Events

The New Bend

*Featured photo: Installation view, THE NEW BEND, Hauser & Wirth, NY. © Photo: Photo Thomas Barrat

3 February– 2 April 2022
Hauser & Wirth New York, 22nd Street

The right to (My) Life,Dawn Williams Boyd, 2017, mixed media, copyright Dawn Williams Boyd, Courtesy of Fort Ganservoort, New York. Photo Ron Witherspoon

Curated by Legacy Russell, Executive Director & Chief Curator of The Kitchen, ‘The New Bend’ brings together 12 contemporary artists working in the raced, classed, and gendered traditions of quilting and textile practice – Anthony Akinbola, Eddie R. Aparicio, Dawn Williams Boyd, Diedrick Brackens, Tuesday Smillie, Tomashi Jackson, Genesis Jerez, Basil Kincaid, Eric N. Mack, Sojourner Truth Parsons, Qualeasha Wood, and Zadie Xa. Their unique visual vernacular exists in tender dialogue with, and in homage to, the contributions of the Gee’s Bend Alabama quilters – Black American women in collective cooperation and creative economic production – and their enduring legacy as a radical meeting place, a prompt, and as intergenerational inspiration. This exhibition acknowledges the work of Gee’s Bend quilters such as Sarah Benning (b. 1933), Missouri Pettway (1902-1981), Lizzie Major (1922-2011), Sally Bennett Jones (1944-1988), Mary Lee Bendolph (b.1935), and so many more, as central to expanded histories of abstraction and modernism.

Forward walking boy on the edge where the sand meets the shore (from DES HOMMES ET DES DIEUX), Eric N. Mack, 2018, © Eric N. Mack, courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery. Photo Prudence Cuming Associates

While the account of Modern Art engages abstraction as a critical tool of experimentation, the narrative as it has been told to-date has not been inclusive of this group and the ways in which they continue to transform art history, visual culture, and cultural production across localities and generations. Intersecting with the 20th anniversary of the groundbreaking exhibition ‘The Quilts at Gee’s Bend’ first presented at The Whitney Museum of Art (2002- 2003), each of the artists featured in ‘The New Bend’ explores this legacy both in their technical approach and formal aesthetic. The abstract and expressive modes of cutting, stitching, splicing, and remixing articulated in this exhibition as queered performative and editorial acts also reframe an understanding of the digital, computational, memetic, and algorithmic. Audrey Bennett, University of Michigan Professor of Art and Design, coined the term ‘heritage algorithms’ in 2016 to denote the goal of ‘not reducing culture to code, but expanding coding to embrace culture.’ In their co-authored essay ‘On Cultural Cyborgs’ (2020), Bennett and her collaborator Ron Eglash, Professor of Information, call to ‘decolonize cybernetics’ as a core component of ethnocomputing. What the quilters of Gee’s Bend reveal via their transformative cooperative work is that they are both artists and technologists, contributing simultaneously to art history, as well as to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) practice. This duality exists in the work of each artist featured in this exhibition and many more beyond who continue to grow in this tradition. Thus, through their practice, the 12 artists on view in ‘The New Bend’ propose electrifying new directions, adding a promising new bend in this journey.

Ctrl-Alt-Del, Qualeasha Wood, 2021, © Qualeasha Wood, courtesy the artist and Gallery Kendra Jayne Patrick. Photo Qualeasha Wood

About Gee’s Bend

The town of Boykin—also known as Gee’s Bend—is an intimate African American community located at the arc of a bend of the Alabama River within Wilcox County, Alabama in the United States. The location was originally named for a landowner and slaveholder of the same surname who in 1816 settled in the area and built a cotton plantation. Many of the residents of the area are descendants of the enslaved people who worked on this plantation; they therefore carry shared family names, such as Bendolph, Pettway, and Young. The formation of the quilting tradition of Gee’s Bend rises out of the 19th and 20th century and carries on to present day where a vibrant network of collective quilters continues to grow and apply their creative practice. In the 1940s, the land of Boykin was sold in plots by the United States government to local families still living in the Bend. In a complex twist, this made it possible for the Black and Native residents of the area—once subject to the extractive labor and economic practices of enslavement and sharecropping—to gain ownership in part over the same land their families had once forcibly worked within.

Four Eyes One Vision, Basil Kincaid, 2021, © Basil Kincaid. Photo Thomas Barratt

The quilts were originally produced for functional purposes and family use. Over time cooperatives such as The Freedom Quilting Bee (established in 1966 in Rehoboth, Alabama and remaining in operation until 2012) and the Gee’s Bend Quilters Collective (established in 2003) were impactful in shaping an alternative economic model that allowed for the quilters to raise funds for their community. The Freedom Quilting Bee also played a key role in political consciousness-raising, active participants in the drives for voting rights and advocates within the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. Over time, a dynamic dialogue surrounding their work has expanded to international acclaim and enduring critical resonance.

Learn more about this history and support Gee’s Bend quilters by visiting www.soulsgrowndeep.org.

Holbein En Crenshaw (Washington Blvd. and Crenshaw Blvd. LA, CA), Eddie Rodolfo Aparicio, 2018, © Eddie Rodolfo Aparicio. Photo Thomas Barratt

For additional information, please contact:

Andrea Schwan, Andrea Schwan Inc., info@andreaschwan.com, +1 917 371 5023
Christine McMonagle, Hauser & Wirth, christinemcmonagle@hauserwirth.com, +1 347 320 8596

Installation view, THE NEW BEND, Hauser & Wirth, NY. © Photo: Photo Thomas Barrat
Eventi

The New Bend

*Foto in evidenza: Installation view, THE NEW BEND, Hauser & Wirth, NY. © Photo: Photo Thomas Barrat

3 Febbraio – 2 Aprile 2022
Hauser & Wirth New York, 22nd Street

The right to (My) Life,Dawn Williams Boyd, 2017, mixed media, copyright Dawn Williams Boyd, Courtesy of Fort Ganservoort, New York. Photo Ron Witherspoon

Curata da Legacy Russell, Executive Director & Chief Curator di The Kitchen, “The New Bend” riunisce 12 artisti contemporanei che esplorano le tradizioni del quilting e della pratica tessile incentrate sulle differenze di razza, classe e genere – Anthony Akinbola, Eddie R. Aparicio, Dawn Williams Boyd, Diedrick Brackens, Tuesday Smillie, Tomashi Jackson, Genesis Jerez, Basil Kincaid, Eric N. Mack, Sojourner Truth Parsons, Qualeasha Wood, e Zadie Xa. La loro personale visione vernacolare consiste nel rendere omaggio, in un delicato dialogo, ai contributi delle quilter della Gee’s Bend in Alabama – donne afroamericane unite in cooperazione collettiva e produzione economica creativa – e alla loro eredità duratura come luogo di incontro radicale, come spunto e come ispirazione intergenerazionale. Questa mostra riconosce il lavoro di alcune quilter della Gee’s Bend come Sarah Benning (nata nel 1933), Missouri Pettway (1902-1981), Lizzie Major (1922-2011), Sally Bennett Jones (1944-1988), Mary Lee Bendolph (nata nel 1935), e molte altre, riconoscendo il loro ruolo centrale nel raccontare storie di astrazione e modernismo.

Forward walking boy on the edge where the sand meets the shore (from DES HOMMES ET DES DIEUX), Eric N. Mack, 2018, © Eric N. Mack, courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery. Photo Prudence Cuming Associates

Se da una parte il racconto dell’Arte Moderna prevede l’astrazione come strumento critico di sperimentazione, la narrazione come è stata raccontata fino ad oggi non è stata inclusiva di questo gruppo e dei modi in cui continuano a trasformare la storia dell’arte, la cultura visiva e la produzione culturale attraverso luoghi e generazioni. Nel 20° anniversario della rivoluzionaria mostra “The Quilts at Gee’s Bend”, presentata per la prima volta al Whitney Museum of Art (2002-2003), ognuno degli artisti della “The New Bend” esplora questa eredità sia nell’approccio tecnico che nell’estetica formale. Le varie modalità astratte ed espressive di taglio, cucitura, giuntura e remixing si articolano in questa mostra come atti performativi ed editoriali contaminati rimodulando anche la comprensione del digitale, computazionale, memetico e algoritmico. Audrey Bennett, professore di arte e design dell’Università del Michigan, nel 2016 ha coniato il termine “algoritmi del patrimonio” per indicare l’obiettivo di “non ridurre la cultura al codice, ma espandere la codifica per abbracciare la cultura”. Nel loro saggio “On Cultural Cyborgs” (2020), Bennett e il suo collaboratore Ron Eglash, professore di informatica, chiedono di “decolonizzare la cibernetica” come componente centrale dell’etnocomputer. Ciò che le quilters di Gee’s Bend dimostrano grazie al loro innovativo lavoro di cooperazione è che riescono ad essere al contempo artiste ed esperte in tecnologia, contribuendo contemporaneamente alla storia dell’arte, così come alla scienza, alla tecnologia, all’ingegneria e alla pratica matematica (STEM). Questa dualità si ritrova nel lavoro di ogni artista presentato in questa mostra e in molti altri che continuano a crescere seguendo questa tradizione. Attraverso la loro pratica, i 12 artisti in mostra in ‘The New Bend’ propongono scenari appassionanti e con loro questo viaggio prende una nuova e promettente piega.

Ctrl-Alt-Del, Qualeasha Wood, 2021, © Qualeasha Wood, courtesy the artist and Gallery Kendra Jayne Patrick. Photo Qualeasha Wood

La Gee’s Bend

La città di Boykin, conosciuta anche come Gee’s Bend, è un’accogliente comunità afroamericana situata nell’arco di un’ansa del fiume Alabama nella contea di Wilcox, Alabama, Stati Uniti. La località prese originariamente il cognome di un proprietario terriero e schiavista che nel 1816 si stabilì nella zona e costruì una piantagione di cotone. Molti dei residenti della zona sono discendenti degli schiavi che lavoravano in questa piantagione; hanno quindi nomi di famiglia condivisi, come Bendolph, Pettway e Young. La formazione della tradizione del quilting di Gee’s Bend nasce tra il XIX e il XX secolo e continua fino ai giorni nostri, dove una vivace rete di quilter continua a lavorare insieme e ad accrescere la loro pratica creativa. Negli anni 40, la terra di Boykin fu venduta dal governo degli Stati Uniti in lotti alle famiglie locali che ancora vivevano nella Bend (Ansa). In un complesso intreccio, questo permise ai residenti di colore e nativi della zona – soggetti in passato alla manodopera estrattiva e alle pratiche della schiavitù e della mezzadria – di ottenere la proprietà di quella stessa terra che le loro famiglie avevano un tempo lavorato con la forza.

Four Eyes One Vision, Basil Kincaid, 2021, © Basil Kincaid. Photo Thomas Barratt

I quilt erano originariamente prodotti per scopi funzionali e per uso familiare. Nel corso del tempo cooperative come The Freedom Quilting Bee (fondata nel 1966 a Rehoboth, Alabama e rimasta in funzione fino al 2012) e la Gee’s Bend Quilters Collective (fondata nel 2003) hanno avuto un grande impatto nel plasmare un modello economico alternativo che ha permesso alle quilter di raccogliere fondi per la loro comunità. Le Freedom Quilting Bee hanno anche giocato un ruolo chiave nella presa di coscienza politica, partecipando attivamente nelle lotte per il diritto di voto e sostenendo la marcia per i diritti civili da Selma a Montgomery. Nel corso del tempo, un dialogo dinamico che circonda il loro lavoro si è espanso fino a raggiungere il plauso internazionale e una risonanza critica duratura.

Scopri di più su questa storia e sostieni le quilter della Gee’s Bend visitando il sito www.soulsgrowndeep.org.

Holbein En Crenshaw (Washington Blvd. and Crenshaw Blvd. LA, CA), Eddie Rodolfo Aparicio, 2018, © Eddie Rodolfo Aparicio. Photo Thomas Barratt

Per informazioni si prega di contattare:

Andrea Schwan, Andrea Schwan Inc., info@andreaschwan.com, +1 917 371 5023
Christine McMonagle, Hauser & Wirth, christinemcmonagle@hauserwirth.com, +1 347 320 8596

Installation view, THE NEW BEND, Hauser & Wirth, NY. © Photo: Photo Thomas Barrat