Interviste

An eclectic artist: Margaret Fabrizio

Fascinating and eclectic artist, Margaret Fabrizio ranges from Music to Entertainment to Fiber Art, achieving brilliant results in all fields in which he ventures.

Pianist, Harpsichordist, Concert Artist, Teacher, Member of the Faculty of Music of Stanford University for 25 years, Composer, Performer, Film Maker, Collage Artist, Painter, Writer, Videographer, Creator of Artist Books, Forest in her land in Sonoma and finally…QUILTER!

Her works are exhibited in Museums, Theatres and Universities.

Her masks, collages, paintings belong to private collections, the installations and living structures of her “Taliesen” (a 40 acre estate in the county of Sonoma in California known as “Cazadero Nature and Art Conservancy”) reveal a multi-faceted personality.

Reading about her and her works introduces us to a dreamlike and phantasmagorical world that captures us and from which it is difficult to detach!

Celebrating 32485 days on this planet – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Ours is a magazine that deals with Textile Art, so I reluctantly focus only on textile works and the questions addressed to Margaret Fabrizio will be limited to her production in this field: Quilts and Kawandis.

There remains the desire to examine the other themes as well, to understand what has moved her choices towards the various areas of his production…

For those who are captivated by the same desire, see the artist’s website, a mine of news and photos and the over a thousand videos on her YouTube channel:

http://www.margaretfabrizio.com
https://www.youtube.com/user/atree3/featured

copyright Margaret Fabrizio

I asked Margaret Fabrizio a few questions:

 

A well known musician and composer, what pushed you to approach quilting?

Cannot remember.  My maternal grandmother was a quilter, but my mother was not.  She was an accomplished seamstress, knitter, crocheter, tailor, but she never made quilts.  One day in 1987 I just decided I wanted to make a quilt, and I began piecing an ‘Ocean Waves’ Quilt.

Oceanwaves – 80 x 108 – 1988 – copyright Margaret-Fabrizio

Your quilts initially explore traditional motifs, made with extreme precision in repeated blocks, then gradually free themselves from schematism and fragment and recompose in an increasingly free way, clearly acquiring an increasingly personal imprint; even the colors, initially sober, over time are enriched with color, can you explain what caused these changes?

It was my friendship with the artist/quilter Grace Earl.   She had been a teacher at the Chicago Art Institute and had a very creative way of quilting.  She was always trying to get me to stretch out from a precise plan, and introduced me to the concept of using a design wall, before doing extensive stitching, so you were able to move small bits around as you wished.

(You Tube video of the unveiling of ocean waves:    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuToKd97jKU )

My Old Asian Clothes – 55 x 70 – 2004 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Kathakali – 2006 – 64 x 74 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Bali – 2008 – 62 x 77 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio.

Ryoanji – 2011 – 64 x 82 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

 Chaos Unchained – 2018 – copyright  Margaret Fabrizio

Although traditional designs still interest me, I like finding ways to alter them creatively.

 Latest Quilt – 44 X 61 –  copyright Margaret Fabrizio

 Latest Quilt – detail – 44 X 61 –  copyright Margaret Fabrizio

And then after making 6 quilts and having a lot of leftover cut pieces I decided to make a piece using just them.  I called it a “Leftover Quilt”    So after that, every 6 quilts I made a Leftover Quilt.  They were very challenging, and forced me to be inventive and problem solve.

Leftovers 1 -1993 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Leftovers 2 -1993 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Leftovers 3 -1993 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

We know that you have travelled a lot in Asia and in particular in India: what made you return several times to these peoples and how their knowledge has changed the way you make Art?

Can you tell us about your meeting with the people of the Siddi and the discovery of their quilts?

I traveled a great deal in India long before I ever saw any of the Siddi quilts.  (Kawandi)          

After going with Joe Cunningham to see a quilt exhibit at the Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco in the summer of 2011, I felt compelled to try to find the women who had created the quilts (kawandi), for they were so completely different in assembly from any quilts I had ever seen.  Careful examination still did not reveal the way in which they had been made. (I was 81)

I learned that these people, the Siddi, are of African descent, and had been brought to India as slaves by the Portuguese 400 years ago.

They still live in relative isolation from the Indian community, castes, and tribals. After much searching I finally found a settlement in the state of Karnataka and spent 2 weeks with the Siddi, on their porches in the forest, taking notes, making videos, and learning the technique.

I returned to San Francisco and created 20 pieces during the following year.  Then I returned to the Siddi in 2012, taking scrap fabrics for their use and four of my pieces for their examination.

The Siddi women were astonished and appreciative at my return the following year.  Their feedback brought me to another level, and I am now making larger pieces.

KAWANDI – Immolation -33x 44 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – In Fuller Bloom – 72 x 58 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Elvis Macarons -32 x 39 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

 KAWANDI – Four Deities – 55 x 42 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Four Roses – 54 x 74 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Green – 55 x 79 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

In recent years you’ve been passionate and dedicated to the creation of kawandi…. what struck you so much about their work and the Siddi people?

This style of quilting is done  completely by hand, using scraps and recycled clothes.  The fabrics I use are largely from India, where I haunt the tailor shops for ‘waste material’,  and recycle clothes.

The main difference is that these quilts are improvised and made completely by hand.  You don’t really know what they are going to look like until they are finished.  There is no planning.  It’s a little like jazz, as compared to the designed quilts which are a little more like Bach.

As for the Siddi…I invite you to watch my video  ‘Kawandi Promo’ and ‘Return to the Siddi’ on my channel  ‘atree3’:  on YouTube, it tells about my travels there:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPtu2ILuw2s&list=PLFuFehKak9t_ZuGPTwxwauwyyglG5RCgC&index=2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnuX8IRW41Y&list=PLFuFehKak9t_ZuGPTwxwauwyyglG5RCgC&index=8

KAWANDI – North and South of the Border – 40 x 49 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – North and South of the Border –  Detail – 40 x 49 –
copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Can you explain to us how a kawandi is created?

‘Kawandi’   is the Konkany word for ‘quilt’.

It is made on an old sari.  They start at a corner, make the little phula (decorative piece without which the quilt is considered naked)  and start down one edge, laying on bits of fabric as they go.  They keep going round and round until they reach the center

Do your kawandi reflect the Siddi tradition or do they differ from it? And, if so, in what?  

Yes and no.  I learned the technique,   and watching them make their choices as to what fabrics and colors to use was a revelation to me,  but I’m not sure that one can ever learn the sensibilities of other cultures.  That bothered me a lot at the beginning;  I would finish a piece, but when I looked at the finished piece it did not have the same visual mystery that I always felt when I looked at their work.  Its a little like watching people trying to imitate the Gee’s Bend quilts.  The copies just don’t have the same magic.  I finally realized that, try as I may,  as skilled in the technique as I might become, my pieces were going to look different, because I am different.  So now I just go my way, little by little my work is evolving.  I am always surprised.

KAWANDI- Om Nama Shivaya – 51 x 61 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Siddi Colors – 46 x 38 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Three Sleeves and a Bodice – 38 x 63 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Thrissur Frames – 41 X 53 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Tribal Swirl – 33 x 463 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Water– 80 x 80 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

What are your future projects?

 My immediate future project is coming to Verona for the quilt festival.   I know that I will not be shown in any of the scheduled venues, but nevertheless, I am planning on bringing some of my kawandis.  I doubt that there will be any other quilts there made with this technique, so I think some people might be interested in seeing them.  I arrive in Verona a week before the festival opens, so I plan to scout around the city and see what possibilities might arise where I could show them.   Maybe all I need is two trees, a rope, and some clothes pins.  Street Art?  I’m open to any suggestions.

Reading your notes, visiting your facebook and Instagram profiles you feel that you live in close contact with many established artists… what can you tell us about the current trends in Textile Art? how much does it differ today from the intentions and models of traditional quilting?

 I wish I could.  I don’t believe that my work fits in with any of the current trends.  I do not consider my kawandi ‘Art Quilts’, and that seems to  be the main trend these days.   I am just another person trying to assemble whatever fabric I have on hand and see what I might get.  If I had to put a name on my work I would call it ‘Tribal’ .

How would you define your being an Artist?

I have tried to live my life as a work of art.  If everything I do is art…then… I’m not sure I like definitive words like ‘artist’.
Makes me uncomfortable.

 

Thank you for your patience in answering my questions and thank you for letting us know your thoughts more closely!

For further information about Margaret Fabrizio, please refer to the following links:

http://www.margaretfabrizio.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/atree3/featured

https://www.facebook.com/margaret.fabrizio.3

https://www.instagram.com/margaretfabrizio/

Interviste

Un’artista eclettica: Margaret Fabrizio

Artista affascinante ed eclettica,  Margaret Fabrizio spazia dalla Musica allo Spettacolo alla Fiber Art  riuscendo ad ottenere risultati brillanti in tutti i campi in cui si cimenta.

Pianista, Clavicembalista, Concertista, Insegnante, Membro della Facoltà di Musica della Stanford University per 25 anni, Compositrice, Performer, Film Maker, Collage Artist,  Pittrice,  Scrittrice, Videografa, Creatrice di Artist Books, Forestale nella sua terra a Sonoma  ed infine…QUILTER!

Le sue opere sono esposte in Musei, Teatri ed Università.

Le sue maschere, i collage,  i dipinti appartengono a collezioni private, le installazioni e le strutture abitative della sua “Taliesen” (una  tenuta di 40 acri nella contea di Sonoma in California conosciuta come “Cazadero Nature and Art Conservancy”) rivelano una personalità dalle mille sfaccettature.

Leggere di lei e delle sue opere ci introduce in un mondo onirico e fantasmagorico che ci cattura e da cui è difficile staccarsi!

Celebrating 32485 days on this planet – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

La nostra è una rivista che si occupa di Arte Tessile,  pertanto a fatica mi concentro solo sulle opere tessili e le domande rivolte a Margaret Fabrizio si limiteranno  alla sua produzione in tale campo: Quilts e Kawandis.

Rimane la voglia di sviscerare anche gli altri temi, di capire cosa ha mosso le sue scelte verso i vari ambiti della sua produzione

Per chi è catturato dallo stesso  desiderio si rimanda al sito dell’artista, miniera di notizie e foto ed agli oltre mille video presenti sul suo canale YouTube:

http://www.margaretfabrizio.com

https://www.youtube.com/user/atree3/featured

copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Ho rivolto a Margaret Fabrizio alcune domande: 

 Affermata musicista e compositrice, cosa ti ha spinto ad avvicinarti al quilting?
Non mi ricordo.  Mia nonna materna era una quilter  ma mia madre non lo era.  Era una sarta esperta di cucito, maglia, uncinetto, faceva vestiti, ma non ha mai fatto trapunte.  Un giorno, nel 1987, ho deciso che volevo fare un quilt ed ho iniziato a cucire un “Ocean Waves Quilt”.

Oceanwaves – 80 x 108 – 1988 – copyright Margaret-Fabrizio

I tuoi quilt inizialmente esplorano motivi tradizionali, realizzati con estrema precisione in   blocchi ripetuti, poi via via si liberano dallo schematismo e si frammentano e ricompongono in modo sempre più libero acquisendo chiaramente una  impronta sempre più personale; anche le tinte, inizialmente sobrie, nel tempo si arricchiscono di colore, ci puoi spiegare cosa ha provocato questi cambiamenti?

E’ stata  la mia amicizia con l’artista/quilter Grace Earl.   Era  stata insegnante al Chicago Art Institute e aveva un modo molto creativo di fare quilting.  Cercava sempre di farmi allontanare da un pianificazione completamente predefinita,  mi ha insegnato il significato dell’uso di un  design wall ,che permette di posizionare piccoli  pezzi del lavoro finale e di spostarli fino ad ottenere la composizione desiderata e solo dopo unire le varie parti  fra loro.
(You Tube video sulla presentazione di “ocean waves”:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kuToKd97jKU )

My Old Asian Clothes – 55 x 70 – 2004 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Kathakali – 2006 – 64 x 74 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Bali – 2008 – 62 x 77 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio.

Ryoanji – 2011 – 64 x 82 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

 Chaos Unchained – 2018 – copyright  Margaret Fabrizio

Anche se i disegni tradizionali mi interessano ancora, mi piace trovare modi per modificarli in modo creativo.

 Latest Quilt – 44 X 61 –  copyright Margaret Fabrizio

 Latest Quilt – detail – 44 X 61 –  copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Quando, dopo i primi 6 quilts cuciti, mi sono resa conto di  avere  tantissimi pezzi di stoffa avanzati dalla loro lavorazione, ho deciso di fare un pezzo usando solo loro.  L’ho chiamato “Leftover Quilt”, quindi,dopo la prima,  ogni 6 trapunte ho fatto una trapunta con gli avanzi delle precedenti.  Erano molto impegnativi, e mi hanno costretto ad essere inventiva e a risolvere i problemi.

Leftovers 1 -1993 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Leftovers 2 -1993 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Leftovers 3 -1993 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Sappiamo che hai viaggiato molto in Asia e in particolare in India: cosa ti ha fatto tornare più volte presso quei popoli e in quale modo la loro conoscenza ha cambiato il tuo modo di fare Arte?

Ci puoi raccontare il tuo incontro con il popolo dei Siddi e la scoperta delle loro trapunte?

Ho viaggiato molto in India molto prima di vedere una qualsiasi delle trapunte Siddi.  (Kawandi)

Dopo aver visitato con Joe Cunningham una mostra di quilt al Museum of the African Diaspora di San Francisco nell’estate del 2011, mi sono sentita in dovere di cercare le donne che avevano creato le trapunte (kawandi), perché erano assemblate in modo completamente diverso da qualsiasi quilt che avessi mai visto.  Un attento esame non mi aveva ancora rivelato il modo in cui erano state fatte.    (Avevo 81 anni)

Ho appreso che questo popolo, i Siddi, sono di origine africana, e sono stati portati in India come schiavi dai portoghesi 400 anni fa.

Vivono ancora in relativo isolamento dalla comunità indiana, dalle caste e dalle tribù. Dopo molte ricerche ho finalmente trovato un insediamento nello stato del Karnataka e ho trascorso 2 settimane con i Siddi, sui loro portici nella foresta, prendendo appunti, facendo video e imparando dalle loro donne la tecnica dei kawandi.

Sono tornata a San Francisco e ho creato 20 pezzi l’anno successivo.  Poi sono tornato dai Siddi nel 2012, portando  i miei avanzi di lavorazione  per il loro uso e quattro dei miei pezzi per farli esaminare.

Le donne Siddi erano stupite e si sono complimentate al mio ritorno l’anno successivo.  Il loro feedback mi ha portato ad un altro livello, e ora sto facendo pezzi più grandi.

KAWANDI – Immolation -33x 44 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – In Fuller Bloom – 72 x 58 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Elvis Macarons -32 x 39 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

 KAWANDI – Four Deities – 55 x 42 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Four Roses – 54 x 74 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Green – 55 x 79 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Negli ultimi anni ti sei appassionata e dedicata alla creazione di kawandi….cosa ti ha tanto colpito della loro lavorazione e del popolo dei Siddi?

Questo stile di quilting è fatto completamente a mano, utilizzando scraps e vestiti riciclati.  I tessuti che uso provengono in gran parte dall’India, dove frequento i negozi di sartoria per i “materiale di scarto”, e riciclo abiti.

La differenza principale è che queste  trapunte sono improvvisate e fatte completamente a mano.  Non sai davvero come appariranno fino a quando non saranno finite.  Non c’è pianificazione.  E’ un po’ come il jazz, rispetto ai quilts  progettati che assomigliano un po’ di più a Bach.

Per quanto riguarda i Siddi….vi invito a guardare i video ‘Kawandi Promo’ e “Return to the Siddi” sul mio canale ‘atree3’: su YouTube, racconta i miei viaggi lì:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WPtu2ILuw2s&list=PLFuFehKak9t_ZuGPTwxwauwyyglG5RCgC&index=2

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnuX8IRW41Y&list=PLFuFehKak9t_ZuGPTwxwauwyyglG5RCgC&index=8

KAWANDI – North and South of the Border – 40 x 49 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – North and South of the Border –  Detail – 40 x 49 –
copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Ci puoi spiegare come viene creato un kawandi?

Kawandi è la parola Konkany che significa “trapunta”.  E’ cucito  su un vecchio sari. Lavorano sedute per terra. Cominciano da un angolo, fanno la piccola phula (pezzo decorativo senza il quale il quilt è considerato spoglio), partono da un bordo in basso,aggiungendo  pezzi via via dall’esterno verso l’interno.  Continuano a girare in tondo fino a raggiungere il centro.

I tuoi kawandi rispecchiano la tradizione dei Siddi o se  ne differenziano? e, in caso affermativo, in cosa?  

Si’ e no.  Ho imparato la tecnica, e vederli fare le loro scelte su quali tessuti e colori utilizzare è stata per me una rivelazione, ma non sono sicuro che si possa mai imparare la sensibilità di altre culture.  Questo mi ha dato molto fastidio all’inizio; avevo  finito un pezzo, ma quando l’ho guardato non aveva lo stesso mistero visivo che ho sempre provato quando ho visto il loro lavoro.  E’ un po’ come guardare la gente che cerca di imitare le trapunte Gee’sBend.  Le copie non hanno la stessa magia.  Alla fine mi sono reso conto che, per quanto possibile, per quanto io possa diventare abile nella tecnica, i miei pezzi avrebbero avuto un aspetto diverso, perché io sono diversa.  Così ora vado per la mia strada, a poco a poco il mio lavoro si sta evolvendo.  Sono sempre sorpresa.

KAWANDI- Om Nama Shivaya – 51 x 61 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI – Siddi Colors – 46 x 38 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Three Sleeves and a Bodice – 38 x 63 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Thrissur Frames – 41 X 53 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Tribal Swirl – 33 x 463 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

KAWANDI- Water– 80 x 80 – copyright Margaret Fabrizio

Quali sono i tuoi futuri progetti?

Il mio progetto per l’immediato futuro è di venire a Verona per l’evento “Verona Tessile”.   So che non sarò presentata in nessuna delle location in programma, ma ho intenzione di portare un po’ dei miei kawandis.  Dubito che ci saranno altre trapunte realizzate con questa tecnica, quindi penso che alcune persone potrebbero essere interessate a vederle.  Arriverò a Verona una settimana prima dell’apertura del festival, quindi ho intenzione di visitare la città e vedere se vi saranno  possibilità di esporre i miei lavori..   Forse tutto ciò di cui ho bisogno sono due alberi, una corda e delle mollette per vestiti.  Street Art?  Sono aperta a qualsiasi suggerimento.

Leggendo le tue note, visitando i tuoi profili facebook e Instagram si percepisce che vivi a stretto contatto con molti artisti affermati…cosa ci puoi dire delle tendenze attuali per quanto riguarda l’Arte Tessile? quanto essa oggi si discosta dagli intenti e dai modelli del quilting tradizionale?

Vorrei poterlo fare.  Non credo che il mio lavoro si adatti a nessuna delle tendenze attuali.  Non considero i miei  kawandis  ‘Art Quilts’, e questa sembra essere la tendenza principale in questi giorni.   Sono solo un’altra persona che cerca di assemblare qualsiasi tessuto che ha a portata di mano e vedere cosa posso ottenere.  Se dovessi dare un nome al mio lavoro lo chiamerei ‘Tribal’.

 Come definiresti il tuo essere Artista?

Ho cercato di vivere la mia vita come un’opera d’arte.  Se tutto quello che faccio è arte. . .allora . . .non sono sicura che mi piacciono le parole definitive come “artista”

Mi mette a disagio.

Grazie della pazienza con cui hai risposto alle mie domande e grazie di averci fatto conoscere più da vicino il tuo pensiero!

Per approfondire la conoscenza di Margaret Fabrizio si rimanda ai seguenti link:

http://www.margaretfabrizio.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/atree3/featured

https://www.facebook.com/margaret.fabrizio.3

https://www.instagram.com/margaretfabrizio/