InterviewInterviste

HANNAH GARTSIDE

* Featured photo: Illusion Quilt, 2016-17, (detail), found wool crepe and plain-weave wool fabrics (gift of the Ridolfi family), wool wadding, thread, 115 x 95 x 13cm, photo Chris Bowes

Hannah Gartside (London, 1987) graduated with honours in Fine Art (Fashion Design) from the Queensland University of Technology. She then worked as a costume designer for the Queensland Ballet for several years before moving to Melbourne to study sculpture at the Victorian College of the Arts.

Her education and professional experiences have led her to research the use of the textile medium, favouring used fabrics and clothes in which she finds the memory and poetry of lived stories. Her works – sculptures, videos, installations – have been shown in exhibitions and institutional venues, including the Institute of Modern Art and the QUT Art Museum in Brisbane. Her work is currently on display at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney in the annual exhibition dedicated to young Australian artists. Textiles are the material of choice in your research. Materials you experiment with applying different techniques resulting in works ranging from the BUNNIES IN LOVE series small-sized glove sculptures to large installations such as THE SLEEPOVER. 

Illusion Quilt, 2016-17, photo Chris Bowes

In your art practice, how important is experimentation?

 

I spend a lot of time in the studio experimenting or ‘testing’ the potentials and capabilities of my materials. I think of this as a process of listening to them. The reality of it involves cutting, sewing, stretching, knotting, gathering, patching, joining, threading-through, wrapping, zig-zag stitching on milliner’s wire. After last year you could add ‘spinning’ to this list too. 

Many months of 2021 were spent watching the way various fabrics moved when they were spun clockwise or anti-clockwise on a prototype armature (my fabricator rigged me up a base which a steel rod attaches into, that is powered by a drill). I worked with different fabrics, cut in different ways and hanging from different types of armatures to achieve particular effects. Working on them was wild and unknown, like how I imagine it would feel to be in a big, empty, dark space, navigating through with my hands out by listening for changes in sounds of my footfall or the direction of a gust of wind.

O, 2021, 320cm H x 229cm W x 211cm D, found tulle, found 1930s dress and ribbon, silk fabrics, leather offcuts, thread, brass rod, timber dowel rod, photo Chris Bowes.

Fabric is material that belongs to everyone’s life: we come into contact with it continuously and throughout our entire existence, often in physical and intimate contact with the body of which it retains traces and for this reason, we usually attribute a sort of ‘memory’ to it. What are the reasons behind the choice of this medium for your artistic practice?

I feel like the reasons are innumerable! My grandma taught me to sew when I was 7, and I have devoted my life thus far to working with fabric. I adore textiles for the reasons mentioned in your question: their intimacy and everyday prosaic, tender connection to human bodies. I think that it was after my father died when I was 21, (and I did Honours a couple years after, using amongst other things, his shirts and ties for the artwork) that I truly clocked 1) what is stored in cloth and 2) how affecting and transformative working with this material was for me, personally and if so, that perhaps it would be this way for other people as well.

O, 2021, detail, photo Chris Bowes
O, 2021, detail, photo Chris Bowes

In the poetry that permeates all your works, what role do the conceptual characteristics of the textile medium play?

They underpin everything that I do. But I don’t really need that to be evident to the viewer… To spin this question in a different direction: I think that the works can be read intuitively, formally through their visual characteristics or through someone’s lived knowledge of the base materials (a glove, a nightie). You don’t need to understand what’s happening ‘conceptually’ to feel it. That is my aim, anyway, for the work to be felt. I want my work to be for everyone who is interested, not just for people with contemporary art training.  A period stain on a worn nightie, the lingering smell of 4711 perfume, an elbow crease, a fluttering bias-cut pink silk hem, those things can be felt.

The Sleepover, 2018-19, (detail) found nighties and slips, found synthetic fabric and cotton ribbon, millinery wire, thread, wood, 540 x 280 x 210cm, (made with assistance; M Holgar, L Meuwissen, M Ward, K Woodcroft), photo Louis Lim.
Dissolved Nightie in Lilac, 2018, (detail)
Dissolved Nightie in Lilac, 2018, silk fabric, found nightie (gift of L Meuwissen), thread, acrylic, steel, paint, 220 x 89 x 5cm, courtesy the artist, photo Louis Lim, Wangaratta Art Gallery collection.

What are your sources of inspiration?

Music, books, art, lived experience and everyday things. Years ago I was hanging up the washing and I noticed if I pegged up the shoulders as well it changed the way a particular 1970s three-frilled dress hung on the line, it made it look like there was a body in it, raising its backside to me. It was funny and disconcerting. Five years later, I translated that experience into an artwork O (2020).

*At my ex-partner’s place sitting down by the creek one day I noticed the way a leaf fell when it dropped off a tree: it flutters and spirals towards the ground in expanding loops, turning over and over on the way down.

*Walking along the streets where I live I enjoy catching the patterns and shapes in bricks or old tile floors: I love patterns and repetition, it’s the quilter in me, it makes me feel calm and also held/engaged.

*I also find musicians really inspiring– women who are feral and wild onstage. I feel released by their dynamism and relentlessness.

*Sometimes a particular novel or piece of non-fiction will really hold me too. People writing about epic life experiences, particularly in relation to dressing/clothing/dolls/fabricated objects, or magical realism stories which gives objects sentience beyond what we generally do is very interesting to me because I like to treat my materials with their own agency, power, and aliveness.

The artist with Ascension I (Angels), 2019, found nighties, millinery wire, thread, magnets, steel, paint, 313 x 350 x 390cm, photo Louis Lim.

What is the process that transforms the idea into a work of art?

 

Often, I will draw out an installation or sculptural idea multiple times in pencil, sometimes over many years, triggered by a material, pattern, sensation or experience. I will sometimes lay down a tape measure or use masking tape on the floor to work out the scale, then I work out what techniques I need to realise it. Occasionally I start with garden wire, most often I start with a fabric or garment on the cutting table. I make patterns out of thick card if needed (as you would for making a sewing pattern for a garment). Then I pin, cut and sew, and pin, cut and sew. If I’m using an old garment that is rare and precious to me, I will work with another fabric first of similar weight, to get a feel for the processes before moving onto the ‘real’ material. 

I like my hand to be invisible in the work. For the works to look like they always existed in the shapes they are in, even though the materials list and their worn-ness makes it obvious that they have had previous lived-experience. 

Ascension I (Angels), 2019, (detail)
New Terrain, 2016, (detail), found petticoat lace trim and garter-belt clips, tulle fabric, thread, 360 x 161 x 264cm, courtesy the artist and The Johnston Collection, photo Louis Lim.

Movement is an aspect that you investigate through your work. What role and what significance does it have in your research and in your artworks?

Before I moved properly into art-making, I studied fashion design, worked as a costume designer/maker for contemporary dance and then a costume-maker and dresser for classical ballet. Through these experiences, I understand moving fabric as a way of conveying emotion and mood, explaining character and in effect, telling stories. I have long been curious about what I could do with moving cloth in an exhibition context (how I could make it speak, what it could say, its potential for enchanting viewers).

'Primavera 2021: Young Australian Artists', installation view L to R: Loie, Artemisia, Sarah, Pixie, Lilith, all 2021. photo Anna Kucera
Sarah 2021, found black silk satin mourning skirt with taffeta ribbon c. 1890, found black silk satin dress c. 1990s, found black silk mourning dress with beading c. 1920 and satin-backed silk crêpe fabric c. 1930 (gifts of Helen), silk tassels from found Liberty piano shawl c. 1900s (gift of Judy), thread, fusing, steel cable, oxidised silver-plated jewellery fixtures, aluminium, stainless steel, electromechanical components, microcontroller, 190 x 140 x 140 cm (irreg.) Metal fabrication, and mechanical design and fabrication: Laundromat MFG, Programming: Dan Parkinson, Assistance: Meagan Streader, photo Anna Kurcera
Pixie, 2021, (detail), found silk gauntlet glove, found silk, cotton and synthetic fabrics, fusing, thread, wire, aluminium, stainless steel, electromechanical components, microcontroller, 320 x 150 x 150 cm (irreg.) Metal fabrication, and mechanical design and fabrication: Laundromat MFG, Programming: Dan Parkinson, photo Anna Kurcera

Can you tell us about the installation you made for Primavera 2021: Young Australian Artists, which is on until June at the Museum of Contemporary Art?

 

My most recent suite of sculptures, for Primavera, animate antique and vintage dresses and gowns into abstract kinetic sculptures which pay homage to five historical women who lived variously independent, wilful, queer, spiritual lives. 

Last year, I was deeply shaken by hearing about the sexual assault allegations made by a member of staff in a federal ministers office in Canberra. For friends and me it was a moment of reckoning with our pasts, and feeling that unsafeness for women went to the highest level in the country. In the past two years, I have read of multiple cases of sexual midsconduct or assault where a victim’s clothing was mentioned and used as an excuse. I wanted to make works where the clothes fight back: they are sick of being blamed, of being given more agency than a flesh and blood perpetrator. My sculptures are big, pulsing and sensual, they are relentless prayers for change. 

For Tim (1955-2008), 2019-2020, found paper bags, glue, found curtain and dining chair, wood, hessian, foam, wood stain, varnish, found tapestry wool, tapestry canvas, silk organza fabric, found fabrics (wool, cotton, silk, synthetic), thread, curtain heading tape, framed photograph of the artist's parents c. 1990, 660cm W x 630cm D x 307cm H, installed as part of A Family Album at Town Hall Gallery, Victoria, 2020, photo Christian Capurro

Another of your artworks, FALL-WINTER 1986, is currently on display at the Perc Tucker Regional Gallery. Can you tell me about the genesis and evolution of this work?

I am very interested in what clothing can do. How clothes can make someone feel in themself (and how this affects the way that they operate in the world), or affects how they are perceived. I got particularly interested in glamour as a form of social power or a type of enchantment. This thinking started because I began to notice how many sheer leopard print blouses and scarves were in my local op-shop. I bought dozens of them over a period of about 6 months. Then, I wanted a way to animate the blouses, to imagine the bodies or energies of past bodies still held inside them. I was thinking of those weird tube bodies that are outside car showrooms, how they flail about all over the place. I wanted my blouses to both call you in and warn you off.

For Tim (1955-2008), 2019-2020, (detail)

How is your research evolving?

I tend to work on lots of different strands of research at once. Either as physical experiments through to sculptural outcomes or as ideas drawn into my notebook. I think I tend to push one aspect of my practice forward that maybe I’ve sat on for a few years (eg. moving cloth), and then circle back and see where the next most unresolved idea is, or, see what I’ve started already that has the most unrealised potential, and then I pick that up and move forward with it. For example, this year I am going to continue working with factory scraps of 1-3mm leather. I began this in early 2021 and it became a patchwork floor for the installation ‘O’ at Sawtooth ARI in Tasmania, I cut the leather into small shapes and then used a zig-zag stitch on the machine to join the shapes together. Now I want to see what I can do with the leather sculpturally, (and kinetically) and also see if I can apply the strip-piecing quilting techniques that I was using with woollen fabrics back in 2016, with this leather. I guess it’s all overlapping spirals of connections, materials and techniques and emotions.

What are you working on at the moment and what are your plans for the near future?

I have just started working on a collaboration with a studio colleague and friend, Anthea Kemp, a painter. I noticed last year that she had these fabulous, very loose, gestural tests in her studio that she would make on small squares of canvas, before she began a big painting. I was invited to be in an exhibition as part of Melbourne Design week, curated by Josephine Briginshaw and Eliza Teirnan, and they were interested in one of my quilts, so I said how about me and Anthea work together to make a quilt from her scraps and see what happens? I wanted something generative, playful and light to work on after Primavera.

After that, I will move onto making an installation using the leather scraps that I mentioned above, for the inaugural Ellen Jose award exhibition at Bayside Gallery, which opens in early July 2022.

For Tim (1955-2008), 2019-2020, (detail)
Interviste

HANNAH GARTSIDE

*Foto in evidenza: Illusion Quilt, 2016-17, (detail), found wool crepe and plain-weave wool fabrics (gift of the Ridolfi family), wool wadding, thread, 115 x 95 x 13cm, photo Chris Bowes

Hannah Gartside (Londra, 1987) si è laureata con lode in Belle Arti, Design della Moda, alla Queensland University of Technology lavorando successivamente come costumista per il Queensland Ballet per alcuni anni prima di trasferirsi a Melbourne per studiare scultura al Victorian College of the Arts. Esperienze formative e professionali che hanno condotto la sua ricerca all’utilizzo del medium tessile, privilegiando tessuti e abiti usati in cui trova la poesia della memoria di storie vissute. I suoi lavori – sculture, video, installazioni – sono state esposte in mostre e sedi istituzionali tra le quali l’Institute of Modern Art e il QUT Art Museum di Brisbane. Le sue opera sono attualmente esposte al Museum of Contemporary Art di Sydney nella mostra annuale dedicato ai giovani artisti australiani.

Illusion Quilt, 2016-17, found wool crepe and plain-weave wool fabrics (gift of the Ridolfi family), wool wadding, thread, 115 x 95 x 13cm, photo Chris Bowes.

Il tessile è il materiale d’elezione della tua ricerca. Materiali con cui sperimenti tecniche differenti per opere che spaziano dalle piccole sculture di guanti della serie BUNNIES IN LOVE fino alle grandi installazioni come THE SLEEPOVER. Quanto è importante la sperimentazione nella tua pratica artistica?

Passo molto tempo nel mio studio sperimentando le possibilità e testando il potenziale dei materiali. Lo considero un processo di ascolto. In realtà si tratta di tagliare, cucire, allungare, annodare, raccogliere, rattoppare, unire, infilare, avvolgere o cucire a zig-zag sul filo da modista. Dopo l’anno scorso, potrei aggiungere anche la “filatura” a questa lista.

Ho trascorso molti mesi durante il 2021 osservando il modo in cui vari tessuti si muovevano se ruotati in senso orario o antiorario su di un’armatura prototipo (Il mio assistente tecnico ha preparato una base sulla quale attaccare un’asta d’acciaio, che gira alimentata da un trapano). Ho lavorato con diversi tessuti, tagliati in modi diversi e appesi a diversi tipi di strutture per ottenere effetti particolari. Lavorare in questo modo è stato folle e ignoto, come se immaginassi di trovarmi in uno spazio grande, vuoto e buio, procedendo a tentoni, ascoltando i cambiamenti di suono del mio passo o la direzione di una folata di vento.

O, 2021, 320cm H x 229cm W x 211cm D, found tulle, found 1930s dress and ribbon, silk fabrics, leather offcuts, thread, brass rod, timber dowel rod, photo Chris Bowes.

Il tessuto è materiale che appartiene alla vita di ognuno: entriamo in contatto con esso continuamente e nel corso dell’intera esistenza, sovente in un contatto fisico ed intimo con il corpo di cui conserva traccia e per questo, ad esso attribuiamo spesso una sorta di ‘memoria’. Quali sono le ragioni all’origine della scelta di questo medium per la tua pratica artistica?

Mi sembra che le ragioni siano innumerevoli! Mia nonna mi ha insegnato a cucire quando avevo sette anni, e fin’ora ho dedicato la mia vita al lavoro con il tessile. Per le stesse ragioni che hai citato in questa domanda, io adoro I tessuti: per la loro intimità e la loro quotidiana, prosaica e tenera connessione con i corpi umani. Penso che sia stato dopo la morte di mio padre, quando avevo 21 anni, (nel realizzare le opera per la mia tesi di laurea, un paio d’anni dopo, ho usato, tra le altre cose, le sue camicie e cravatte), che ho veramente iniziato a comprendere 1) ciò che è conservato nella stoffa e 2) quanto influente e potenzialmente trasformativo fosse per me, a livello personale, lavorare con questi materiali. Mi sono resa conto che se questo era vero per me, forse lo sarebbe stato anche per altre persone.

Brunswick Studio, detail, 2021. Courtesy Hannah Gartside
O, 2021, detail, photo Chris Bowes.

Nella poesia che permea tutti i tuoi lavori, che ruolo hanno le caratteristiche concettuali del medium tessile?

Sono alla base di tutto ciò che faccio, ma non ho bisogno che questo sia evidente allo spettatore. Per portare la domanda in una direzione differente: penso che le opere possano essere lette intuitivamente, formalmente, attraverso le loro caratteristiche visive o attraverso la conoscenza data dall’avere un’esperienza diretta dei materiali di cui sono fatte (un guanto, una camicia da notte). Non c’è bisogno di capire cosa sta succedendo ‘concettualmente’ per sentirlo. Questo è il mio obiettivo, comunque, che il lavoro sia sentito. Voglio che il mio lavoro sia per tutti coloro che sono interessati e non solo per le persone con una formazione in arte contemporanea. Una macchia di sangue su una vecchia camicia da notte consumata, l’odore persistente del profumo 4711, una piega del gomito, un orlo svolazzante di seta rosa tagliata di sbieco, queste cose si possono sentire.

The Sleepover, 2018-19, (detail) found nighties and slips, found synthetic fabric and cotton ribbon, millinery wire, thread, wood, 540 x 280 x 210cm, (made with assistance; M Holgar, L Meuwissen, M Ward, K Woodcroft), photo Louis Lim.
Dissolved Nightie in Lilac, 2018, (detail)
Dissolved Nightie in Lilac, 2018, silk fabric, found nightie (gift of L Meuwissen), thread, acrylic, steel, paint, 220 x 89 x 5cm, courtesy the artist, photo Louis Lim, Wangaratta Art Gallery collection.

Quali sono le tue fonti di ispirazione?

Musica, libri, arte, esperienze vissute e cose di tutti I giorni. Anni fa stavo stendendo il bucato e ho notato che il modo in cui un vestitino a balze anni ’70 pendeva sul filo cambiava se ne appendevo anche le spalle, sembrava che ci fosse un corpo dentro, che sollevava il suo lato posteriore verso di me. Era divertente e sconcertante. Cinque anni dopo, ho tradotto quell’esperienza in un’opera d’arte: O (2020).

* Un giorno, mentre ero seduta vicino al fiume a casa del mio ex-compagno, ho notato il modo in cui una foglia cade quando si stacca da un albero: svolazza e si avvolge a spirale verso il suolo in anelli che si espandono, girando e rigirando.

*Camminando lungo le strade dove vivo mi piace notare i disegni e le forme nei mattoni o nei vecchi pavimenti di piastrelle: Amo i patterns e la ripetizione, è la quilter che è in me, mi fa sentire calma e anche sostenuta/impegnata.

*Trovo che le musiciste siano di grande ispirazione – donne feroci e selvagge sul palco. Mi sento liberata dal loro dinamismo e dalla loro inesorabilità.

*A volte anche un particolare romanzo o un saggio mi può coinvolgere. Le persone che scrivono di esperienze di vita epiche, in particolare in relazione a vestiti/abiti/pupazzi/oggetti fabbricati, o storie di realismo magico che attribuiscono agli oggetti un aspetto senziente al di là di ciò che generalmente facciamo è molto interessante per me perché mi piace considerare i miei materiali come agenti, aventi potere e vitalità.

The artist with Ascension I (Angels), 2019, found nighties, millinery wire, thread, magnets, steel, paint, 313 x 350 x 390cm, photo Louis Lim.

E qual è il processo che trasforma l’idea in opera d’arte?

Spesso, mi capita di disegnare più volte con la matita un’installazione o un’idea per una scultura, a volte anche per anni, ispirata da un materiale, un motivo, una sensazione o un’esperienza di vita.

Spesso metto per terra un metro o lo skotch di carta per visualizzare le dimensioni di un lavoro, così mi rendo conto di quale tecnica utilizzare per realizzarlo. Talvolta comincio con il filo di ferro da giardino, il più delle volte però comincio con un tessuto o un indumento da tagliare. Se necessario, faccio dei modelli con un cartoncino spesso (come si farebbe per realizzare un modello di sartoria). Poi spillo, taglio e cucio, e spillo, taglio e cucio. Se sto usando un vecchio capo, che è raro e prezioso per me, lavorerò prima con un altro tessuto di peso simile, testando le procedure prima di passare al materiale “reale”.

Preferisco che la mia mano non sia visibile nel lavoro. Mi piacerebbe che le opere vengano percepite come se fossero sempre esistite nella loro forma attuale, anche se l’elenco dei materiali e la evidente consunzione possono svelare la realtà di una loro vita precedente.

Ascension I (Angels), 2019, (detail)
New Terrain, 2016, (detail), found petticoat lace trim and garter-belt clips, tulle fabric, thread, 360 x 161 x 264cm, courtesy the artist and The Johnston Collection, photo Louis Lim.

Il movimento è un aspetto che indaghi attraverso il tuo lavoro. Che ruolo e che significato ha nella tua ricerca e nelle tue opere?

Prima di passare propriamente all’arte, ho studiato fashion design, ho lavorato come costumista per la danza contemporanea e poi come costumista e sarta per il balletto classico. Attraverso queste esperienze, ho capito che il tessuto in movimento è un modo per trasmettere emozioni e stati d’animo, per spiegare i personaggi e, di fatto, per raccontare storie. Sono stata a lungo incuriosita da ciò che avrei potuto fare con il tessuto in movimento in un contesto espositivo (come avrei potuto farlo parlare, cosa avrebbe potuto dire, il suo potenziale nell’ incantare gli spettatori).

'Primavera 2021: Young Australian Artists', installation view L to R: Loie, Artemisia, Sarah, Pixie, Lilith, all 2021. photo Anna Kucera.
Sarah 2021, found black silk satin mourning skirt with taffeta ribbon c. 1890, found black silk satin dress c. 1990s, found black silk mourning dress with beading c. 1920 and satin-backed silk crêpe fabric c. 1930 (gifts of Helen), silk tassels from found Liberty piano shawl c. 1900s (gift of Judy), thread, fusing, steel cable, oxidised silver-plated jewellery fixtures, aluminium, stainless steel, electromechanical components, microcontroller, 190 x 140 x 140 cm (irreg.) Metal fabrication, and mechanical design and fabrication: Laundromat MFG, Programming: Dan Parkinson, Assistance: Meagan Streader, photo Anna Kurcera
Pixie, 2021, (detail), found silk gauntlet glove, found silk, cotton and synthetic fabrics, fusing, thread, wire, aluminium, stainless steel, electromechanical components, microcontroller, 320 x 150 x 150 cm (irreg.) Metal fabrication, and mechanical design and fabrication: Laundromat MFG, Programming: Dan Parkinson, photo Anna Kurcera

A questo proposito, ci racconti l’installazione che hai realizzato per PRIMAVERA in corso fino a giugno al MCA?

La mia più recente serie di sculture, realizzata per Primavera, anima abiti e vestiti antichi e vintage in sculture cinetiche, astratte, che rendono omaggio a cinque donne della storia che hanno vissuto una vita indipendente, volitiva, queer, spirituale. L’anno scorso, sono stata profondamente scossa nel sentire delle accuse di aggressione sessuale da parte di un membro dello staff di un ufficio federale di Canberra. Per me e i miei amici è stato un momento in cui abbiamo fatto i conti con il nostro passato, e ci siamo resi conto che l’insicurezza per le donne è a livelli estremi nel paese. Negli ultimi due anni, ho letto di molteplici casi di abuso sessuale o di aggressione in cui l’abbigliamento della vittima è stato menzionato e usato come scusa.  Ho voluto realizzare delle opere in cui i vestiti si ribellano: sono stanchi di essere incolpati, di avere più peso di un colpevole in carne e ossa. Le mie sculture sono grandi, pulsanti e sensuali, sono implacabili preghiere per il cambiamento.

For Tim family tree embroidery, installation view. Courtesy Hannah GartsideFor Tim (1955-2008), 2019-2020, found paper bags, glue, found curtain and dining chair, wood, hessian, foam, wood stain, varnish, found tapestry wool, tapestry canvas, silk organza fabric, found fabrics (wool, cotton, silk, synthetic), thread, curtain heading tape, framed photograph of the artist's parents c. 1990, 660cm W x 630cm D x 307cm H, installed as part of A Family Album at Town Hall Gallery, Victoria, 2020, photo Christian Capurro

Un’altra tua opera, FALL-WINTER 2018, è attualmente in mostra al Perc Tucker Regional Gallery. Mi racconti genesi ed evoluzione di questo lavoro?

Sono molto interessato a ciò che l’abbigliamento può fare. Come gli abiti possono far sentire qualcuno (e come questo influisce sul modo in cui agiscono nel mondo), o come influiscono su come viene percepito. Mi sono particolarmente interessata al glamour come una forma di potere sociale o una specie di incantesimo. Questa riflessione è iniziata perché ho cominciato a notare quante camicette e sciarpe leopardate ci fossero nel locale negozio dell’usato. Ne ho comprate a dozzine in un periodo di circa 6 mesi. Cercavo un modo per ravvivare le camicette, per immaginare i corpi o le energie dei corpi del passato ancora trattenuti al loro interno. Pensavo a quegli strani pupazzi tubolari che si trovano fuori dagli autosaloni, come si agitano dappertutto. Volevo che le mie camicette richiamassero l’attenzione e allo stesso tempo mettessero in guardia.

For Tim (1955-2008), 2019-2020, (detail)

Come sta evolvendo la tua ricerca?

Tendo a lavorare su diversi filoni di ricerca contemporaneamente; sia che si tratti di esperimenti pratici fino a risultati scultorei, sia che si tratti di idee disegnate sul mio taccuino. Tendo a dare un impulso a certi aspetti della mia pratica su cui forse, per qualche anno, mi sono seduta (per esempio, moving cloth), e poi torno indietro e cerco di individuare un’altra idea irrisolta, oppure individuo qualcosa che ho già iniziato che ha un forte potenziale e non è stato ancora realizzato, lo riprendo e lo porto avanti. Per esempio, quest’anno ho intenzione di continuare a lavorare con gli scarti di fabbrica della pelle di dimensione da 1 a 3 mm. Ho iniziato a farlo all’inizio del 2021 ed è diventato un pavimento patchwork per l’installazione ‘O’ al Sawtooth ARI in Tasmania. Ho tagliato la pelle in piccole forme e poi le ho unite usando il punto a zig zag della macchina da cucire. Ora voglio vedere cosa posso fare con la pelle dal punto di vista scultoreo (e cinetico) e capire se posso applicarvi le tecniche di quilting strip-piecing che usavo, nel 2016, con i tessuti di lana. Credo che siano tutte spirali sovrapposte di connessioni, materiali, tecniche ed emozioni.

A cosa stai lavorando e quali progetti hai per il futuro prossimo?

Ho appena iniziato a lavorare a una collaborazione con Anthea Kemp, pittrice, collega di studio e amica. L’anno scorso ho notato che stava realizzando, nel suo studio, delle favolose sperimentazioni gestuali, molto sciolte su piccoli quadrati di tela, preludio di un grande dipinto. Sono stata invitata a partecipare a una mostra nell’ambito della Melbourne Design week, curata da Josephine Briginshaw e Eliza Teirnan. Loro avrebbero voluto uno dei miei quilt. Così ho proposto: che ne dite se io e Anthea lavoriamo insieme per fare un quilt partendo dai suoi ritagli e vediamo cosa succede? Dopo Primavera volevo qualcosa di generativo, giocoso e leggero su cui lavorare.

Successivamente, per la mostra di inaugurazione del premio Ellen Jose alla Bayside Gallery, che aprirà all’inizio di luglio 2022, farò un’installazione usando gli scarti di pelle che ho menzionato sopra.

For Tim (1955-2008), 2019-2020, (detail)

Barbara Pavan

English version Sono nata a Monza nel 1969 ma cresciuta in provincia di Biella, terra di filati e tessuti. Mi sono occupata lungamente di arte contemporanea, dopo aver trasformato una passione in una professione. Ho curato mostre, progetti espositivi, manifestazioni culturali, cataloghi e blog tematici, collaborando con associazioni, gallerie, istituzioni pubbliche e private. Da qualche anno la mia attenzione è rivolta prevalentemente verso l’arte tessile e la fiber art, linguaggi contemporanei che assecondano un antico e mai sopito interesse per i tappeti ed i tessuti antichi. Su ARTEMORBIDA voglio raccontare la fiber art italiana, con interviste alle artiste ed agli artisti e recensioni degli eventi e delle mostre legate all’arte tessile sul territorio nazionale.