Events

Robb Putnam Visitors: A Mid-Career Survey Exhibition

Walter Maciel Gallery
2642 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, Ca 90034
11 March – 29 April 2023
Opening Reception: Saturday, March 11, 3:00 – 7:00pm

Walter Maciel Gallery is pleased to present Visitors: A Mid-Career Survey Exhibition by Robb Putnam featuring an overview of works from the past 25 years. The show includes an early plastic sculpture made in 2006 while Putnam was a graduate student at Mills College, several series of animal sculptures made from found fabrics and mixed media materials and his newest figurative wall works entitled Orphan Suits.

Putnam started his career as a painter and began exploring sculpture in grad school when he became interested in new materials and forms. He began using found fabrics that he stitched together by hand to create dog sculptures with specific colors and gestures that defined each animal’s presence. Overall, Putnam’s work is an examination of his childhood filtered through the lens of his adult experience. The childlike preoccupation with animal imagery is the essential motivation behind creating his animal forms and often relates to my own personal relationship to actual or imaginary animals from his youth. The works are a result of things that both comforted and scared him creating colors and textures as tactile reminders of these memorable moments and relationships. They explore dualities of fear and comfort, connection and alienation, the real and the imagined.

Wombly. Copyright Rob Putnam

The earliest work in the exhibition is Wombly, a large sculpture of the exoskeleton of Putnam’s childhood imaginary friend. The work is meant to be both a celebration of childhood and a melancholic reflection on absence like an adult looking back at an important aspect of his childhood only to find a vacated shell. It is made of melted plastic over a stuffed fabric form filled with materials such as blankets, shirts, fake fur, and rags that were later removed from its hardened plastic shell to make it hollow. The removal of these soft materials sparked Putnam’s interest in working with the raw fabrics shifting the focus from the outer skin to the inner forms. Putnam began his series of dog sculptures in 2007 with some animals hanging from the ceiling by rope for support and evoking whimsical characters found in stuffed toys and children’s book illustrations. Most of Putnam’s characters have an intentional physical and psychological vulnerability like monstrously overgrown stuffed toys, wounded stray dogs and imaginary friends. They exist in a state of flux, somewhere between coming together and falling apart. Their skins are both invitingly soft and sensual in nature yet raw, exposed and vulnerable. The construction of the dog parts lead to a focus on the snouts which took on similar forms as a sock puppet. Shown in a cluster hanging from the wall, the playful snouts evoke the exaggeration of cartoons or characters from children’s books.

Tenderfoot23. Copyright Rob Putnam

Putnam’s interest in animals grew to include other animal forms including bears, coyotes, rats, skunks and rabbits. In these works, he creates emotional subjects that are empathetic takes on misfit characters, both real and imagined. The real versions of these animals are all known to be scavengers, uninvited guests that intrude into places where humans reside. Like the earlier dog sculptures, they are metaphors for outcasts or misfits who are unwelcomed, shunned and perceived to be flawed while hoping for a chance to communicate their plight. The animal sculptures range from free standing to wall-hanging and are depicted true to life size and unrealistic in scale with a distinctions between the stuffed dense forms and the hallowed out versions weakened and robbed of their weight and proper volume. The essence of all of the work implies a former grandeur and prowess that has been compromised perhaps drawing associations to political issues of climate change and dwelling patterns.

In 2015, Putnam’s work began to evolve into a more abstract direction with the Pelts series. These works are flattened, two dimensional figures with animated features made from stacked areas of colorful fabrics. They offer a stand-in for companionship on a deeper psychological level and offer emotional support for childhood explorations and trauma lodged in our memories. Continuing the format of working on the wall and exploring hollow forms, Putnam developed a series of figurative sculptures entitled Orphan Suits that represent a departure from the literal animal forms and suggest the sense of having once been inhabited by a child who outgrew them. These sculptures allude to the innocence and delight of costumes or mementos from past Halloweens, parties and sleepovers, though they possess limp limbs and an emptiness inside. Here, the void is not a limitless, ominous black hole but is contained by layers of soft fabrics with elaborate textures that represent an accumulation of past experiences created out of the discarded materials to reinforce a sense of neglect. They also suggest a child’s ingenuity to construct with the materials at hand. Putnam’s intricate use of stitching brings to mind a tailor or a surgeon’s handiwork where a needle can either mend or heal. The implied optimism in each work is shared with remnants of darkness, loneliness and loss we all carry within us. There is wisdom in looking back at past experiences in hopes of embracing and surmounting our vulnerabilities that began in the early stages of our lives.

Putnam received a BFA from the Maryland Institute, College of Art in Baltimore and an MFA at Mills College in Oakland. He is a recipient of a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant. His work has been included in several museum exhibitions such as Encounters: Honoring the Animal in Ourselves, Palo Alto Art Center in Palo Alto, CA: Peace on Earth, Museum of Art and History in Lancaster, CA; New Threads: Perspectives in Contemporary Fiber Arts at the Laband Art Gallery, Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles; Sew What at the Children’s Museum of the Arts in New York; Travelers: Objects of Dream and Revelation at the Bellevue Arts Museum, WA and Elements of Nature and Larger than Life: Exploring Scale in Contemporary Art at the Bedford Gallery, Lesher Center for the Arts in Walnut Creek, CA. His work is included in the collections of the Palm Springs Art Museum, Oakland Museum of California, Frederick R. Weisman Collection and 21C Hotels and Museum as well as many private collections. We have represented Putnam since 2008 and his work has been included in five solo exhibitions and several group shows.

Eventi

Robb Putnam Visitors: A Mid-Career Survey Exhibition

Walter Maciel Gallery
2642 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, Ca 90034
11 March – 29 April 2023
Opening Reception: Saturday, March 11, 3:00 – 7:00pm

La Galleria Walter Maciel è lieta di presentare Visitors: A Mid-Career Survey Exhibition di Robb Putnam che presenta una panoramica di opere degli ultimi 25 anni. La mostra comprende una prima scultura in plastica realizzata nel 2006 mentre Putnam era studente al Mills College, diverse serie di sculture di animali realizzate con tessuti trovati e materiali misti e le sue più recenti opere figurative a parete intitolate Orphan Suits.

Putnam ha iniziato la sua carriera come pittore e ha iniziato a esplorare la scultura durante la scuola di specializzazione, quando si è interessato a nuovi materiali e forme. Ha iniziato a utilizzare tessuti trovati che ha cucito insieme a mano per creare sculture di cani con colori e gesti specifici che definivano la presenza di ciascun animale. Nel complesso, il lavoro di Putnam è un esame della sua infanzia filtrato attraverso la lente della sua esperienza adulta. La preoccupazione infantile per l’immaginario animale è la motivazione essenziale per la creazione delle sue forme animali e spesso si riferisce al mio rapporto personale con animali reali o immaginari della sua giovinezza. Le opere sono il risultato di cose che lo hanno confortato e spaventato al tempo stesso, creando colori e texture come richiami tattili di questi momenti e relazioni memorabili. Esplorano le dualità di paura e conforto, connessione e alienazione, reale e immaginario.

Wombly. Copyright Rob Putnam

La prima opera della mostra è Wombly, una grande scultura dell’esoscheletro dell’amico immaginario di Putnam. L’opera vuole essere allo stesso tempo una celebrazione dell’infanzia e una malinconica riflessione sull’assenza, come un adulto che guarda indietro a un aspetto importante della sua infanzia per poi trovare un guscio vuoto. L’opera è realizzata in plastica fusa su una forma di tessuto imbottito riempita di materiali come coperte, camicie, pellicce finte e stracci che sono stati successivamente rimossi dal guscio di plastica indurito per renderlo vuoto. La rimozione di questi materiali morbidi ha scatenato l’interesse di Putnam a lavorare con i tessuti grezzi, spostando l’attenzione dalla pelle esterna alle forme interne. Putnam ha iniziato la sua serie di sculture di cani nel 2007, con alcuni animali che pendevano dal soffitto grazie a una corda di sostegno e che evocavano personaggi stravaganti presenti nei giocattoli di peluche e nelle illustrazioni dei libri per bambini. La maggior parte dei personaggi di Putnam presenta una vulnerabilità fisica e psicologica intenzionale, come giocattoli di peluche mostruosamente cresciuti, cani randagi feriti e amici immaginari. Esistono in uno stato di flusso, a metà strada tra l’unione e il disfacimento. La loro pelle è morbida e sensuale, ma allo stesso tempo cruda, esposta e vulnerabile. La costruzione delle parti del cane ha portato a concentrarsi sui musi, che hanno assunto forme simili a quelle di un pupazzo di calzini. Mostrati in un gruppo appeso alla parete, i musi giocosi evocano l’esagerazione dei cartoni animati o dei personaggi dei libri per bambini.

Tenderfoot23. Copyright Rob Putnam

L’interesse di Putnam per gli animali è cresciuto fino a includere altre forme animali, tra cui orsi, coyote, ratti, puzzole e conigli. In queste opere, l’artista crea soggetti emotivi che sono una rappresentazione empatica di personaggi disadattati, sia reali che immaginari. Le versioni reali di questi animali sono tutti noti per essere spazzini, ospiti non invitati che si intromettono nei luoghi in cui risiedono gli esseri umani. Come le precedenti sculture di cani, sono metafore di emarginati o disadattati che non vengono accolti, evitati e percepiti come difettosi, mentre sperano di avere la possibilità di comunicare la loro condizione. Le sculture di animali variano da quelle libere a quelle da appendere al muro e sono rappresentate a grandezza naturale e in scala irreale, con una distinzione tra le forme dense e impagliate e le versioni santificate, indebolite e private del loro peso e del loro volume. L’essenza di tutte le opere implica una precedente grandezza e prodezza che è stata compromessa, forse associata alle questioni politiche del cambiamento climatico e dei modelli abitativi.

Nel 2015, il lavoro di Putnam ha iniziato a evolversi verso una direzione più astratta con la serie Pelts. Queste opere sono figure appiattite e bidimensionali con caratteristiche animate, realizzate con aree impilate di tessuti colorati. Esse rappresentano la compagnia a un livello psicologico più profondo e offrono un supporto emotivo alle esplorazioni dell’infanzia e ai traumi che sono rimasti nella nostra memoria. Continuando a lavorare sul muro e a esplorare le forme cave, Putnam ha sviluppato una serie di sculture figurative intitolate Orphan Suits che rappresentano un allontanamento dalle forme animali letterali e suggeriscono il senso di essere state abitate da un bambino che le ha superate. Queste sculture alludono all’innocenza e alla gioia dei costumi o dei ricordi di Halloween, feste e pigiama party passati, anche se possiedono arti flosci e un vuoto interiore. In questo caso, il vuoto non è un buco nero illimitato e minaccioso, ma è contenuto da strati di tessuti morbidi con trame elaborate che rappresentano un accumulo di esperienze passate create con materiali di scarto per rafforzare un senso di abbandono. Inoltre, suggeriscono l’ingegnosità di un bambino nel costruire con i materiali a disposizione. L’uso intricato delle cuciture di Putnam fa pensare al lavoro di un sarto o di un chirurgo, dove un ago può riparare o guarire. L’ottimismo implicito in ogni opera è condiviso con i resti dell’oscurità, della solitudine e della perdita che tutti portiamo dentro di noi. C’è saggezza nel guardare indietro alle esperienze passate, nella speranza di abbracciare e superare le nostre vulnerabilità iniziate nelle prime fasi della nostra vita.

Putnam ha conseguito un BFA presso il Maryland Institute, College of Art di Baltimora e un MFA presso il Mills College di Oakland. Ha ricevuto una borsa di studio per pittori e scultori della Joan Mitchell Foundation. Il suo lavoro è stato incluso in diverse mostre museali come Encounters: Honoring the Animal in Ourselves, Palo Alto Art Center di Palo Alto, CA: Peace on Earth, Museum of Art and History di Lancaster, CA; New Threads: Perspectives in Contemporary Fiber Arts alla Laband Art Gallery, Loyola Marymount University di Los Angeles; Sew What al Children’s Museum of the Arts di New York; Travelers: Objects of Dream and Revelation al Bellevue Arts Museum, WA e Elements of Nature and Larger than Life: Exploring Scale in Contemporary Art alla Bedford Gallery, Lesher Center for the Arts di Walnut Creek, CA. Le sue opere sono presenti nelle collezioni del Palm Springs Art Museum, dell’Oakland Museum of California, della Frederick R. Weisman Collection, del 21C Hotels and Museum e di molte collezioni private. Rappresentiamo Putnam dal 2008 e le sue opere sono state esposte in cinque mostre personali e in diverse collettive.