artistica locale, che oggi è oggetto di grande attenzione da parte di un pubblico internazionale.

Mostaff Muchawaya, Untitled, 2021 mixed media on canvas, 178 x 160 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

Bio

Mostaff Muchawaya è nato nel 1981 a Nyazura, Manicaland, in una zona montuosa a est dello Zimbabwe. Vive e lavora ad Harare. Si è formato presso la National Gallery of Zimbabwe School of Visual Arts and Design dal 2002 al 2003.

Muchawaya fa riferimento alla profonda connessione con le sue esperienze personali e la sua eredità culturale, inscindibili dalla “sua gente” e dal contesto. L’interesse per l’arte è nato quando l’artisa era molto giovane e fabbricava da solo i giochi in argilla o ritraeva i cani della fattoria in cui era cresciuto. Nella sua opera, fa riferimenti continui alla sua formazione rurale.

Muchawaya ha preso parte a numerose esposizioni, tra cui ‘Memory / Ndangariro’, una mostra personale presso SMAC Gallery a Cape Town (Sudafrica: 2017); ‘Landmark’ presso Gallery Delta ad Harare (Zimbabwe: 2016); ‘Mharidzo’ e ‘Zimbabwe Meets Italy’ alla National Gallery of Zimbabwe di Harare (Zimbabwe: 2015 and 2018, respectively), ‘My Entire People and Places,’ personale presso Alliance Francaise ad Harare, organizzata in collaborazione con Village Unhu (Zimbabwe: 2013). Le opere di Mostaff Muchawaya erano parte della mostra Five Bhobh – Painting at the End of an Era (2018 – 2019) presso lo ZEITZ MOCAA di Cape Town.

Linnet Rubaya, Someone to watch my back, 2022 acrylic on canvas, 90 x 75 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist

Linnet Panashe Rubaya è un’artista autodidatta, vincitrice del premio Saul Hay per artisti emergenti. Nata ad Harare, Zimbabwe, nel 1991, e cresciuta a Londra, ha studiato Scienze Biomediche all’Università di Brighton. Ora vive e lavora a Leeds, nel Regno Unito. L’identità della donna di colore, insieme alla commistione culturale presente a Londra, sono elementi centrali nella ricerca di Linnet, che punta a dare nuova visibilità a soggetti altrimenti marginalizzati. Nelle sue opere pittoriche, le campiture colorate stese con i colori acrilici incoraggiano lo spettatore a entrare in relazione con i soggetti rappresentati. Il lavoro di Rubaya mira a essere fonte di ispirazione e crescita, restituendo forza ai soggetti: “Tu sei importante, e la tua storia è importante. La tua storia ti permette di reinventare il modo in cui ti poni e in cui trasmetti ciò che desideri. Ma tu non sei solo la tua storia, sei anche l’insieme delle potenzialità raggiunte”.

Le influenze geografiche, letterarie e visive di Linnet si dispiegano lungo prospettive molteplici; si colgono i riferimenti al lavoro di Kerry James Marshall, Barkley L Hendricks e Amy Sherald, attraverso i quali l’artista è giunta a uno stile assolutamente personale. Artisti e registi come Alma Thomas, Zhao Xiaoding e Christopher Doyle hanno altresì influenzato il suo uso del colore.

Prendendo una direzione diversa da quella iniziale, Linnet è arrivata a catturare la bellezza e le vibrazioni del mondo circostante, nonostante le problematiche che lo affliggono. Nel suo lavoro risuona l’affermazione di Alma Thomas: “Attraverso il colore, ho cercato di concentrarmi sulla bellezza e sulla felicità, piuttosto che sulla disumanità dell’uomo verso i suoi simili”. Linnet è stata candidata finalista in occasione di diversi premi, tra cui “UK Young Artist of the Year” (2019) (ora conosciuto come “UK New Artist of the Year”), “Bridgman Studio Award” (2019), e “Art Harare Africa First Prize” (2020).

Franklyn Dzingai, Terry Barber - Freedom Cut, 2021 mixed media on canvas, 187 x 220 cm Courtesy Osart Gallery and the artist, photo Max Pescio

Franklyn Dzingai è nato a Kwekwe, Zimbabwe, nel 1988, e oggi lavora ad Harare. Nel 2021 è stato vincitore del premio ArtHARARE Africa. Nel 2009 ha iniziato il suo percorso di formazione presso il National Gallery of Zimbabwe Art Studio, specializzandosi nel 2011 nelle tecniche di stampa. Spesso include nel suo lavoro collage e disegni, e le sue stampe sono caratterizzate da colori vivaci. Ricava le sue immagini da libri, riviste, quotidiani e fotografie di famiglia.

Dzingai è uno dei pochi artisti in Zimbabwe ad aver approfondito il tema della stampa; ha sperimentato in particolare l’utilizzo di matrici in cartone nei processi di stampa. Questo tipo di ricerca lo ha portato a vincere diversi premi, soprattutto ad Harare.

Wifred Timire vive e lavora ad Harare. Nel 2021 è stato il vincitore del premio ArtHARARE Africa.

La ricerca artistica di Timire si basa sulla profonda analisi relativa al contesto in cui vive, che si esplica nella tendenza ad assemblare elementi trovati, tra cui materiali da imballo, e a cucirli insieme in arazzi che rappresentano le esperienze del quotidiano. L’uso di materiali di recupero, tra l’altro, fa dell’artista uno degli esponenti delle ricerche artistiche più originali dell’ulltimo periodo in Zimbabwe. Nel 2020, Tmire ha preso parte alla mostra collettiva Artist in the stream X presso la galleria Delta di Harare.

Fino ad oggi, l’artista ha esposto solamente in Zimbabwe.